Category Archives: Librarianship

Infographic of the Week: HHS Infographics Collection!

HHS Infographics on Flickr
Flickr: Group: HHS Infographics: https://www.flickr.com/groups/hhsinfographics/

I just discovered a Flickr group that collects infographics from the US Department of Health and Human Services. WOW. Talk about a great resource! There are many infographics in the collection, and also marketing images for specific health challenges or initiatives.

HHS Infographics on Flickr

This isn’t all they have, though! You can many of these in sets or albums from the HHSgov Flickr Stream.

Flickr: HHS: Sets: Health Care Infographics: https://www.flickr.com/photos/hhsgov/sets/72157633968047018/

Flickr: HHS: Sets: HHS Infographics: https://www.flickr.com/photos/hhsgov/sets/72157632180365890/

Now, it is completely wonderful to have a one stop shop to go hunt health infographics from a reliable source and of known high quality. Extremely useful! But this is even better than that. Because these are in a Flickr Group, there are many other things you can do.

If you have a Flickr account, you can request to join to track the images that appear in the group, or you can use the RSS feed from the group in your feed reader.

You could set up a computer display in a public area, and start the “slideshow” view from the group as a way to engage the public around quality health information.

Because these are licensed as “United States government work,” you can download these, re-use them, post them yourself, put them on your website, edit and modify them. As they say:

Anyone may, without restriction under U.S. copyright laws:
* reproduce the work in print or digital form;
* create derivative works;
* perform the work publicly;
* display the work;
* distribute copies or digitally transfer the work to the public by sale or other transfer of ownership, or by rental, lease, or lending.

Niiiiiice.

However, because these are in Flickr, the absolute easiest way to share them is to just embed them on your webpage or site, or share the link wherever you wish. Here’s an example.

Recently, I’ve been seeing many conversations on social media, on Twitter, Facebook, and in blogs, about issues with patients access to their electronic health record and problems with the accuracy of the information in their record. Right now, this is again a timely issue. The HHS has a series of four short infographics on exactly this topic. I can choose one or any or all and, with a Flickr account, grab the embed code to put them in this blogpost without having to download or upload or rename or identify or worry about the accessibility of the code. Here’s what it looks like.

Know Your HIPAA Rights #1Know Your HIPAA Rights #2
Know Your HIPAA Rights #3Know Your HIPAA Rights #4

If someone clicks on any of the four images above, it will take them to the original image, in a larger size. The source is right there, and I didn’t have to do the work. So very helpful. I love this resource. So glad I found them!

Dementia Books (#DemBk) — Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of May 19, 2014)

Strange Relation, by Rachel Hada, pg. 100
Rachel Hadas. Strange Relation: a memoir of marriage, dementia, and poetry. Philadelphia: Paul Dry Books, 2011. [Author's Site | Goodreads | Mirlyn | NPR]

I was introduced to a really clever idea recently. You know how we are always looking for stories to help us or others understand conditions and diagnoses? It’s a fairly common question at all libraries, but especially public libraries (“Can you help me find a book on XXX?”). Librarians have all kinds of tips and tricks for finding recommended and high quality books on both common and obscure topics. Reading lists for patients are created by libraries and healthcare facilities, as well as both professional and advocacy organizations. The twist that made this especially intriguing was a patient advocacy organization using social media to crowdsource the development of a booklist on their condition of interest, in this case, dementia and Alzheimer’s. The main hashtag used is #dembk, but there also exists a bookclub tag for the same community (#DemBkClub) as well as folk who simply use the combination of #dementia #books.

This is how it started.

This was when I realized this was “a thing,” and started looking for more. He’s the list they came up with for Dementia Awareness Week, and some other outcomes from the Twitter conversations around this topic.

Books About Dementia for All Ages to Read: http://www.dementiachallengers.com/books-about-dementia.html

Here are some of the conversations and range of tweets I found sharing books on dementia.


First posted at THL Blog: http://thlibrary.wordpress.com/2014/05/27/dementia-books-dembk-hashtags-of-the-week-hotw-week-of-may-19-2014/

More on Emerging Technologies in Libraries

Gear: Emerging Technologies

Following up on last week’s post about emerging technologies, I’ve found several other very recent slide decks about emerging technologies in libraries. These range from what’s interesting, what’s being done, how to strategize approaches and adoption, what pays off and what doesn’t, concerns and challenges, and other interesting useful bits.

