More on Obamacare & Youth


PBS: Conversation: “Health Care Reform,” The Comic Book: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sy-FQcXe1Lk

After yesterday’s post about the Obamacare Vloggers, I thought, “OMG, I wasn’t thinking about MY kid and Obamacare! He’s over 18. Is HE supposed to be registering?” You see, I just assumed that because he is on my own health insurance that it’s not relevant to him. But is it? There is a lot in the news right now about Obamacare (Accountable Care Act) and youth, but it is pretty confusing and contradictory. The video at the head of the post is about a graphic novel by Jonathan Gruber that attempts to make it clear.

Book cover

Gruber’s graphic novel / comic book about Obamacare.

Gruber’s graphic novel is available on campus through the libraries, if you wish to see a copy before deciding to buy, as well as at the local public library.

Health care reform : what it is, why it’s necessary, how it works / Jonathan Gruber, with HP Newquist ; illustrated by Nathan Schreiber. At UM: http://mirlyn.lib.umich.edu/Record/011279722 At AADL: http://www.aadl.org/catalog/record/1400708

I’m guessing there are probably also copies in local bookstores.

So, all this confusing information out there. What kind of conversation is it? There are a lot of people saying the ACA is bad for youth, is good for youth, and so forth. It’s interesting that Forbes has pieces on both sides of the debate, making it even less simple to decide. Of course, a lot of analysts are interested in the WHY of the dynamic. For me, being an economics ignoramus, the most persuasive and relevant information was in the graphic novel and my favorite infographic on the topic (not sure what that says about me!).

Infographic: How the Affordable Care Act Affects Young Adults

“There’s a scare campaign underway to make young adults worried about their health care costs.”

“The big question for young people is, ‘should I buy health insurance?’ If you have coverage either through work, the government, private insurance or are under 27 and covered under your parents policy, then you don’t need to buy health insurance.” How the Affordable Care Act Affects Young Adults http://obamacarefacts.com/obamacare-young-adults.php

Luckily there are also some resources along the lines of Healthcare Insurance 101. Obviously, you’ll want to make your own decision, but here are some of the links I’ve been looking at while exploring this question.

OBAMACARE GOOD FOR YOUTH

Ezra Klein. Why Obamacare is good for young people. Washington Post August 19, 2013 at 11:06 am. http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2013/08/19/why-obamacare-is-good-for-young-people/?clsrd

Anne Johnson. Obamacare Will Save Young Americans Money — Pure and Simple. Policy Mic October 7, 2013. http://www.policymic.com/articles/66661/obamacare-will-save-young-americans-money-pure-and-simple

Todd Essig. Let’s Get Personal: Obamacare Really Is Good For The Young And Healthy. Forbes 9/29/2013 @ 12:45PM. http://www.forbes.com/sites/toddessig/2013/09/29/lets-get-personal-obamacare-really-is-good-for-the-young-and-healthy/

OBAMACARE BAD FOR YOUTH

Napala Pratini. 4 Reasons That Young Adults Won’t Sign Up for the Affordable Care Act. NerdWallet March 1, 2014.
http://abcnews.go.com/Business/top-reasons-young-adults-sign-affordable-care-act/story?id=22690267

Chris Conover. No, Obamacare Is Not A Good Deal For Young People In The Long Run, Not Even Close. Forbes 8/23/2013 @ 6:00AM. http://www.forbes.com/sites/theapothecary/2013/08/23/no-obamacare-is-not-a-good-deal-for-young-people-in-the-long-run-not-even-close/

Rituparna Basu. Obamacare Is Really, Really Bad For You, Especially If You’re Young. Frobes 8/21/2013 @ 8:00AM. http://www.forbes.com/sites/realspin/2013/08/21/obamacare-is-really-really-bad-for-you-especially-if-youre-young/

OVERVIEW SOURCES

Christian Science Monitor (CSM) has a really useful set of articles on “Obamacare 101.” My favorite parts are for college students, those who already have insurance, and those who don’t want insurance. Policy Mic also has an overview, although not was well structured and robust as the CSM one.

