Beginning to Make Health [#makehealth]

Cool Toys Pic of the Day - Maker Movement Meets Healthcare
Cool Toys Pic of the Day – Maker Movement Meets Healthcare

In the blog series “Health Fair Meet Maker Faire” (parts one, two, and three), I was talking about the exciting idea of looking at commonalities between the maker movement and the shifting landscape of patient engagement in healthcare.

We went wild with brainstorming and excitement. I’ll share more of the ideas we developed here in the next post on #makehealth. (Oh, #makehealth is our hashtag. Feel free to use it, and we’ll be tracking it.) At that time, no one had done a health-themed Maker Faire, but what we didn’t know was that there were some others in the works. After all, as we had noticed, it seemed like a really obvious idea! Evidently so. We did immediately notice the collection of health-themed maker events collected by Make Media.

Maker Faire: Health: http://makerfaire.com/category/science/health/

I took the just the first page of their entries and looked at the subject headings used for those to get an idea of the topics being tied into health makering.

3D Printing
Arduino
Art & Design
Bicycles
Biology
Biotech
Craft
Crochet
Culture
DIY Projects
Education
Electronics
Energy
Engineering
Food
Fun & Games
Gadgets
Getting Started
GPS
Hacks
Hands On
Health
Home
Invention
Kids & Family
Knitting
Maker < 18yo.
Makerspaces
Media
Open Source Hardware
Raspberry Pi
Robotics
Science
Scratch
Sewing
Start Up
Sustainability
Toys
Wearables
Writing
Young Makers

Pretty cool list, isn't it? Really, you should go explore their collection. For me, the coolest one to find was the post about MakerNurse.

Makers in the Nursing Unit: Lessons Learned from America’s Amazing MakerNurses: http://makerfaire.com/makers/makers-in-the-nursing-unit-what-weve-learned-across-america-finding-amazing-makernurses/

Whoa! What great stuff!

RWJF: Seeking DIY Nurses – New MakerNurse Initiative Launches http://www.rwjf.org/en/blogs/pioneering-ideas/2013/09/seeking_diy_nurses.html

The MakerNurse group partnered with Maimonides Medical Center to have the VERY FIRST health-themed maker faire!

A Hospital Mini-Maker Faire: http://makezine.com/2014/05/30/a-hospital-mini-maker-faire/

Facebook: Maimonides Medical Mini Maker Faire: https://www.facebook.com/MaimonidesMedicalCenterMakerFaire

Now, pause for a moment, and think, “What would YOU want to see in a health Maker Faire?” Here are just a few posts and tweets about what MakerNurse has been up to. Have any more ideas?


Makers in the Nursing Unit: Lessons Learned from America’s Amazing MakerNurses – Jose Gomez-Marquez http://www.youtube.com/embed/iQkQabDKoFY

CLASSIC MAKERNURSE: ADDING A SPLASH OF COLOR TO THE ORTHO WARD: http://makernurse.org/2014/01/20/classic-makernurse-color-ortho/

MADE BY A MAKERNURSE: IV SHIELD: http://makernurse.org/2014/05/22/made-by-a-makernurse-iv-shield/

RWJF PIONEERING IDEAS PODCAST: FEATURING 3 MAKERNURSES: http://makernurse.org/2014/05/31/pioneering-ideas-podcast-featuring-3-makernurses/

MakerNurse: The Stealth Ingenuity of Inventive Nurses in America http://makerfaire.com/makers/making-for-health-medical-making-around-the-world-and-at-home-in-america/

ONC Partners with Dr. Oz to Spread the Word (#BlueButton) — Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of June 16, 2014)

BlueButton on Twitter

The Blue Button was some of the biggest buzz at Health Data Palooza. Following #hdpalooza, the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology partnered with the famous and popular media personality, Dr. Oz through his affiliated service, ShareCare, to co-sponsor a Twitter chat about the Blue Button and what it can do for the American people. For those who haven’t already heard, the Blue Button is a tool for accessing your personal health records.

