Category Archives: Enterprise

What To Do About Bad Guys in Your Twitter Events

How To Block On Twitter

We’re having a big event, as you already know. We’ve used social media a lot in the planning and preparation of the event, and we want social media used during the event. We want to be able to show engagement, a diverse community, a virtual community as well as the face-to-face folk who come in person. We want people to upload pics to Instagram and Flickr, videos to Vine and Youtube; we want people to blog, and to tweet like crazy.

But anyone who has spent much time on Twitter knows what happens when you get a really active hashtag going. Spammers show up. And sometimes trolls. And sometimes people get confused about your hashtag and start sending content they think is relevant (but really they’re confused and it isn’t at ALL appropriate). And some people are just nasty or snarky on purpose. So what do you do?

There was a manager who instructed a social media team exactly what he expected them to do if a hashtag was co-opted like this. His instructions were for EVERYONE TO STOP TALKING. Yeah, really. That was completely the wrong thing to do, but you can’t blame him too much. He wasn’t at all experienced with Twitter, and was trying to work out his own practical interpretation of the popular Internet trope:

DON’T FEED THE TROLLS!!!

Troll

Of course, it’s not that simple.

For starters, just because you don’t like what someone says doesn’t make them a troll. There are many different types of people who can cause trouble in a Twitter stream (and each one requires different handling). Not to mention that telling everyone talking on an active stream to shut up and stop talking is hugely impractical and unworkable. Face it, it’s like a five year old shouting in a large crowd to shut up. No one hears them.

So what CAN you do? Have a plan. Here’s what I’ve seen work.

BEFORE THE EVENT

1) Have a Team
You really need 3-4 people to handle livetweeting an event. You want a team approach so that you are not just one person trying to make yourself heard, but that there are others who have your back in case of trouble, and who will backup what you are saying and retweet it and repeat it and rephrase it to help the important messages get heard. Remember, if you have multiple locations, you want two people in each room, unless the crowd is really small. The bigger the crowd in the room, the more livetweeters you want there from your team. That may mean that you need more than a 4 person team to handle lots of locations

2) Have a Backup Hashtag
When planning your event and choosing a hashtag, have a backup hashtag, just in case things go south. Don’t publicize it in advance, but make sure you have a core team of people tweeting who know what it is. The idea is, “Hey, people, we’re moving the party to a different room.”

3) Strategize
Make sure your team knows how to spot the different types of problems, and what to do in each case. If the point person is in another room, you don’t want the rest of the team waiting for them to come back. So, here is my long time favorite piece on how to identify different types of problems and how to respond. This was written for blogs, but transfers over fairly well to other types of social media.

Air Force Blog Assessment

4) Prepare
Identify the most likely types of problems you expect. Prepare in advance tweets that describe what to do in case of those events. Have a text file with those prepared tweets. Make sure everyone on the team has a copy. Ideally, have a web page prepared with the info. Don’t share the web page until needed, but when it is needed you can share it with everyone on the stream if you want. If not, it is right at the fingertips of everyone on your team, with all the info right in one place, easy to update on the fly.

DURING THE EVENT

1) OPTIONAL: When the event starts, announce general guidelines and assumptions. These might include general behavior guidelines (don’t be preachy); “we assume your tweets are your own and not your company’s”; who is on your team; what the event is about and what the hashtag means; and other things that might matter to your organization.

2) If you aren’t sure if someone is a spammer, and think maybe they are just accidentally being rude, take the conversation out of the hashtag stream. You can use direct messages (DMs) or personal tweets (using the at-sign (@) and their account name). You can nicely ask them to be careful privately without putting them on the defensive. This often works.

3) When it doesn’t work, or when there is nastiness involved (porn, swear words, aggressive marketing), block them, and tell people on the hashtag stream to block spammers. The way Twitter works is that if a hashtag suddenly has a lot of people blocking a lot of other people, things get fixed faster.
– 3a) If a lot of people block the same account, the account tends to be locked down and will disappear.
– 3b) If a lot of blocking activity is happening in a Twitter hashtag stream, the folks at headquarters tend to notice and start monitoring that hashtag for spammers. Suddenly it will all be cleaned up. But it takes a lot of people working together to get this to happen.

4) If none of that seems to be working, break out your backup hashtag and move the party.

HOW TO BLOCK

I was surprised to find out how many people don’t know how to block someone on Twitter. This is really important for shutting down a flood of spammers in a stream. Here’s a little infographic I whipped up to walk people through the process. Feel free to share it.

How To Block On Twitter

OTHER RESOURCES

Social Media Troubleshooting
Pinterest: Rosefirerising: Social Media Troubleshooting: http://www.pinterest.com/rosefirerising/social-media-troubleshooting/

Troubleshooting Portion of: Twitter Hashtags by PF Anderson
Twitter Hashtags (by PF Anderson) http://www.mindmeister.com/270101756/twitter-hashtags-by-pf-anderson

ABOUT #MAKEHEALTH TROLLS

Nature: Don’t Feed the Trolls http://www.nature.com/news/don-t-feed-the-trolls-1.15343

20 Ways to Reuse Repository Content (Infographic of the Week)

20 ways to reuse repository content
Image source: Ayre, Lucy and Madjarevic, Natalia (2014) 20 ways to reuse repository content. In: Open Repositories 2014, 9-13 June 2014, Helsinki, Finland.