Obamacare 101: What to know if you already have health insurance: http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/DC-Decoder/2013/0930/Obamacare-101-What-to-know-if-you-already-have-health-insurance

Obamacare 101: What college students need to know: http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/DC-Decoder/2013/1002/Obamacare-101-What-college-students-need-to-know

Obamacare 101: What to know if you opt out of buying health insurance: http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/DC-Decoder/2013/1001/Obamacare-101-What-to-know-if-you-opt-out-of-buying-health-insurance

Jake Horowitz. Health Care 101: The Complete Rundown Of Obamacare You’ve Been Looking For. Policy Mic December 4, 2013. http://www.policymic.com/articles/75475/health-care-101-the-complete-rundown-of-obamacare-you-ve-been-looking-for

Healthcare.gov

HOW TO SIGN UP

Last, but not least, how the heck do you sign up anyway? Officially, you do so at the Healthcare.gov website, but there are ways to do so even if you don’t have access to a computer, or have problems with the website.

Obamacare 101: Seven ways you can sign up, despite Web woes: http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/DC-Decoder/2013/1022/Obamacare-101-Seven-ways-you-can-sign-up-despite-Web-woes/Pick-up-the-phone

“And I said, ‘Yeah, man. Totally!’”: The Obamacare Vloggers


NicePeterToo: I Met the President: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vEcxXDWqs-A

You really should watch the video embedded above. Last week, President Obama invited several of the young folk with exceptionally active Youtube channels to come visit and talk with him about ideas for how to really use Youtube effectively to get out information about the Affordable Care Act. Now, I say “young folk” from my perspective as an admitted old fogie who remembers life before the Internet existed. I mean, really, before punch card programming. OLD fogie!

Anyway, we spend a lot of time in in various online healthcare communities talking about the power of social media for outreach. We all know that Obama works with masters in using social media effectively, and I’ve blogged about that here many times ([1], [2], [3], [4], [5], [6], [7]). Well, he’s done it again!

Last week, President Obama invited a variety of influential Youtube voices to the White House, asking them to help him reach the American youth to enroll in health insurance programs before the March 31st deadline.

Montage: The Obamacare Vloggers

“Attending the meeting were Hannah Hart, creator of the Drunk Kitchen series; Iman Crosson, an Obama impersonator known online as Alphacat; Michael Stephens, the man behind the YouTube channel “VSauce;” Benny and Rafi Fine, creators of the “Kids React” series; Mark Douglas, Todd Womack, and Ben Relles, who introduced the world to Obama Girl six years ago; Peter Shuckoff and Lloyd Ahlquist of “Epic Rap Battles of History” and Tyler Oakley, an LGBT rights advocate with millions of online fans.”
Obama Enlisted YouTube Personalities For Final Health Care Enrollment Push Last Week: The president asked viral video creators to help boost Obamacare enrollment ahead of the March 31 deadline at a White House summit last week. http://www.buzzfeed.com/evanmcsan/obama-enlisted-youtube-personalities-for-final-health-care-e

Another brilliant use of social media. My kid regularly watches about half of these, which means so do I (and, as an aside, you REALLY might enjoy the new “Kids React to Rotary Phones” which made me ROFL. Really. And made my kid ask me if I know what a rotary phone is. Really). That’s what the introductory video is for this post — famous vlogger NicePeter introducing the topic of why and how he met the President, in real people language, and promising more to come. I can’t wait to see what he says, and the other vloggers! Nice Peter looks to be the first of the group to get a video out, but some of them have added this link to existing videos.

Tell a Friend: Get Covered
Tell a Friend: Get Covered: http://www.tellafriendgetcovered.com

Now, WHY Obama is doing this is the million dollar question. Literally. Well, at least that much, probably a lot more. You see, the logic behind pretty much all health insurance plans is that you have LOT of people in the plan, of all ages and all types of health, and then the need for resources will average out over the groups. So to make this work, you need young folk and old, healthy and not-so-healthy. If that doesn’t happen, well, the whole system breaks down, or costs everyone more money than was expected. The way my budget works, those two things amount to pretty much the same problem.

“He needs them to buy health insurance, and, in some cases, spend hundreds of dollars a month for it. If they don’t, the new insurance marketplaces — the absolute core of Obamacare — will be filled with older, sicker people, and premiums will skyrocket. And if that happens, the law will fail.” Obama’s last campaign: Inside the White House plan to sell Obamacare:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2013/07/17/obamas-last-campaign-inside-the-white-house-plan-to-sell-obamacare/

You’ve probably already figured out that there must be a problem getting young folk to register for Obamacare. Well, it’s true. Sort of. There is a genuine need for more young folk to enroll, but the data about what’s going on is both worrisome and hopeful. Look at the title of this piece.