EXAMPLES IN LIBRARIES

This deck by Jennifer Baxmeyer was developed to support a lecture in a library school course, and seems to have been intended to provide a broad overview of some of the technologies now being used in libraries. It is a rich, long, slide deck with a lot of slides, a lot of examples, and many ideas. It also serves to provide context around the idea of emerging technologies in libraries.


Emerging Technologies for Libraries and Librarians, 2013
by Jennifer Baxmeyer, Leader, Serials and E-Resources Team; Princeton University Library on Aug 01, 2013
http://www.slideshare.net/cellobax/emerging-technologies-for-libraries-and-librarians-2013

STRATEGIES

The most visually engaging and inspiring deck from today’s collection, Samantha Chada’s slides are worth looking at just to try to learn more about making gorgeous slides. What it doesn’t do (as is common with visually beautiful slide decks) is to clearly communicate the content without having the speaker present. Few words. There are fabulous screenshots and examples of ways in which other libraries are using some of these technologies, with a focus on apps, games, cloud computing, and makerspaces. Then she gets really fun and expands with some I’ve been wanting to blog about here – MOOCs, Raspberry Pi, hackathons … I will say that this deck makes me want to sit down with her and chat for a while!


Emerging Technologies in the Library
by Samantha Chada, Associate Director of Technology; Sandusky Library on Feb 18, 2013
http://www.slideshare.net/samchada/emerging-technologies-in-the-library-16601233

ISSUES

I was delighted to see a deck from Michelle Kraft because she always does such thoughtful work, and provides a real world counterbalance to folk like me who want to try everything. She focused on disruption and broader societal change, and how the evolution of the world arounds us leads to needed change in libraries.


Emerging Technologies & Evolving Library
by Michelle Kraft, Medical Librarian; Cleveland Clinic Alumni Library on Oct 04, 2013
http://www.slideshare.net/michellekraft/midwest

CHALLENGES

This might be my favorite of the batch. It appears to be a report out from an analysis of a survey of medical librarians looking at skills, attitudes, training opportunities, and other questions, all presented with nice graphs and charts and data visualizations. I was particularly intrigued by the comparison of the Horizon Report and the Gartner Hype Cycle as to what most interested this demographic. I was also intrigued to see that the interests driving future adoption seemed to be focused on media production skills and educational technologies. The two greatest barriers, by FAR, were lack of time and hospital firewalls. All in all, a very useful deck.


Emerging Technologies in Medical Libraries: Librarian Interest and Perceived Challenges
by Andrea Wright et al, on Mar 20, 2013; NN/LM SE/A Beyond the SE/A March 2013
http://www.slideshare.net/alwright1/emerging-technologies-in-medical-libraries-librarian-interest-and-perceived-challenges

Bioethics & Bias — Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of January 6, 2014)

Bioethics

During last night’s #HCSM Twitter chat, the conversation began with what changed in healthcare social media during 2013. What I particularly noticed was the shift from including ethics and bioethics in broader Twitter conversations (on health, medicine, policy development, palliative medicine, and so forth) to Twitter chats explicitly focused on bioethics.

I’m particularly impressed that the #BIOETHX chat was just founded in October of last year and has rapidly become one of the “always-trending” influential hashtags in healthcare on Twitter. The most recent #BIOETHX chat was on sexuality and gender, with prior chats on research ethics, competence & decision-making, CAM, disability ethics, and medical disclosure. They meet at 8:30PM Eastern Time for their weekly Twitter chats, so please drop in tonight for their chat on brain death.

On a related note, the medical librarians community this year founded another Twitter chat on a related topic – healthcare disparities (#MLAdisparities), for which the inaugural topic in December was implicit bias. In today’s post, I’d like to highlight tweets from these two hashtags as an indication of the growing maturity of Twitter for discussing the hard issues in healthcare.