Last week, I was pleasantly surprised to find an infographic within a research article. This week is less surprising, but still a very practical application of infographics — a research poster! I can absolutely see using this idea myself, and actually saw a number of infographic/posters at a recent convention. The take home lesson from that is that infographic design and best practices are becoming a core competency for academics of all stripes.

This particular infographic struck my fancy because it provides interesting insights into ideas and strategies for maximising the impact of academic products. Create your research article and deposit a copy with the local institutional repository (which is, here, Deep Blue).

Deep Blue, 2014

Then you are done, and on to the next project. Right? Or not. One thing I’ve learned is that talk to a researcher around campus and most of them have a story about their favorite project that never got the attention they think it warranted. This infographic is chock full of ideas for what to do about that. Placing a copy in the repository is only the beginning.

On My Radar: “Reverse Innovation”

Ethnic Box

“Reverse Innovation” is a concept that came across my horizon a few months ago, and for which I immediately went into high alert. This is important. I want to push today’s Twitter chat on this topic, so I’m going to keep this post very short, and hope to come back to this more soon.

Briefly, then. What first brought this to my attention was a blogpost at Biomed Central which was closely followed by an article in Smart Planet.

Reverse Innovation in Global Health Systems: Building the Global Knowledge Pool http://blogs.biomedcentral.com/bmcblog/2013/04/12/reverse-innovation-in-global-health-systems-building-the-global-knowledge-pool/

Dehydration cure from developing countries comes to U.S. hospitals http://www.smartplanet.com/blog/bulletin/dehydration-cure-from-developing-countries-comes-to-us-hospitals/27991

The basic idea of “reverse innovation” is this, as expressed through my ill-informed novice point of view. The past century or two have largely seen scitech and research and cultural innovation flow from the first world countries to the third world countries. This has resulted in unrealistic expectations and unsustainable processes which are making life harder for all of us, everywhere across the planet. In the interests of increased sustainability and the desire to create innovation that will integrate more efficiently with the broader systems of the planet, the idea is that problem-solving partnerships between first world and third world researchers can result in innovations that are both effective and sustainable, with the innovations flowing from the third world countries to the first world, thus reversing what has been the recent pattern.

You can discover more information about reverse innovation through these resources.

JOURNAL:
Globalization and health: http://www.globalizationandhealth.com/

KEY ARTICLE:
Developed-developing country partnerships: Benefits to developed countries? http://www.globalizationandhealth.com/content/8/1/17

SOUNDBITE:

“Developing countries can generate effective solutions for today’s global health challenges.”

SPECIAL ISSUE / ARTICLE COLLECTION:
Reverse innovation in global health systems: learning from low-income countries http://www.globalizationandhealth.com/series/reverse_innovations

HASHTAGS:
– Primary
#revsinv
#reverseinnovation
– Other
#revinno
#revinnov
#innoverse

Every Day In Many Ways: Solving “Wicked Problems” at the University of Michigan

Horizon Report 2014 Trends & Challenges
Horizon Report 2014: http://www.nmc.org/publications/2014-horizon-report-higher-ed

The past couple months, the Cool Toys Conversations group has been discussing the Horizon Report, as we do every year. This year we decided the collection of technologies was perhaps not as interesting as the trends and challenges they identified (screenshot above).

Yesterday, over the lunch hour, the group became particularly interested in the wicked problem of “Keeping Education Relevant.” There was a lot of good conversation, and I unfortunately did not take notes, so I am going to trust my memory (HAH!). The gist of it was encapsulated in a couple points. David Crandall pointed out that there is a strong relationship between the so-called solvable challenges and the so-called wicked (or unsolvable) challenges, with the hint that perhaps solving the solvable challenges might actually take us a long way towards solving the unsolvable challenges. (Yes, it’s ok to giggle – that’s a lot of the same word.)

Next was the observation that “Keeping Education Relevant” is distinct from keeping learning relevant, since learning is ALWAYS relevant. So the question is less about how to keep learning relevant, but more about how to position the kind of education that happens in higher education as an active participant in the broad open amorphous space that is comprised of all those glorious online and offline social learning spaces that people love so much.

Last but not least was the interjection that, Hello! Maybe it isn’t so unsolvable after all, since so many folk here are already doing such exciting things to position us, as academics, in ways to show relevance to the public and to engage with the public. Actually, I suspect that all major universities are engaged in similar kinds of activities, and working hard to make clear the ways in which academia is not only relevant, but makes possible research and learning opportunities that benefit the broader communities and which would not be possible or practical in other types of spaces and structures.

Here are just a very FEW examples of activities around campus that are, frankly, not atypical and which illustrate ways in which we are making academia relevant here, every day, as a routine part of business.

UMSI MAKERFEST

#UMSIMakerfest !!! | #UMSIMakerfest !!!
#UMSIMakerfest !!! | #UMSIMakerfest !!!

Today, the School of Information had a Makerfest in the Union. As you can see from the poster, they had a lot of cool stuff going on, from Google Glass and Rasperry Pi to video games and cookies. Among their partners for this event were multiple community makerspaces, both the campus and local public library, individuals with special talents or resources, and of course, campus groups. Was the audience just college students? No way! Students were there, but also parents and kids, teachers, staff, community, and I don’t know who else.

#UMSIMakerfest: https://www.flickr.com/photos/rosefirerising/sets/72157642967068393

TEDXUOFM

DSC_0149 | IMG_6735
3O5A9174_Kimwall | TEDxUofM
IMG_5416 | eak.FEA.TEDxUofM.4-8-11.044.