Bruce Japsen. Less Than A Third Of Enrollees In Obamacare Under Age 34. Forbes 1/13/2014 @ 5:23PM. http://www.forbes.com/sites/brucejapsen/2014/01/13/less-than-one-third-of-obamacare-enrollees-are-under-34/

That is based on enrollment data from the government, and if you read the article, it’s actually fairly positive about youth liking Obamacare and just waiting to enroll because, you know, they’re young, and that’s ‘how they roll.’ Here’s last quarter’s enrollment data.

Figure 2: Trends in the Number of Youth Who Have Selected an Obamacare Plan

During December, there was a more than 8-fold increase in the number of young adults (ages 18-34) who have selected a Marketplace plan through the FFM.


ASPE: Health Insurance Marketplace: January Enrollment Report: For the period: October 1, 2013 – December 28, 2013: http://aspe.hhs.gov/health/reports/2014/MarketPlaceEnrollment/Jan2014/ib_2014jan_enrollment.pdf

The next logical question might be, well, why is he doing this so late? Didn’t the Obama team think of reaching out to youth before it got so late? Actually, they’ve been reaching out for quite a while. I’ll post several examples below. The gist of this late push is that even though the numbers are rising, and the expectation was that youth would probably register late, there have been some unfortunate snafus (such as the web page being down on the day of the biggest push for youth enrollment) and that the expected lateness makes for a bit of nervousness and a desire to ensure that the idea of “registering late” doesn’t end up meaning, “Oops! I forgot!” After all, there are consequences to forgetting, both for the youth as individuals and for the good of the entire program.

OBAMA REACHING OUT TO YOUTH

Obama pitches Affordable Care Act to youth at White House Published on Dec 4, 2013

Obamacare: What if not enough young, healthy people enroll? (+video)
The 18-to-34-year-old cohort is the most coveted for the exchanges, and should be about one-third of enrollees, though there are backstops if enrollment falls short.
By Linda Feldmann, Staff writer / December 5, 2013
http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/DC-Decoder/2013/1205/Obamacare-What-if-not-enough-young-healthy-people-enroll-video

Evan McMorris-Santoro. Youth Obamacare Enrollment Groups Surprised To Learn Obamacare Website Won’t Work On National Youth Enrollment Day: “Obviously, it’s unfortunate,” says one youth enrollment leader. The Obama administration is giving applicants who save applications on Feb. 15 extra time to work around downtime on the site. Buzzfeed posted on February 12, 2014 at 3:13pm EST. http://www.buzzfeed.com/evanmcsan/youth-obamacare-enrollment-groups-surprised-to-learn-obamaca

David Morgan. Obamacare enrollment push for the young enters 11th hour. Reuters Fri Feb 14, 2014 1:02am EST
http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/02/14/us-usa-healthcare-enrollment-idUSBREA1D06X20140214

Adam Aigner-Treworgy and Jim Acosta. Obamacare enrollment hits 4 million, push underway to hit revised goal. CNN February 25th, 2014 08:48 PM ET, Updated 8:48 p.m. ET, 2/25/2014. http://politicalticker.blogs.cnn.com/2014/02/25/obamacare-enrollment-hits-4-million-push-underway-to-hit-revised-goal/

Get Covered (with NBA Star Kevin Johnson) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vndF-I4Cq5k

Future Day — Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of March 3, 2014)

xkcd: Simple Answers

Simple answers to the questions that get asked about every new technology

This past weekend, March 1st, was the second annual celebration of Future Day. As an emerging technologies person, I try to pay attention to this. While the primary hashtag was #FutureDay, there were several others that seemed to pop up along with it, of which some of the more interesting ones included:

#4futr
#futr
#futureday
#FutureOfHealth
#STEAM3
#studentneeds2025

The topics I saw highlighted on Twitter were general views on the future and the future of education. I was able to find content about the future of health, but it took digging and most of the health content was published before the actual event. Next year, I’d love to see more of the health care community organizing events and conversations about the future of health using the official Future Day as a starting point!