I’m taking this opportunity to also show you some special Twitter search features and how they work. Today, I’ll cluster the examples by type of search, and in Part 2, I’ll show how to do these special searches.

REGULAR SEARCH

SEARCH PHOTOS

SEARCH VIDEOS

SEARCH NEWS

SEARCH LINKS


First posted at THL Blog: http://thlibrary.wordpress.com/2014/06/17/onc-partners-with-dr-oz-to-spread-the-word-bluebutton-hashtags-of-the-week-hotw-week-of-june-16-2014/

Infographic of the Week: Learning in the Digital Age—“I Was Pleasantly Surprised”

Infographics in research articles?
Jeffrey Bartholet. Student Poll: “I Was Pleasantly Surprised.” Special Report: Learning In The Digital Age. Scientific American (2013) 309:72-73.
http://www.nature.com/scientificamerican/journal/v309/n2/full/scientificamerican0813-72.html PDF:

I was indeed surprised when I stumbled on this research article, went to read it, noticed the image thumbnail, and thought, “Oh, my goodness, that looks like an infographic!” And it was! We’ve been talking about infographics a lot lately. Our library is talking about the roles we could play as librarians in supporting infographic development for our institution and faculty. There were multiple presentations about infographics at last month’s Medical Library Association Annual Meeting. Also in the past couple months I’ve attended a few presentations about uses of infographics to promote research findings, for marketing, or health literacy outreach. But I had not noticed that infographics have crept into the actual published and printed versions of scholarly research articles!

This one was about MOOCs, which is another interest. I’ve taken (read “lurked in”) several MOOCs, without ever completing one. I have learned useful skills relevant to my job from a MOOC, but when push came to shove between the MOOC and my real life, real life won. Or just feeling tired won. This summer is different. My son and I are taking a MOOC together, watching the videos together, discussing the assignments while we do them. I’m going to be really embarrassed if my son finishes and I don’t. I’ll be even MORE embarrassed if I bomb out and my son takes that as an excuse for him to quit. So I was very interested in this piece of research on how MOOCs are used in science education.

“One in five science students surveyed by Nature and Scientific American has participated in a MOOC—and most would do so again”

It’s worth reading the whole short article. Here are just a couple small snippets highlighting key points.

PRO:
Stefan Kühn: “I started the course because of personal interest … and was pleasantly surprised when I realized I was using it for my write-ups as well.”

CON:
Kathleen Nicoll: “Although some classes try to mimic research experiences in a virtual lab, that cannot substitute ‘for smelling formaldehyde or seeing something almost explode in your face and having to react to that.'”

PRO:
Kathleen Nicoll: “One of the huge upsides is that MOOCs can reach everyone [with a computer and Internet]—people who are differently abled, people behind bars in prison.”

CON:
Jeffrey Bartholet: “Because failure is cost-free in a MOOC, the basic human tendency toward procrastination and sloth are stronger than in traditional classes.”

PRO:
Shannon Bohle: “I like to share with my friends that I finished the course and hear everyone say, ‘Oh, you’re so brilliant. Kudos to you!'”

It also didn’t hurt my interest at all to hear about what specific courses these students and faculty found useful. I might actually want to take the one recommended by Kühn, Think Again. The infographic itself also contained some surprises. I didn’t realize that any universities were requiring MOOC participation for their residential students! Or maybe I’m misinterpreting that question? It made sense that people find superior career value from taking classes face-to-face. Hard to make a connection in a MOOC that could turn into a person willing to write a letter of reference for you. But it was surprising how the perception of learning value was almost equal! Here’s the infographic – what surprises you?

MOOCs: I Was Pleasantly Surprised
Image source: Scientific American

Health Fair Meet Maker Faire! Part 3: Our Announcement!!

You saw Part One, in which the idea was born, and Part Two, in which the concept was tested and proven. So what actually happened? We’re doing it. We’re really DOING IT! By “it” I mean a health-themed maker faire/fest at the University of Michigan. REALLY!