A couple weeks ago (less, actually), the campus had our TEDx event (TEDxUofM). TEDx events are gatherings of fascinating people sharing innovative and creative ideas. They are spinoffs from the large TED organization where TED stands for Technology Entertainment and Design. My brain keeps trying to change the “E” to “Education”, since that’s what my brain associates with the TED videos, but when you think about it, “Education” and “Entertainment” are pretty closely related in many important ways.

With our local TEDxUofM event, it ALWAYS is highlighting topics that connect academia and the real world, projects that make a difference in the lives of real people, stories that touch hearts and lives. It doesn’t accomplish this by just making a forum for faculty to preach to the choir, but by giving prominence to projects by students and alumni as well, and by getting faculty to talk about their passions beyond their official job duties. In this sense it is like most other TED and TEDx events. Here, of course, the event connects the campus and the town and community. There isn’t just one TEDx event locally, but several — TEDxDetroit, TEDxUofM, TEDxEMU, TEDxSkylineHS, TEDxArb, TEDxYouth@AnnArbor, TEDxUMDearborn, and probably more I haven’t covered/discovered. TEDx events are partnerships with the community, ways to bring information out of ivory towers and into public spaces. They engage, emote, intrigue, and inspire. They foster awareness, and through awareness future collaborations.

RISK BITES

In Andrew Maynard’s recent presentation, “Should Academics Get Down and Dirty with Youtube?,” he illustrated the power of Youtube to reach the public, to educate, to inform, and to potentially inform policy and decisionmakers. This insight of his was reinforced by President Obama’s recruitment of video bloggers (vloggers) with strong reach among the youth audience in order to disseminate critical information about the Obamacare registration deadlines.

Andrew highlighted a number of influential vloggers who present content on science and research, but who are not themselves from academia, then asking what is it that they are doing that we are not? Why is it that the general public obviously have a passion for information about science, but find science information more persuasive when presented by someone who is not a scientist? What are we not doing that we should be or could be doing? These questions are what inspired him to create the Risk Bites series of science videos, in which he endeavors to position academic and heavily evidence-based science information in a public space in a way that will hopefully reach those who need the information. Here is the most recent video from that series as an example.


What’s the difference between hazard and risk? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_GwVTdsnN1E

ROAD SCHOLARS

Goodwill-Industries | Chateau-Chantal
Cascade-Engineering | Discussion-with-legislators

The University of Michigan Road Scholars program has been going on for DECADES. The idea was, yet again, how to make academia relevant to the communities in which we find ourselves. More than that, it was how to create bridges, connections, and partnerships between the University and the people of our state. In the Road Scholars program, faculty travel the state on a kind of pilgrimage to various communities around Michigan, developing a genuine and personal connection to the people and places, learning about the initiatives and work that is done around the state, and fostering opportunities for outreach, partnerships, mutual regard and learning.

GHANA EMERGENCY MEDICINE COLLABORATIVE
D80_35
Ghana-Michigan Conference Nov 2009 023 | Ghana-Michigan Conference Nov 2009 024
D80_30

The Ghana Emergency Medicine Collaborative is another project that has been going on for a while. These images are from an early event in 2009 which laid some of the groundwork for this collaboration between the University and medical programs in Ghana. The collaboration involves individuals from both schools going to the other country to learn more about needs, resources, and opportunities. This innovative partnership drove much of the initial development of the University’s creation of open education resources, and has proven to have a large and lasting impact far beyond the original scope of the project.

CLOSING THOUGHTS

Are you here at the University of Michigan? Are you interested in a campus-wide conversation about barriers to innovation in education and what we are already doing to solve these problems? Do you know of some amazing work people are doing to help keep us relevant? Please add your thoughts in the comments.

Tracking the Trends: Emerging Technologies 2014

Emerging Technology Trends 2014

I’ve been working on this for a while. What you see above is my very first infographic, which I eventually made at Venngage.

E-Tech Trends 2014 [Infographic]: https://infograph.venngage.com/infograph/publish/b097d0b8-8d2f-4ca5-a339-f6ede2bdf8c7

The only problem was that Venngage wouldn’t allow me to export a copy of my work unless I pay them money, and since I don’t have moola to spare you get the low-resolution hard-to-read copy above unless you go to the Venngage site.

BACKGROUND

Briefly, to make this, I took a batch of my favorite white papers, annual reports, and similar resources that choose the most important new tech for various fields. I compiled their lists, and looked for overlaps to identify what seems to be most important across all of them.

WHAT I FOUND

Of the ten reports I examined, there were never more than 5 in agreement on any one technology, and over half of all the technologies are listed in only one of the reports. Of course, that’s the part that is most interesting to me, but that isn’t what will be most important to my bosses. So here are the levels of agreement, as reflected in the infographic.