Future Day

FUTURE DAY

The ideas were: destroy malaria; drones save lives; coding literacy; virtual assistants; expansion of social networks; iris scanning security; adoption of 3D printing; benefit corporations; integration of self-tracking data in healthcare; data privacy; sensors you swallow; Google Fiber. The wishlist was: testube food; car-free cities; concussion-proof athletics; nuclear fusion; happiness economy; climate solution; high-speed trains; a working tricorder.


Future Day & Science

FUTURE DAY & HEALTH

The ideas were: fecal transplants; “responsive neurostimulator for intractable epilepsy;” Trimethylamine N-oxide; genomic cancer testing; bionic eyes.


Future Day & Education

FUTURE DAY & EDUCATION


First posted at the THL Blog: http://thlibrary.wordpress.com/2014/03/03/future-day-hashtags-of-the-week-hotw-week-of-march-3-2014/

Between Privacy & Transparency Comes Invisibility & Visibility (Rare Disease Day 2014)

Pic of the day - A Crossbanded Sky

Today is Rare Disease Day 2014. I’ve been an enthusiastic promoter of Rare Disease Day and everything it stands for since the first one on February 29th of 2008. A friend of mine, Denise Silber, was instrumental in the activities behind its beginnings in Europe, and at that time I was intimately involved in my own work life with dentistry and facial difference, where birth defects and rare diseases are often looming concerns for clinicians and caregivers. Since then my work has often dealt with healthcare social media, where issues of privacy and transparency loom large. I’ve been spending a great deal of time in the past year or so thinking deeply about privacy and transparency issues, as part of writing my book chapter for the recent Barbara Fister volume from ALA.

My new book chapter on privacy & transparency
Finding a public voice, Barbara Fister as a case study: http://www.alastore.ala.org/detail.aspx?ID=10691

This morning, catching up on email and Twitter, there were two pieces made me perceive differently the pivotal role of privacy and transparency in healthcare communities, both versions of which ultimately tie into the same foundation.

“For one, letting a website know you’re using a screen reader means running around the web waving a red flag that shouts ‘here, I’m visually impaired or blind!’ at anyone who is willing to look. It would take away the one place where we as blind people can be relatively undetected without our white cane or guide dog screaming at everybody around us that we’re blind or visually impaired, and therefore giving others a chance to treat us like true equals. Because let’s face it, the vast majority of non-disabled people are apprehensive in one way or another when encountering a person with a disability.”
Marco Zehe. Why screen reader detection on the web is a bad thing. http://www.marcozehe.de/2014/02/27/why-screen-reader-detection-on-the-web-is-a-bad-thing/

This highlights the issue of persons being excluded from mainstream society while they are visible, and seeking anonymity or invisibility in order to be accepted and treated “like everyone else.” There are many other examples like this — any condition related to facial difference carries stigma; any condition that makes difference visible (such as wheelchairs or service animals or assistive technology); other social situations that might be visibly connected to stigma, such as race, poverty, gender, gender identity, etc. In this context, visibility is … awkward, and sometimes painful. Or rather, it is the situation of being visible while being made to feel invisible at the same time. Alternatively, if acknowledged as visible, they may be objectified, as a token representative of the disability or stigma, or with the assumption that they are incapable or insufficient in some way. In these communities, people sometimes find that by making themselves differently visible, such as being in online communities, they are no longer put in the position of being pushed into pseudo-invisibility or are given the opportunity to succeed or fail, to contribute based on their own capabilities as an individual, not being judged by their situation or condition or disability.

It is hard not to next think of conditions or situations in which the condition, situation, or context begins with invisiblity — mental health, diabetes, chronic fatigue or chronic pain, many other chronic illnesses. For many of these (and I count myself among them), the person has genuine restrictions on what they can do, but this is not evident to others, who expect the person with the invisible disability to be able to do much more than they really can. It isn’t uncommon to hear “but you look normal.” It isn’t just invisible disabilities, of course, but also the social or cultural context. Did you grow up poor or battered or otherwise traumatized, and now feel as if you don’t ‘belong’? There are times, as a person with invisible disabilities, that I wish I had a sign to say, “Quit laughing at me because I can’t do what you take for granted! Quit expecting me to [fill in the blank]. You don’t understand how hard it is for me because it is easy for you.” Times when I want something that says, don’t expect too much because I’m not as able-bodied as I seem. But that doesn’t last long.