WHAT:

We Make Health
We Make Health: http://makehealth.us

Emily Puckett Rogers had given us a heads-up about requirements for working with the official Maker Faire folk, which I had not realized was an actual brand name. So we don’t yet know if this is going to be a Mini-Maker Faire or a Maker Fest or what, but it is definitely happening!

Please note that the We Make Health event is a project of Health Design By Us, a participatory behavior change project funded as part of the UM Provost’s Third Century Initiative. It’s a completely awesome and wonderful collaboration, and you’ll be hearing more about it if you read this blog regularly.

WHEN:

Saturday, August 16, 2014

We are still settling on what happens when during the day. We are brainstorming roughly 10am to 6pm, but that may change.

WHERE:

Google Map for Palmer Commons
Palmer Commons: https://www.google.com/maps/place/100+Washtenaw+Ave/@42.2807486,-83.7335814,17z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m2!3m1!1s0x883cae4266554837:0x732dcfa6f8fb7dbe

WHO:

Joyce Lee, Doctor as DesignerPF Anderson, Self Portrait as ShadowMatt Kenyon, Artist

Us! We!

Well, Joyce Lee, Matt Kenyon, and I are taking point on planning the project (with the capable assistance of Emily Hirschfeld). Joyce is from the UM Medical School and Mott Children’s Hospital, Matt is with the School of Art and Design, and I, of course, am part of the University Libraries, Taubman Health Sciences Library. However, we have an email list for folk interested in the event which currently has over 90 people signed up. Many of them have contributed ideas, suggested contacts, volunteered to do booths or presentations, and so forth. We are reaching out to many community maker communities, and have received endorsements from several of them. You’ll hear more about our partners as the event moves closer.

CONTACTS:

1) Sign up at the We Make Health web site to receive information and updates from the Health Design By Us project.

2) If you are part of the University of Michigan, you can sign up through M-Community for the MakeHealthUM email list.

3) If you want to contact the event coordinators, our Make Health Team, you can reach us at: MAKEHEALTH at-sign UMICH dot EDU.

4) Twitter! The event itself is on twitter, as is Health Design By Us.

Make Health: @MakeHealthUM
Health Design By Us: @HealthByUs

If you want to chat with Joyce or me individually, we are also pretty easily reached through Twitter:

Joyce: @joyclee
Patricia: @pfanderson

5) Please feel free to comment on this post! We will have a blog for the actual event, but that’s still being set up. More soon!

WHAT’S NEXT:

What’s coming next is more blogposts and more news! We will highlight some of the technologies and people that will be highlighted at our event, the partners we’re working with, and exciting spinoff projects to help the energy last beyond the actual event. We’ll tell you more about some of the other folk working on health maker events, and other maker communities around the University and the Ann Arbor community.

UM Plays a Part in National News Around #CerebralPalsySwagger — Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of June 9, 2014)

The Cerebral Palsy Swagger
Cerebral Palsy Swagger: https://www.facebook.com/cerebralpalsyswagger

It doesn’t happen that often that a Twitter hashtag about health blows up into a national news story, and even less often that this will happen with an event hinged around the University of Michigan! Many thanks to my colleague Anna Schnitzer for bringing this to my attention, and please excuse us if this post is a little more “feel good” than usual. The story is about two brothers, Hunter and Braden Gandee, who went on a journey last weekend to raise awareness about cerebral palsy. 7-yr-old Braden was carried by his 14-yr-old brother, Hunter, for 40 miles, from the Michigan-Ohio border to the University of Michigan Bahna Wrestling Center in Ann Arbor. The news loved it, beginning with local stories (M-Go Blue, and MLive), then taking off across the US, from the Detroit Free Press to Fox News, NBC News, People Magazine, the Today Show, and even ESPN and Canada! And here comes the buzz from Twitter (mostly pictures, with reactions from real people around the country).