5 of 10

3d printing
learning analytics

4 of 10

Additive manufacturing
Big data
Flipped classroom
Games & gamification
Social media
Virtual reality
Wearable technology

3 of 10

Artificial intelligence
Mobile learning
Personal agency (learners, patients)
Personal genomics
Social networks

2 of 10

3d bioprinting
Affective computing
Augmented reality
Biometric authentication
Bitcoins & digital currency
Brain-computer interfaces (BCI)
Cloud computing
Drones
Global collaboration
Holographic displays & inputs
Human augmentation
Internet of things (IOT)
Maker culture / makerspaces / consumer to creator
Mobile health monitoring
MOOCs
Newborn genome
Open content
Personal learning networks
Power, renewable
Quantified self
Quantum computing
Robotics
Sensors
Smartwatches
Speech recognition
Speech-speech translation
Virtual assistants
Volumetric Displays
Wearable user interfaces

HOW I DID THIS

I follow a LOT of blogs, Twitter streams, journals, databases, archives, etc. to scan for emerging technologies. My brain sorts these into various categories, informally noted for what level of awareness I feel they need and who I should tell about them, and whether I should tell folk now or if it can wait a while. But that’s all fairly soft and ill-defined. I had a question recently for which I wanted more of a crisp idea of what are the most strategically important emerging technologies.

I could immediately suggest several thinktanks, organizations, and thought leaders who track emerging technologies and push out their annual list of what’s most important. I’m not one of those people, but I watch them. For this question, no one of those reports had what I wanted. I needed education, sci-tech, and healthcare. I wanted to be able to pluck the best from across several reports, and I wanted to be able to do this in a way that went beyond “because I feel it in my gut.”

I made a spreadsheet, entered the technologies mentioned in each report, and checked off which ones appeared in which reports, tallied them up, and this gave me what I put into the infographic. Below, you can find a list of the ten sources I used, and all of the technologies listed that appeared in more than one report.

There are several Horizon Reports, of which more than one might be of interest. Here I used the main Higher Ed report and the Australian report for “tertiary education” (which is basically also higher ed). As a side comment, even though I didn’t use the Horizon Project K-12 education report I often find that the real bleeding edge of tech adoption in education is there, in grade schools. Worth checking out.

There is another fascinating parallel resource to the Horizon Report from Australia (CORE-Ed). And of course, the Gartner Hype Cycle is a must, even though it isn’t education specific, as is the MIT Tech Review’s list of “breakthrough technologies.” The SETDA report for 2013 isn’t out yet, but the 2012 one might still be of interest. Audrey Watters did a rather interesting series in her Hack Education blog on her selections for the top ten edtech trends of 2013. She includes so many use cases and examples in her blog that it is a goldmine of resources to dig through. Berci Mesko’s white paper on the future of medicine is a similar rich resource that points to far far more than is mentioned at the top level.

SOURCES

Here are the links, in alphabetical order.

1. CORE-Ed: http://www.core-ed.org/thought-leadership/ten-trends

2. CORE-Ed Science: http://blog.core-ed.org/blog/2014/02/digital-technologies-and-the-future-of-science-education.html

3. Gartner Report, Hype Cycle: http://www.gartner.com/newsroom/id/2575515

4. Guide to the Future of Medicine: http://scienceroll.files.wordpress.com/2013/10/the-guide-to-the-future-of-medicine-white-paper.pdf

5. Hack Education: Top Ed-Tech Trends of 2013: http://hackeducation.com/blog/tag.php?Search_Tag=ed-tech%20trends%202013

6. Horizon Project: Australian Tertiary Education: http://www.nmc.org/pdf/2013-Technology-Outlook-for-Australian-Tertiary-Education.pdf

7. Horizon Report: http://www.nmc.org/publications/2014-horizon-report-higher-ed

8. MIT Technology Review: 10 Breakthrough Technologies 2013: http://www.technologyreview.com/lists/breakthrough-technologies/2013/

9. Popular Science: 2014: The Year in Science: http://www.popsci.com/article/science/year-science-2014

10. SEDTA National Educational Technology Trends 2012: http://www.setda.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/SETDANational_Trends_2012_June20_Final.pdf

“And I said, ‘Yeah, man. Totally!'”: The Obamacare Vloggers


NicePeterToo: I Met the President: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vEcxXDWqs-A

You really should watch the video embedded above. Last week, President Obama invited several of the young folk with exceptionally active Youtube channels to come visit and talk with him about ideas for how to really use Youtube effectively to get out information about the Affordable Care Act. Now, I say “young folk” from my perspective as an admitted old fogie who remembers life before the Internet existed. I mean, really, before punch card programming. OLD fogie!

Anyway, we spend a lot of time in in various online healthcare communities talking about the power of social media for outreach. We all know that Obama works with masters in using social media effectively, and I’ve blogged about that here many times ([1], [2], [3], [4], [5], [6], [7]). Well, he’s done it again!

Last week, President Obama invited a variety of influential Youtube voices to the White House, asking them to help him reach the American youth to enroll in health insurance programs before the March 31st deadline.

Montage: The Obamacare Vloggers

“Attending the meeting were Hannah Hart, creator of the Drunk Kitchen series; Iman Crosson, an Obama impersonator known online as Alphacat; Michael Stephens, the man behind the YouTube channel “VSauce;” Benny and Rafi Fine, creators of the “Kids React” series; Mark Douglas, Todd Womack, and Ben Relles, who introduced the world to Obama Girl six years ago; Peter Shuckoff and Lloyd Ahlquist of “Epic Rap Battles of History” and Tyler Oakley, an LGBT rights advocate with millions of online fans.”
Obama Enlisted YouTube Personalities For Final Health Care Enrollment Push Last Week: The president asked viral video creators to help boost Obamacare enrollment ahead of the March 31 deadline at a White House summit last week. http://www.buzzfeed.com/evanmcsan/obama-enlisted-youtube-personalities-for-final-health-care-e

Another brilliant use of social media. My kid regularly watches about half of these, which means so do I (and, as an aside, you REALLY might enjoy the new “Kids React to Rotary Phones” which made me ROFL. Really. And made my kid ask me if I know what a rotary phone is. Really). That’s what the introductory video is for this post — famous vlogger NicePeter introducing the topic of why and how he met the President, in real people language, and promising more to come. I can’t wait to see what he says, and the other vloggers! Nice Peter looks to be the first of the group to get a video out, but some of them have added this link to existing videos.