BIOETHICS / #BIOETHX

BIAS / IMPLICIT BIAS / #MLADISPARITIES


First posted at THL Blog: http://thlibrary.wordpress.com/2014/01/06/bioethics-bias-hashtags-of-the-week-hotw-week-of-january-6-2014/

Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): Healthcare Leaders on the Future of Medical Librarians (Week of September 2, 2013)

Gear: Emerging Technologies

This week I was privileged to participate in a Twitter chat for the healthcare leaders group, #HCLDR.

Health Care Leaders (#HCLDR) Sept 3 Chat – What’s Emerging Tech Got to Do With Us? http://hcldr.wordpress.com/2013/09/01/sept-3-emerging-tech/

As part of this chat, they were discussing how they envision what medical librarians and libraries can be engaged with emerging technologies in healthcare. There were some very interesting and insightful perspectives that I’d love to share with you here.


First posted at THL Blog: http://thlibrary.wordpress.com/2013/09/06/hashtags-of-the-week-hotw-healthcare-leaders-on-the-future-of-medical-librarians-week-of-september-2-2013/

#HCLDR Chat: What’s Emerging Tech Got To Do With Us?

Gear: Emerging Technologies

From social media to wearable technologies, from bioprinting to the quantified self movement, emerging technologies have the potential to change lives and clinical practice. At the same time, change isn’t always welcomed, and it is often difficult to determine which proposed changes bear the most value and the least risk. Even for those high value innovations, there have always been challenges with disseminating new ideas, testing and validating them, and promoting adoption of validated innovations.

These are some of the issues that have driven and continue to drive both the evolution of translational science and newer research methodologies such as systematic reviews and comparative effectiveness reviews.

Medical librarians have been intimately involved in aspects of evidence-based clinical practice, and the systematic review and comparative effectiveness review methodologies. They are also deeply engaged in providing information, expertise, and support to clinicians, patients, and administrators. They also support dissemination of innovation throughout an enterprise by acting as conduits, cheerleaders, or gatekeepers for new information, policies, and technologies.. But could they be doing more to help support proactive strategic decisionmaking with respect to emerging technologies?

The Deloitte 2013 Survey of Physicians showed significant lags with physician adoption of health information technologies. Another 2013 report, this one from Kaiser Permanente, begins with this:

“Electronic health records (EHRs) have been available for decades, and yet hospitals, doctors, and other caregivers have been slow to adopt them. This is true even though 74% of U.S. physician EHR adopters in 2011 said that using their systems enhanced overall patient care, and 85% reported being somewhat or very satisfied with their systems (Jamoom, Beatty, Bercovitz, Woodwell, Palso, & Rechtsteiner, 2012).”

With concerns about lags in adoption for proven technologies such as EHR which have been shown to have value for decades, how will the practice of healthcare accommodate the ever increasing pace of innovation in health IT? How will emerging technologies be identified and integrated into practice? Increasingly, patients are taking the initiative for solving personal healthcare challenges with areas such as the quantified self movement, the maker movement, personal genomics, and personalized medicine.

The Medical Library Association has initiated a large systematic review project to assess the level of evidence available to support the profession and practice of medical librarianship in several very important questions. Team #6 has been assigned to explore this topic: “The explosion of information, expanding of technology (especially mobile technology), and complexity of healthcare environment present medical librarians and medical libraries opportunities and challenges. To live up with the opportunities and challenges, what kinds of skill sets or information structure do medical librarians or medical libraries are required to have or acquire so as to be strong partners or contributors of continuing effectiveness to the changing environment?”

We would deeply value the thoughts and insights of healthcare professionals and leaders in helping to define these questions.

T1: What emerging technologies do you find most important and relevant in healthcare?

T2: What are appropriate roles for medical libraries and librarians with respect to emerging technologies?

T3: What issues concern you most about adoption of emerging technologies? What barriers to adoption are you aware of, or solutions for overcoming barriers to adoption?

Here is our current draft of emerging technologies that have been identified as being of interest.