First posted at THL Blog: http://thlibrary.wordpress.com/2014/06/10/um-plays-a-part-in-national-news-around-cerebralpalsyswagger-hashtags-of-the-week-hotw-week-of-june-9-2014/

Infographic of the Week: Logical Fallacies

Your Logical Fallacy Is ...

Oh, the debates, the DEBATES! I don’t think a week goes by, often not even a day goes by, without the issue arising of the importance of critical thinking in health literacy. With respect to patients, this goes back at least hundreds of years.

“Grant that my patients have confidence in me and my art and follow my directions and my counsel. Remove from their midst all charlatans and the whole host of officious relatives and know-all nurses, cruel people who arrogantly frustrate the wisest purposes of our art and often lead Thy creatures to their death.” Daily Prayer of a Physician, attributed to Maimonides, but probably written by Marcus Herz. This prayer first appeared in print in 1793. https://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/Judaism/mdprayer.html

Don’t assume, however, that this applies only to patients or the public — it comes up just as often in the context of clinicians, faculty, researchers, and students. Especially students. You probably remember the famous quote misattributed to Socrates about the failings of the “younger generation.”

“The children now love luxury; they have bad manners, contempt for authority; they show disrespect for elders and love chatter in place of exercise. Children are now tyrants, not the servants of their households. They no longer rise when elders enter the room. They contradict their parents, chatter before company, gobble up dainties at the table, cross their legs, and tyrannize their teachers.” Wikiquote: Youth Nowadayshttp://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Youth_nowadays

The parallel in medical education is the claim that the students have never learned to think critically, that they trust what they read without considering its potential flaws, that they lack the skills to examine the credibility of a piece of research, and so forth. The first time I remember hearing this was a few months into my first professional job from an Asian-American faculty emeritus at Northwestern’s Medical School. It was one of his favorite topics, and I heard it a lot. As a librarian, I tend to stand still and listen when the faculty emeritus start talking, and I’ve learned a lot that way. While he was the first, he was far from the last, and the topic has come up over and over again at all levels from many types of people, and in venues from face-to-face to professional presentations to informal Twitter chats and Facebook comments, alongside the parallel claim that medical faculty don’t know how to teach.

“Equally with the school as an organization, the teacher has felt deeply the changed conditions in medical education, and many of us are much embarrassed to know what and how to teach…. To winnow the wheat from the chaff and to prepare it in an easily digested shape for the tender stomachs of first and second year students taxes the resources of the most capable teacher.” William Osler, 1899. http://profiles.nlm.nih.gov/ps/access/GFBBVZ.pdf

In the context of all of this, I found this week’s infographic, Thou Shalt Not Commit Logical Fallacies,” not only delightful, but also so useful that when it comes down from my door it is going up on the wall inside my office! I’m hoping to use it as a kind of checklist against which to check my ideas for sound reasoning. Chances are I won’t do this as often as I should, but even doing it occasionally should be helpful in the long run. One of the things I like about the web site is that it goes beyond the infographic distillation of concepts, and gives more details about each logical flaw individually.

Your Logical Fallacy Is ... Slippery Slope

Slippery Slope is one I see used a great deal these days in conversations around personal genomics, but that’s a topic for another day. For now, I hope you enjoy “Your Logical Fallacy Is … “

Thou Shalt Not Commit Logical Fallacies, (a.k.a. “Your Logical Fallacy Is”) https://yourlogicalfallacyis.com/

Health Fair Meet Maker Faire! Part Two

GO-Tech Meeting at Maker Works

In yesterday’s Part One post, I left this with me trying to decide what ideas were most important to show Barbara Stripling. I had drafted a looooong blogpost on April 15th, and showed it to my friend and colleague, Kate Saylor on April 16th. Kate and I were digging around in the post, and the question came up of looking at health maker faires. I didn’t think there had been one. The conversation went something like this.