Pic of the day - White Pride

Somewhere in between both of these comes the idea of passing. Passing as white. Passing as straight. Passing as middle class. Passing as healthy. Passing as sane. Passing as “normal.” Those who, visible or invisible, actively seek and cultivate a specific image or identity to project, often less by choice and more by necessity, a need to have a job, health insurance, a safe neighborhood. As long as I can “fake it” as able-bodied, you can bet I will be doing so. Partly for the practical reasons just mentioned, and partly because trying to seem able-bodied makes me actually stronger and extends my endurance in real life.

There is more to the idea of visibility and invisibility in health care. With rare diseases, part of the challenge to diagnosis is the very fact that they are rare. The assumption for most diagnosticians is that the rare condition is unlikely, and that the more likely options should be ruled out first. This is strategically sound and wise, but results often in long drawn out diagnostic processes. THe idea that the diagnosis is a rare disease is almost an invisible idea. Then, after receiving the diagnosis, comes the feeling of being invisible in a health care system designed to support the more common diagnoses. Feeling invisible in the sense of seeing no one around who is “like me.” Feeling invisible because you can’t find someone else who’s life is “like mine.”

Invisible because you can’t find a way to make your life visible. Invisible because the challenges you live with aren’t taken seriously. Invisible in that people look at you and see someone different from who you believe yourself to be. Invisible in that the condition or disability is invisible, and some how you got carried along with it, fading away. Invisible in the sense that your fatigue, or pain, or lack of mobility, or other challenges keep you out of mainstream life; that you can’t afford to go to movies or shows because your meds cost so much; that the largest part of your life is hidden and unseen.

There are times when you want the privacy so you don’t need to explain. And there are times when you wish it was all visible already so you wouldn’t need to explain. Visible, invisible; private, transparent.

“In our case, privacy meant that Maureen’s health information was not visible (or transparent) to the team of oncologists and pathologists at M.D. Anderson as quickly as we needed it to be, so that a diagnosis could be rendered swiftly and a course of treatment commenced immediately. Privacy, without necessary (and user-controlled) transparency, can indeed be the difference between life and death.”
Gary L. Thompson. “A View from the CLOUD: Are Privacy and Transparency on a Collision Course or Two Sides of the Same Coin?” http://www.hl7standards.com/blog/2011/07/27/a-view-from-the-cloud-are-privacy-and-transparency-on-a-collision-course-or-two-sides-of-the-same-coin/

Gary points out some very important issues here. Privacy, unwished for, can be deadly. Transparency, unwished for, can also be deadly, such as for victims of bullying or domestic violence. The invisibility of “rare diseases” in the diagnostic process can slow things down to a dangerous pace. Not knowing what is wrong can be dangerous, can result in ‘treatments’ that make things worse, or at best delay getting better. Not being able to get a diagnosis is isolating and frightening. Looking “normal” when you aren’t can be isolating. Being treated as “invisible” when you aren’t is isolating. Having a rare disease, any rare disease, is isolating. Transparency can do away with parts of the isolation, but then can also open the door to other possible risks.

Until the world becomes a perfect place, we will need both privacy and transparency, we will need the opportunity to choose between them, to shift between visibility and invisibility.


Rare Disease Day 2014

More about Rare Disease Day

Global Genes: http://globalgenes.org/world-rare-disease-day/
NIH: Rare Diseases: http://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/news-and-events/pages/28/rare-disease-day
Rare Disease Day US: http://rarediseaseday.us
Rare Disease Day US: Map: http://rarediseaseday.us/events/rare-disease-day-2014-countdown/
NORD (National Organization of Rare Diseases): https://www.rarediseases.org/about/partnerships/rare-disease-day

More on Emerging Technologies in Libraries

Gear: Emerging Technologies

Following up on last week’s post about emerging technologies, I’ve found several other very recent slide decks about emerging technologies in libraries. These range from what’s interesting, what’s being done, how to strategize approaches and adoption, what pays off and what doesn’t, concerns and challenges, and other interesting useful bits.

EXAMPLES IN LIBRARIES

This deck by Jennifer Baxmeyer was developed to support a lecture in a library school course, and seems to have been intended to provide a broad overview of some of the technologies now being used in libraries. It is a rich, long, slide deck with a lot of slides, a lot of examples, and many ideas. It also serves to provide context around the idea of emerging technologies in libraries.