Tell a Friend: Get Covered
Tell a Friend: Get Covered: http://www.tellafriendgetcovered.com

Now, WHY Obama is doing this is the million dollar question. Literally. Well, at least that much, probably a lot more. You see, the logic behind pretty much all health insurance plans is that you have LOT of people in the plan, of all ages and all types of health, and then the need for resources will average out over the groups. So to make this work, you need young folk and old, healthy and not-so-healthy. If that doesn’t happen, well, the whole system breaks down, or costs everyone more money than was expected. The way my budget works, those two things amount to pretty much the same problem.

“He needs them to buy health insurance, and, in some cases, spend hundreds of dollars a month for it. If they don’t, the new insurance marketplaces — the absolute core of Obamacare — will be filled with older, sicker people, and premiums will skyrocket. And if that happens, the law will fail.” Obama’s last campaign: Inside the White House plan to sell Obamacare:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2013/07/17/obamas-last-campaign-inside-the-white-house-plan-to-sell-obamacare/

You’ve probably already figured out that there must be a problem getting young folk to register for Obamacare. Well, it’s true. Sort of. There is a genuine need for more young folk to enroll, but the data about what’s going on is both worrisome and hopeful. Look at the title of this piece.

Bruce Japsen. Less Than A Third Of Enrollees In Obamacare Under Age 34. Forbes 1/13/2014 @ 5:23PM. http://www.forbes.com/sites/brucejapsen/2014/01/13/less-than-one-third-of-obamacare-enrollees-are-under-34/

That is based on enrollment data from the government, and if you read the article, it’s actually fairly positive about youth liking Obamacare and just waiting to enroll because, you know, they’re young, and that’s ‘how they roll.’ Here’s last quarter’s enrollment data.

Figure 2: Trends in the Number of Youth Who Have Selected an Obamacare Plan

During December, there was a more than 8-fold increase in the number of young adults (ages 18-34) who have selected a Marketplace plan through the FFM.


ASPE: Health Insurance Marketplace: January Enrollment Report: For the period: October 1, 2013 – December 28, 2013: http://aspe.hhs.gov/health/reports/2014/MarketPlaceEnrollment/Jan2014/ib_2014jan_enrollment.pdf

The next logical question might be, well, why is he doing this so late? Didn’t the Obama team think of reaching out to youth before it got so late? Actually, they’ve been reaching out for quite a while. I’ll post several examples below. The gist of this late push is that even though the numbers are rising, and the expectation was that youth would probably register late, there have been some unfortunate snafus (such as the web page being down on the day of the biggest push for youth enrollment) and that the expected lateness makes for a bit of nervousness and a desire to ensure that the idea of “registering late” doesn’t end up meaning, “Oops! I forgot!” After all, there are consequences to forgetting, both for the youth as individuals and for the good of the entire program.

OBAMA REACHING OUT TO YOUTH

Obama pitches Affordable Care Act to youth at White House Published on Dec 4, 2013

Obamacare: What if not enough young, healthy people enroll? (+video)
The 18-to-34-year-old cohort is the most coveted for the exchanges, and should be about one-third of enrollees, though there are backstops if enrollment falls short.
By Linda Feldmann, Staff writer / December 5, 2013
http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/DC-Decoder/2013/1205/Obamacare-What-if-not-enough-young-healthy-people-enroll-video

Evan McMorris-Santoro. Youth Obamacare Enrollment Groups Surprised To Learn Obamacare Website Won’t Work On National Youth Enrollment Day: “Obviously, it’s unfortunate,” says one youth enrollment leader. The Obama administration is giving applicants who save applications on Feb. 15 extra time to work around downtime on the site. Buzzfeed posted on February 12, 2014 at 3:13pm EST. http://www.buzzfeed.com/evanmcsan/youth-obamacare-enrollment-groups-surprised-to-learn-obamaca

David Morgan. Obamacare enrollment push for the young enters 11th hour. Reuters Fri Feb 14, 2014 1:02am EST
http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/02/14/us-usa-healthcare-enrollment-idUSBREA1D06X20140214

Adam Aigner-Treworgy and Jim Acosta. Obamacare enrollment hits 4 million, push underway to hit revised goal. CNN February 25th, 2014 08:48 PM ET, Updated 8:48 p.m. ET, 2/25/2014. http://politicalticker.blogs.cnn.com/2014/02/25/obamacare-enrollment-hits-4-million-push-underway-to-hit-revised-goal/

Get Covered (with NBA Star Kevin Johnson) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vndF-I4Cq5k

University of Michigan Trends & Technology Team, February 2014

I’ve been part of the UM Trends & Tech Team for several years, and have always found it to be one of my most rewarding campus groups. We had a meeting earlier today, and I participated via Google Hangout. People often ask me where I find the cool things I share with others. Well, it isn’t something anyone can do alone. I follow lots of news services, blogs, and similar online resources, but I also depend on great people and communities, like this one.