Mindmeister: MLA Emerging Technologies: http://www.mindmeister.com/275111357/mla-emerging-technologies

Please join us for the weekly #HCLDR chat on Tuesday September 3, 2013 at 8:30pm Eastern Time (North America). Hosted by: Patricia Anderson. Moderator: Lisa Fields

ADDITIONAL READING

American Hospital Association. Adopting Technological Innovation in Hospitals: Who Pays and Who Benefits? (2006) http://www.aha.org/content/00-10/061031-adoptinghit.pdf

Anderson P. Maker Movement Meets Healthcare (2013) http://etechlib.wordpress.com/2013/08/12/maker-movement-meets-healthcare/

Cain M, Mittman R. Diffusion of Innovation in Healthcare. (2002) http://www.chcf.org/~/media/MEDIA%20LIBRARY%20Files/PDF/D/PDF%20DiffusionofInnovation.pdf

Coye MJ, Aubry WM, Yu W. The “Tipping Point” and Health Care Innovations: Advancing the Adoption of Beneficial Technologies (2003) http://www.nihcm.org/pdf/Coye.pdf

McCann, Erin. Docs still lag with health IT adoption, Deloitte study sheds light on health IT to-do list (May 2013). http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/docs-still-lag-health-it-adoption

Physician adoption of health information technology: Implications for medical practice leaders and business partners (2013) http://www.deloitte.com/assets/Dcom-UnitedStates/Local%20Assets/Documents/Health%20Care%20Provider/us_dchs_2013PhysicianSurveyHIT_051313%20(2).pdf

Plsek P. Complexity and the Adoption of Innovation in Health Care. (2003) http://www.nihcm.org/pdf/Plsek.pdf

Porter, Molly. Adoption of Electronic Health Records in the United States (February 2013). http://xnet.kp.org/kpinternational/docs/Adoption%20of%20Electronic%20Health%20Records%20in%20the%20United%20States.pdf

Will It Work Here? A Decisionmaker’s Guide to Adopting Innovations. (AHRQ Publication No. 08-0051 (2008) http://www.innovations.ahrq.gov/guide/InnovationAdoptionGuide.pdf


First posted at: HCLDR: SEPT 3 CHAT – WHAT’S EMERGING TECH GOT TO DO WITH US? http://hcldr.wordpress.com/2013/09/01/sept-3-emerging-tech/

Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): Medical Librarians Take On Emerging Technology (Week of August 5, 2013)

MLA Systematic Review: Emerging Technologies
MLA Systematic Review: Emerging Technologies: http://bit.ly/MLASRetech OR https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dHBacW9KdmlSWUpzbW1ieGVzTkFPZ3c6MQ

The Medical Library Association has initiated a large systematic review project to assess the level of evidence available to support the profession and practice of medical librarianship in several very important questions. This team, #6, has been assigned to explore this topic: The explosion of information, expanding of technology (especially mobile technology), and complexity of healthcare environment present medical librarians and medical libraries opportunities and challenges. To live up with the opportunities and challenges, what kinds of skill sets or information structure do medical librarians or medical libraries are required to have or acquire so as to be strong partners or contributors of continuing effectiveness to the changing environment?

MLASR6: Who we are: https://plus.google.com/communities/115832551443909297773

MLASR6: Emerging Technologies Mindmap: http://www.mindmeister.com/275111357/mla-emerging-technologies

As part of this process, the group (chaired by THL librarian Patricia Anderson) has a survey and is hosting Twitter chats and other events to try to discover what emerging technologies means both to other librarians and to the communities served by medical libraries. The first Twitter chat on this topic was last night, Thursday, August 8, 2013.

The main technologies highlighted in the conversation were 3D printing and bioprinting, augmented reality, data visualization and big data, Google Glass, medical devices, near field communication, quantified self, and wearable technology. The conversation also included issues such as the digital divide, accessibility, and global access, as well as significant insightful conversation about the economics of emerging tech, roles for librarians, and the importance of having a clear vision of the enterprise goals and purpose as a context for developing new areas of service.



What do you think medical librarians should know about emerging technologies? Fill in the survey and tell us! For more of the conversation, supporting links, and related information, see the Storify:

Medical Librarians Take On Emerging Technology: http://storify.com/pfanderson/medical-librarians-take-on-emerging-technology


First posted to the THL BLog: http://wp.me/p1v84h-1o4