“Really?”
“Really.”
“Hmmm, that’s odd.”
“Let’s look.”
“Good idea. If anyone can find it, you can.”
“OMG, I can’t find any! Look! There are ones on sustainability, and green living, and one which include health booths, but I can’t find ANY actually themed around health!”
“REALLY?!”
“We have to do this.”
“We TOTALLY have to do this.”
“WOW.” “WOW.

The next person called was Emily Puckett Rogers, another librarian who is one of the leaders behind the Ann Arbor Mini-Maker Faire. She had a LOT of good ideas and information. We brainstormed a while, and then the next step was to start talking with other people to get more ideas. The following day, April 17th, I started a shared spreadsheet in Google Drive for folk to share ideas and collect them in one place. Word spread across campus like wildfire, and many people were making edits. The first week I kept the doc open and just kept watching in astonishment as people across campus kept logging in and out of the file.

April 18th I had a meeting with Joyce Lee about another mutual project. As we walked out of the meeting, I was telling her about this idea. Her reaction was along the lines of, “Isn’t this what we are trying to do? We should do this! We should sponsor this!” And we were off and running.

We started out brainstorming what sort of topics were a good fit for a health maker fair or festival. Oh, there are plenty, and for almost all of them someone would know of a local person doing work with that tech. At this point what I wanted to do was prove the viability of the concept by taking things I’d seen from maker fairs I’d attended and sifting out those with any kind of health relevance. I tried to distill those examples down into a few categories with just a few examples each, but leaving enough conceptual wiggle room to imply some of the other possibilities. The framework I came up with (yes, I know, I’m the acronym queen) is CLASP.

CLASP
* Creativity
* Literacy
* Access
* Sustainability
* Personal Problemsolving

The core ideas contained in CLASP apply to all makerspaces, not just the health aspects. There is also a lot of overlap in the ideas themselves. Typically, each example will include all the concepts. I’m just using this as a tool to help me organize and prioritize the examples I’ve collected.

CREATIVITY

GO-Tech Meeting at Maker WorksAnn Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2013
Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2013 Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2013

One of the things I adore about the Maker Movement is the way people come up with their own solutions to their own problems, as individuals and as a community, through exploration, innovation, experimentation, and creation. Patient communities have been doing the same sort of thing — sharing problems and solutions, brainstorming, turning solutions into marketable products, and more. I’ve been deeply inspired and impressed with the prosthetic solutions coming from 3D printing, from Robohand & Roboleg to the beautiful prosthetic limbs (see the work done by Sophie de Oliveira and Scott Summit).

Closer to home, many people with injuries or conditions that effect mobility find themselves struggling to get in and out of clothes on their own, something that happened to me last year with my shoulder injury. The solutions can be unique to an individual, based on range of motion, grip strength, fine motor control, and other factors. Resources like sewing machines, CAD/CAM tools for modeling, and sergers can be critical to those solutions. Other persons may find healing through something as simple as a beautiful work of art, and the lights and wooden star shown here can be mentally soothing, stimulating, engaging, calming, or a source of meditation and focus. The idea of book binding connects to health, for me, as I encourage patients with a new diagnosis or long-term condition to keep their own notebook about their symptoms, treatments, meetings with providers, questions asked, answers given, etcetera. Being able to customize and personalize your own book makes it more meaningful. I don’t know, maybe this is overkill, or maybe it is the start of a great idea.

LITERACY

Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2013 Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2013 Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2013: Eli Neiberger of AADL Detroit Maker Faire 2013

I’ve never been to a maker faire where I didn’t encounter a librarian. Literacy is a big deal for librarians, and health literacy is a big deal in health care. Your standard health fair is focused around health literacy — communicating the basics around important health topics and common conditions, as well as best practices for prevention. But most of the interaction is one-sided. Health fair attendees pick up fliers and sometimes ask questions, but it isn’t literacy in the way that maker faires handle it. In maker faires, literacy isn’t just “what is it” and “let me tell you what to do.” Literacy becomes “how can I do this myself” and “what skills do I need to take this to the next level” and “what is possible if I [fill in the blank].” Literacy includes playing games to actively engage with a topic as well as building things and identifying what you need to know to achieve your own goals.