For today’s meeting, the notes were exceptionally clear, and I was able to catch almost all of the resources mentioned. We had a few main topics, and our usual round-the-table sharing session (which is the best part, in my view). The two topics were badges and project management. While these aren’t explicitly medical or library focused, both are topics of importance to the work we do. Screenshots and links are in the slideshow above. Brief overview descriptions below.

BADGES

The idea of “Badges” is one of the recent innovations in education, and a subset of “gamification,” as mentioned in the new Horizon Report. You’ll understand the idea of Badges if you think of scouting, and the way kids train to win badges in specific skillsets. Here’s the official definition.

“A badge is a symbol or indicator of an accomplishment, skill, quality or interest. From the Boy and Girl Scouts, to PADI diving instruction, to the more recently popular geo-location game, Foursquare, badges have been successfully used to set goals, motivate behaviors, represent achievements and communicate success in many contexts. A “digital badge” is an online record of achievements, tracking the recipient’s communities of interaction that issued the badge and the work completed to get it. Digital badges can support connected learning environments by motivating learning and signaling achievement both within particular communities as well as across communities and institutions. (Source: Erin Knight White Paper)” From: MozillaWiki: https://wiki.mozilla.org/Badges

Here are some of the badges resources our team has found and is discussing. This highly selected set includes examples of how folk are using them, tools to support badge projects, and more.

AADL Summer Game http://play.aadl.org/
Badg.Us http://badg.us/en-US/badges/
Badgelab https://badgelab.herokuapp.com/
BadgeWidgetHack http://badgewidgethack.org/
Credly https://credly.com/
Open Badges http://openbadges.org/
Purdue Passport http://www.itap.purdue.edu/studio/passport/

PROJECT MANAGEMENT

Most of us have some sort of project we’re trying to manage, either at work or at home, even if it only means keeping our own lives a bit more organized. There was a subgroup of the team that has been looking at different project management tools, testing them out, and coming back sharing thoughts on what they like or don’t like. Here is a small group of the tools and add-ons mentioned in today’s meeting.

Asana https://asana.com/
Asana + Box http://blog.asana.com/2014/02/boxintegration/
Asana + M-Box http://www.itcs.umich.edu/storage/box/
Basecamp https://basecamp.com/
Evernote https://evernote.com/
Evernote – Kustomnote https://kustomnote.com/
Evernote – Taskclone http://www.taskclone.com/
Evernote app center http://appcenter.evernote.com/
Evernote Food http://evernote.com/food/
JIRA https://www.atlassian.com/software/jira
Trello https://trello.com/
Zoho https://www.zoho.com/projects/

SHARING

My favorite part of the meetings is always when we go around the table. People share projects they are working on, tools they are using, challenges they are struggling to overcome, tips, tricks, tools, news, updates, and more. Sometimes everyone has already heard about something, sometimes no one has except the person talking about it. Some of the tips were about hardware (Chromecast & Google Cast, DASH, Kitkat, Mophie). Many are always about mobile apps, which our group seems to love. There are usually a few coding tools (Fluid, Codepen). Of course, the best part is hearing what people are doing with all of these (especially the CIO using Ideascale and LSA’s brilliant social media campaign #powerof5), but if I added that in for everything, this post would be way too long. You’ll just have to explore the links on your own, or come to the meetings, eh?

Chromecast http://www.google.com/intl/en-US/chrome/devices/chromecast/
CodePen http://codepen.io
DASH https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/hellobragi/the-dash-wireless-smart-in-ear-headphones
Day One http://dayoneapp.com
DeMobo http://www.demobo.com/product.html
Dial2Do http://www.dial2do.com/
EtcML http://www.etcml.com
Fluid http://fluidapp.com/
Google Cast https://developers.google.com/cast/
HipChat https://www.hipchat.com/
Ideascale https://ideascale.com/
Ideascale for UM http://cesandbox.ideascale.com/
KitKat http://www.android.com/kitkat/
MOPHIE http://www.mophie.com/shop/space-pack-iphone-5s
Netlytic https://netlytic.org/
Paper (53) http://www.fiftythree.com/paper
Paper (Facebook) https://www.facebook.com/paper
Paperpile https://paperpile.com
Powerof5 http://lsapowerof5.tumblr.com/
Powerof5 https://tagboard.com/powerof5
Slack https://slack.com/
UM Staff Stories http://hr.umich.edu/staffstories/category/stories/
Touch Room http://touchroomapp.com
TV Tag (GetGlue) http://tvtag.com/
VSCOCAM https://vsco.co/vscocam

Global Metrics for Access & Use of Social Media & Technologies


Global Digital Statistics 2014: Social, Digital & Mobile Around The World (January 2014) http://www.slideshare.net/wearesocialsg/social-digital-mobile-around-the-world-january-2014

Consider this slide deck from We Are Social a reference resource. I know many of the departments recruit students from other parts of the world. This is a great resource to give both a high level overview of how people around the world tend to use various types of technologies, as well as a comparison metrics at the level of individual countries, so you can plan appropriate and respectful strategies for approaching a specific community. Some folk also use this to plan for travel, so they have an idea what resources will be easy to access in a given location.

They also do a lovely job of providing their sources, which are worth repeating here.