Emerging Technologies for Libraries and Librarians, 2013
by Jennifer Baxmeyer, Leader, Serials and E-Resources Team; Princeton University Library on Aug 01, 2013
http://www.slideshare.net/cellobax/emerging-technologies-for-libraries-and-librarians-2013

STRATEGIES

The most visually engaging and inspiring deck from today’s collection, Samantha Chada’s slides are worth looking at just to try to learn more about making gorgeous slides. What it doesn’t do (as is common with visually beautiful slide decks) is to clearly communicate the content without having the speaker present. Few words. There are fabulous screenshots and examples of ways in which other libraries are using some of these technologies, with a focus on apps, games, cloud computing, and makerspaces. Then she gets really fun and expands with some I’ve been wanting to blog about here – MOOCs, Raspberry Pi, hackathons … I will say that this deck makes me want to sit down with her and chat for a while!


Emerging Technologies in the Library
by Samantha Chada, Associate Director of Technology; Sandusky Library on Feb 18, 2013
http://www.slideshare.net/samchada/emerging-technologies-in-the-library-16601233

ISSUES

I was delighted to see a deck from Michelle Kraft because she always does such thoughtful work, and provides a real world counterbalance to folk like me who want to try everything. She focused on disruption and broader societal change, and how the evolution of the world arounds us leads to needed change in libraries.


Emerging Technologies & Evolving Library
by Michelle Kraft, Medical Librarian; Cleveland Clinic Alumni Library on Oct 04, 2013
http://www.slideshare.net/michellekraft/midwest

CHALLENGES

This might be my favorite of the batch. It appears to be a report out from an analysis of a survey of medical librarians looking at skills, attitudes, training opportunities, and other questions, all presented with nice graphs and charts and data visualizations. I was particularly intrigued by the comparison of the Horizon Report and the Gartner Hype Cycle as to what most interested this demographic. I was also intrigued to see that the interests driving future adoption seemed to be focused on media production skills and educational technologies. The two greatest barriers, by FAR, were lack of time and hospital firewalls. All in all, a very useful deck.


Emerging Technologies in Medical Libraries: Librarian Interest and Perceived Challenges
by Andrea Wright et al, on Mar 20, 2013; NN/LM SE/A Beyond the SE/A March 2013
http://www.slideshare.net/alwright1/emerging-technologies-in-medical-libraries-librarian-interest-and-perceived-challenges

“Smoking & Health” Turns 50 — Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of February 24, 2014)

PT's Half-RezDay Party: Rezday Boy

It’s pretty interesting that there have been so many different reports from the Surgeon General’s Office, but if people simply say, “the Surgeon General’s report” they mean the first one, from 1964, on Smoking and Health. I’m glad to see that the SGO is taking advantage of the 50th anniversary to release a new and updated report as well as sponsoring several events. Of course, there is a hashtag — #SGR50.


First posted at THL BLog: http://thlibrary.wordpress.com/2014/02/24/smoking-health-turns-50-hashtags-of-the-week-hotw-week-of-february-24-2014/

Emerging Technologies in Healthcare: Different Points of View


Emerging Technologies in Healthcare: Different Points of View: http://www.slideshare.net/umhealthscienceslibraries/e-tech-povs

For a staff presentation, reviewing two recent events on the topic of emerging technologies. More detailed information available in these Storify links:

1) Emerging Medicine, Friend or Foe http://storify.com/pfanderson/emerging-technology-in-medicine-friend-or-foe

2) #MedLibs Look at the Horizon Report http://storify.com/pfanderson/medlibs-look-at-the-horizon-report

I loved the talk by Dr. Alex Djuricich for the way in which he both engaged the audience and made a range of new and not so new technologies accessible and relevant for health care providers and students. Of particular interest to me was that Indiana University has been having their folk livetweet Grand Rounds for two years, creating data and analytics for engagement, topics, and more.

The medical librarians conversation really made me proud. They didn’t just sit back and listen to the gurus about tech, but asked hard questions, considered strategies and policies, taking nothing for granted. I was surprised to find how much engagement there was on topics that inspired them, many of which were not included in the actual Horizon Report which we were officially discussing.