In these images, there is a librarian wearing a “Dig into reading” tshirt while she assists at a booth teaching soldering skills; a larger than lifesize version of the Operation board game which can be used to teach hand-eye coordination as well as humorously presented anatomical concepts; another librarian connecting gaming to science and technology fundamentals; and a young scientist showing science products and presenting science literacy concepts. You can’t see it in this picture, but in another image, the same young scientist shows off 3d printed laboratory equipment.

ACCESS

23andMe Celiac Disease Risk Markers
Pebble Pals

In libraries we tend to think of access to information (ie. books and journals) first and foremost. Next we think of access to the buildings, and accessible design. With online information, we think of web accessibility. When we talk about the digital divide we mean access to certain types of technology and networking. With makerspaces we think of access to completely different types of technology. Somewhere along the line we usually mention the skills needed to use these things, but I’m not sure that skills are considered part of the challenge of access. I’m thinking the question of access may be bigger than any of these, and in healthcare, there may be portions of access that are broader and/or narrower than what we usually consider.

The first image above is a snippet from one of my 23andMe health reports. Yeah, the ones that the FDA has told them not to do anymore. Luckily, I got in before that happened. This is just a tiny part of an idea. What’s important isn’t just access to personalized genomics information, or to 23andMe, or even to the health reports. What’s important is a bigger challenge — that the increasing demands on the healthcare system are driving more engagement by and with patients, and there are needs and demands for a very type of information than has usually been made available about health for people who are not medical professionals. There is a need for access to tools and skills that have traditionally fallen outside the purview of the patient.

The second image is of Pebble watches, a wearable technology tool that connects to smart phones and sensors and can be used for games and utility, but also for personal health management. The Maker Movement philosophy has come to healthcare in a HUGE way, and shows no signs of going away. Not only does healthcare need to acknowledge and accept this, but also needs to support, provide access to skills and training, create tools for integrating personal data with electronic health records, and beyond. There are ‘new’ buzzwords giving a glimpse into some of what we could be doing and what might fit into healthcare makerspaces and healthcare maker faires. Here are just a few.

Participatory medicine
individualized medicine
personalized medicine
personal genomics
quantified self
self-trackers
n=1 studies
DIY biology
biohacking
microbiomics
sensors
wearable technology

I don’t know about you, but my brain is going, “Whoa.” How on earth has this not already happened in a HUGE way?

SUSTAINABILITY

Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2013 Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2013: "Be My Sunshine" Heart Box Pic of the day - Vinegars & Pickles Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2013

Hang around with folk in public health for any length of time at all and you start hearing about diet management, outreach, food deserts, community health, environmental health, risk science, and related concepts. An awful lot of what happens in public health is trying to help people and communities develop better ways to create healthy places and lifestyles. This can be growing urban gardens, canning your own produce, putting in solar-powered energy cells, making your own sensors to detect air pollution, and much much more. This is a huge area for connecting what’s happening in maker communities with public health.

PERSONAL PROBLEMSOLVING

Cool Toys Pic of the Day - Maker Movement Meets Healthcare Cool Toys Pic of the Day - Maker Movement Meets Healthcare Detroit Maker Faire 2013 Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2013

We all have problems, we all have challenges in our lives. People with chronic health conditions or caring for someone with a chronic health condition maybe have more, but we can all benefit from skills to help us identify problems, brainstorm possible solutions, and design ways to implement those solutions whether by ourselves or in collaboration with other talented folk. In the Maker Movement, there are a lot of examples of people helping other people to create solutions for both interesting and ordinary problems. Spoons that are easier to grip, glasses that don’t wobble when your hands shake, shoes that sense obstructions you can’t see and warn you, sensors as jewelry or tattoos to monitor your vital signs — these are all examples of creative solutions to personal problems, and there are a LOT more examples out there.

So, are you in? Want to help? When do we start?