* China Internet Network Information Center (CNNIC): http://www1.cnnic.cn/ 32nd Statistical Report on Internet Development: http://www1.cnnic.cn/AU/MediaC/rdxw/hotnews/201307/t20130722_40723.htm
* Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/ Newsroom: http://newsroom.fb.com/ Key Facts: http://newsroom.fb.com/Key-Facts
* International Telecommunication Union (ITU): http://www.itu.int/ Statistics http://www.itu.int/en/ITU-D/Statistics/Pages/stat/default.aspx
* Internet World Stats: http://www.internetworldstats.com/
* TenCent (China): http://www.tencent.com/en-us/index.shtml
* US CIA: World Factbook: https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/ Internet Users: https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/rankorder/2153rank.html
* US Census: http://www.census.gov/
* VKontakte (Russia): http://vk.com/club200

On the other hand, sometimes, while searching for links for these, I found other resources that are at least as useful, if not more so. Then I would also stumble on special tools, apps and infographics! Enjoy!

MORE INTERNET STATISTICS

Internet Census 2012: http://internetcensus2012.bitbucket.org/paper.html

Internet Security Census 2013: http://www.fortinet.com/resource_center/survey/internet-security-census-2013-global-survey.html

OpenNet Initiative (Internet Censorship): https://opennet.net/

Social Bakers: Facebook Statistics: http://www.socialbakers.com/facebook-statistics/

W3Techs (Web Technology Surveys): http://w3techs.com/ Technologies: http://w3techs.com/technologies/ Languages Used: http://w3techs.com/technologies/overview/content_language/all

Wikipedia: Global Internet Usage: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Global_Internet_usage
NOTE: This one has great graphs.

World Map of Social Networks: http://vincos.it/world-map-of-social-networks/

EXTRAS

US Census Mobile App (dwellr): http://www.census.gov/mobile/

US Census: Data Visualization of the Week: Total Population and Population Missing Due to HIV/AIDS Epidemics: 2012; Selected Countries in Sub-Saharan Africa http://www.census.gov/dataviz/visualizations/062/?intcmp=sldr7

US Census: Infographics Highlight the History and Measurement of Poverty: http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/poverty/cb14-tps02.html

Worldometers: http://www.worldometers.info/

#HCLDR Chat: What’s Emerging Tech Got To Do With Us?

Gear: Emerging Technologies

From social media to wearable technologies, from bioprinting to the quantified self movement, emerging technologies have the potential to change lives and clinical practice. At the same time, change isn’t always welcomed, and it is often difficult to determine which proposed changes bear the most value and the least risk. Even for those high value innovations, there have always been challenges with disseminating new ideas, testing and validating them, and promoting adoption of validated innovations.

These are some of the issues that have driven and continue to drive both the evolution of translational science and newer research methodologies such as systematic reviews and comparative effectiveness reviews.

Medical librarians have been intimately involved in aspects of evidence-based clinical practice, and the systematic review and comparative effectiveness review methodologies. They are also deeply engaged in providing information, expertise, and support to clinicians, patients, and administrators. They also support dissemination of innovation throughout an enterprise by acting as conduits, cheerleaders, or gatekeepers for new information, policies, and technologies.. But could they be doing more to help support proactive strategic decisionmaking with respect to emerging technologies?

The Deloitte 2013 Survey of Physicians showed significant lags with physician adoption of health information technologies. Another 2013 report, this one from Kaiser Permanente, begins with this:

“Electronic health records (EHRs) have been available for decades, and yet hospitals, doctors, and other caregivers have been slow to adopt them. This is true even though 74% of U.S. physician EHR adopters in 2011 said that using their systems enhanced overall patient care, and 85% reported being somewhat or very satisfied with their systems (Jamoom, Beatty, Bercovitz, Woodwell, Palso, & Rechtsteiner, 2012).”

With concerns about lags in adoption for proven technologies such as EHR which have been shown to have value for decades, how will the practice of healthcare accommodate the ever increasing pace of innovation in health IT? How will emerging technologies be identified and integrated into practice? Increasingly, patients are taking the initiative for solving personal healthcare challenges with areas such as the quantified self movement, the maker movement, personal genomics, and personalized medicine.

The Medical Library Association has initiated a large systematic review project to assess the level of evidence available to support the profession and practice of medical librarianship in several very important questions. Team #6 has been assigned to explore this topic: “The explosion of information, expanding of technology (especially mobile technology), and complexity of healthcare environment present medical librarians and medical libraries opportunities and challenges. To live up with the opportunities and challenges, what kinds of skill sets or information structure do medical librarians or medical libraries are required to have or acquire so as to be strong partners or contributors of continuing effectiveness to the changing environment?”

We would deeply value the thoughts and insights of healthcare professionals and leaders in helping to define these questions.

T1: What emerging technologies do you find most important and relevant in healthcare?

T2: What are appropriate roles for medical libraries and librarians with respect to emerging technologies?

T3: What issues concern you most about adoption of emerging technologies? What barriers to adoption are you aware of, or solutions for overcoming barriers to adoption?

Here is our current draft of emerging technologies that have been identified as being of interest.

Mindmeister: MLA Emerging Technologies: http://www.mindmeister.com/275111357/mla-emerging-technologies

Please join us for the weekly #HCLDR chat on Tuesday September 3, 2013 at 8:30pm Eastern Time (North America). Hosted by: Patricia Anderson. Moderator: Lisa Fields

ADDITIONAL READING

American Hospital Association. Adopting Technological Innovation in Hospitals: Who Pays and Who Benefits? (2006) http://www.aha.org/content/00-10/061031-adoptinghit.pdf

Anderson P. Maker Movement Meets Healthcare (2013) http://etechlib.wordpress.com/2013/08/12/maker-movement-meets-healthcare/

Cain M, Mittman R. Diffusion of Innovation in Healthcare. (2002) http://www.chcf.org/~/media/MEDIA%20LIBRARY%20Files/PDF/D/PDF%20DiffusionofInnovation.pdf

Coye MJ, Aubry WM, Yu W. The “Tipping Point” and Health Care Innovations: Advancing the Adoption of Beneficial Technologies (2003) http://www.nihcm.org/pdf/Coye.pdf

McCann, Erin. Docs still lag with health IT adoption, Deloitte study sheds light on health IT to-do list (May 2013). http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/docs-still-lag-health-it-adoption

Physician adoption of health information technology: Implications for medical practice leaders and business partners (2013) http://www.deloitte.com/assets/Dcom-UnitedStates/Local%20Assets/Documents/Health%20Care%20Provider/us_dchs_2013PhysicianSurveyHIT_051313%20(2).pdf

Plsek P. Complexity and the Adoption of Innovation in Health Care. (2003) http://www.nihcm.org/pdf/Plsek.pdf

Porter, Molly. Adoption of Electronic Health Records in the United States (February 2013). http://xnet.kp.org/kpinternational/docs/Adoption%20of%20Electronic%20Health%20Records%20in%20the%20United%20States.pdf

Will It Work Here? A Decisionmaker’s Guide to Adopting Innovations. (AHRQ Publication No. 08-0051 (2008) http://www.innovations.ahrq.gov/guide/InnovationAdoptionGuide.pdf


First posted at: HCLDR: SEPT 3 CHAT – WHAT’S EMERGING TECH GOT TO DO WITH US? http://hcldr.wordpress.com/2013/09/01/sept-3-emerging-tech/

#CoolToys: Lifestreaming

Today’s Cool Toys Conversations group met to learn more about lifestreaming (not livestreaming, as some attendees thought). Britain Woodman was our fearless leader for the day, and folk were encouraged to also look at how Shawn Sieg lives the lifestreaming life. Here are a few highlights from the meeting.

What’s Lifestreaming?

“A lifestream is a time-ordered stream of documents that functions as a diary of your electronic life; every document you create and every document other people send you is stored in your lifestream.”
The Yale Lifestreams Project Page, Circa 1996: http://cs-www.cs.yale.edu/homes/freeman/lifestreams.html

Why Lifestream?

Other reasons discussed included adding value for others, transparency, making yourself and your personal brand more discoverable, ease of discovery for others as well as for yourself, as an external memory aid, simplifying your content production, searchability, safety (crime prevention), and more. One motivator for some is to connect various information streams to discover new insights, especially in the context of quantified-self and self-tracking for health. MakeUseOf posted about incentives that drive lifestreaming. There was an interesting conversation around Robert Scoble’s post on this back in 2009, but evidently the original post has disappeared or moved with the loss of Posterous.

The new billion-dollar opportunity: real-time-web curation. (Read the comments on this). http://friendfeed.com/scobleizer/db61f306/new-billion-dollar-opportunity-real-time-web

What is StoryTlr?

StoryTlr

Storytlr is a very useful tool for aggregating and (partially) archiving your own content from various cloud-based services and social media streams into a personal space on your own server. It primarily archives the text in an SQL database format, with thumbnails for images, and links to the full images and videos. It does not archive the full images or videos. It also facilitates creating stories from your various media around a particular event or day. Storytlr is open source, with the source code on GitHub.

“You can import from 18 popular sources, easily post your own updates, pick from a range of styles and create compelling stories from your content.”

What if I don’t have my own server?

More Info About Lifestreaming & Lifelogging

Lifeloggers from Memoto on Vimeo.

Lifestream Blog: Lifelogging: Resources: http://lifestreamblog.com/lifelogging/

THEN

Lifelogging, An Inevitability (2007): http://www.kk.org/thetechnium/archives/2007/02/lifelogging_an.php

Karapanos, Evangelos, PhD. Blog http://www.ekarapanos.com/blog.html
[NOTE: Fascinating entries such as "Supporting Diary Studies with Lifelogging" and "Lifelogging tools for patients suffering episodic memory impairment."]

Krynsky, Mark. Understanding the Value of Lifestreaming (2009): http://lifestreamblog.com/understanding-the-value-of-lifestreaming/

Stanford Students Design for Lifelogging (2011): http://quantifiedself.com/2011/03/stanford-students-design-for-lifelogging/

NOW

How Lifelogging is Transforming the Way We Remember, Track Our Lives (2013) http://www.wired.com/insights/2013/06/how-lifelogging-is-transforming-the-way-we-remember-track-our-lives/

I always feel like somebody’s watching me: The effect of wearable cameras (2013): http://connect.dpreview.com/post/8900204429/wearable-camera-affect

‘Life logging’ app Saga lets you share every single moment of your life (2013): http://venturebeat.com/2013/07/30/life-logging-app-saga-lets-you-share-every-single-moment-of-your-life/

Logging our lives with wearable tech (2013): http://www.deccanherald.com/content/339162/logging-our-lives-wearable-tech.html

Using a Smartphone’s Eyes and Ears to Log Your Every Move | MIT Technology Review (2013) http://www.technologyreview.com/news/516566/using-a-smartphones-eyes-and-ears-to-log-your-every-move/