Tag Archives: Education

Future Day — Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of March 3, 2014)

xkcd: Simple Answers

Simple answers to the questions that get asked about every new technology

This past weekend, March 1st, was the second annual celebration of Future Day. As an emerging technologies person, I try to pay attention to this. While the primary hashtag was #FutureDay, there were several others that seemed to pop up along with it, of which some of the more interesting ones included:

#4futr
#futr
#futureday
#FutureOfHealth
#STEAM3
#studentneeds2025

The topics I saw highlighted on Twitter were general views on the future and the future of education. I was able to find content about the future of health, but it took digging and most of the health content was published before the actual event. Next year, I’d love to see more of the health care community organizing events and conversations about the future of health using the official Future Day as a starting point!


Future Day

FUTURE DAY

The ideas were: destroy malaria; drones save lives; coding literacy; virtual assistants; expansion of social networks; iris scanning security; adoption of 3D printing; benefit corporations; integration of self-tracking data in healthcare; data privacy; sensors you swallow; Google Fiber. The wishlist was: testube food; car-free cities; concussion-proof athletics; nuclear fusion; happiness economy; climate solution; high-speed trains; a working tricorder.


Future Day & Science

FUTURE DAY & HEALTH

The ideas were: fecal transplants; “responsive neurostimulator for intractable epilepsy;” Trimethylamine N-oxide; genomic cancer testing; bionic eyes.


Future Day & Education

FUTURE DAY & EDUCATION


First posted at the THL Blog: http://thlibrary.wordpress.com/2014/03/03/future-day-hashtags-of-the-week-hotw-week-of-march-3-2014/

University of Michigan Trends & Technology Team, February 2014

I’ve been part of the UM Trends & Tech Team for several years, and have always found it to be one of my most rewarding campus groups. We had a meeting earlier today, and I participated via Google Hangout. People often ask me where I find the cool things I share with others. Well, it isn’t something anyone can do alone. I follow lots of news services, blogs, and similar online resources, but I also depend on great people and communities, like this one.

For today’s meeting, the notes were exceptionally clear, and I was able to catch almost all of the resources mentioned. We had a few main topics, and our usual round-the-table sharing session (which is the best part, in my view). The two topics were badges and project management. While these aren’t explicitly medical or library focused, both are topics of importance to the work we do. Screenshots and links are in the slideshow above. Brief overview descriptions below.

BADGES

The idea of “Badges” is one of the recent innovations in education, and a subset of “gamification,” as mentioned in the new Horizon Report. You’ll understand the idea of Badges if you think of scouting, and the way kids train to win badges in specific skillsets. Here’s the official definition.

“A badge is a symbol or indicator of an accomplishment, skill, quality or interest. From the Boy and Girl Scouts, to PADI diving instruction, to the more recently popular geo-location game, Foursquare, badges have been successfully used to set goals, motivate behaviors, represent achievements and communicate success in many contexts. A “digital badge” is an online record of achievements, tracking the recipient’s communities of interaction that issued the badge and the work completed to get it. Digital badges can support connected learning environments by motivating learning and signaling achievement both within particular communities as well as across communities and institutions. (Source: Erin Knight White Paper)” From: MozillaWiki: https://wiki.mozilla.org/Badges

Here are some of the badges resources our team has found and is discussing. This highly selected set includes examples of how folk are using them, tools to support badge projects, and more.

AADL Summer Game http://play.aadl.org/
Badg.Us http://badg.us/en-US/badges/
Badgelab https://badgelab.herokuapp.com/
BadgeWidgetHack http://badgewidgethack.org/
Credly https://credly.com/
Open Badges http://openbadges.org/
Purdue Passport http://www.itap.purdue.edu/studio/passport/

PROJECT MANAGEMENT

Most of us have some sort of project we’re trying to manage, either at work or at home, even if it only means keeping our own lives a bit more organized. There was a subgroup of the team that has been looking at different project management tools, testing them out, and coming back sharing thoughts on what they like or don’t like. Here is a small group of the tools and add-ons mentioned in today’s meeting.

Asana https://asana.com/
Asana + Box http://blog.asana.com/2014/02/boxintegration/
Asana + M-Box http://www.itcs.umich.edu/storage/box/
Basecamp https://basecamp.com/
Evernote https://evernote.com/
Evernote – Kustomnote https://kustomnote.com/
Evernote – Taskclone http://www.taskclone.com/
Evernote app center http://appcenter.evernote.com/
Evernote Food http://evernote.com/food/
JIRA https://www.atlassian.com/software/jira
Trello https://trello.com/
Zoho https://www.zoho.com/projects/

SHARING

My favorite part of the meetings is always when we go around the table. People share projects they are working on, tools they are using, challenges they are struggling to overcome, tips, tricks, tools, news, updates, and more. Sometimes everyone has already heard about something, sometimes no one has except the person talking about it. Some of the tips were about hardware (Chromecast & Google Cast, DASH, Kitkat, Mophie). Many are always about mobile apps, which our group seems to love. There are usually a few coding tools (Fluid, Codepen). Of course, the best part is hearing what people are doing with all of these (especially the CIO using Ideascale and LSA’s brilliant social media campaign #powerof5), but if I added that in for everything, this post would be way too long. You’ll just have to explore the links on your own, or come to the meetings, eh?

Chromecast http://www.google.com/intl/en-US/chrome/devices/chromecast/
CodePen http://codepen.io
DASH https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/hellobragi/the-dash-wireless-smart-in-ear-headphones
Day One http://dayoneapp.com
DeMobo http://www.demobo.com/product.html
Dial2Do http://www.dial2do.com/
EtcML http://www.etcml.com
Fluid http://fluidapp.com/
Google Cast https://developers.google.com/cast/
HipChat https://www.hipchat.com/
Ideascale https://ideascale.com/
Ideascale for UM http://cesandbox.ideascale.com/
KitKat http://www.android.com/kitkat/
MOPHIE http://www.mophie.com/shop/space-pack-iphone-5s
Netlytic https://netlytic.org/
Paper (53) http://www.fiftythree.com/paper
Paper (Facebook) https://www.facebook.com/paper
Paperpile https://paperpile.com
Powerof5 http://lsapowerof5.tumblr.com/
Powerof5 https://tagboard.com/powerof5
Slack https://slack.com/
UM Staff Stories http://hr.umich.edu/staffstories/category/stories/
Touch Room http://touchroomapp.com
TV Tag (GetGlue) http://tvtag.com/
VSCOCAM https://vsco.co/vscocam

Science Games on Twitter — Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of January 27, 2014)

Games? On Twitter? Oh, my, yes. And the games, while quite entertaining, also foster serious purposes, from engagement in educational outcomes and flipping the classroom to efforts to reimagine the name of peer-review and professional publication. Here are a few examples (#GreenGlam, #SixWordPeerReview, and #PrincessBrideScience), showing beauty, humor, fun, wit, and some rather insightful thoughts.

#GreenGlam

I was struck by the creativity of the #GreenGlam project from the Jahren Lab at the University of Hawai’i at Manoa. From what I’ve been able to piece together, it seems that #GreenGlam started life as a “gamification” of a learning exercise for the students there. Luckily for the rest of us, it didn’t stop there, but garnered views, pictures, tweets, and engagement from a broader community. I can easily imagine using this concept to assign med students to locate Creative Common pathology images to share meeting specific guidelines, for example. Or images to support health literacy or public health outreach. Best infographic on [X] topics. What do you imagine? Here are some lovely selections from the students in Hawai’i to counterbalance the extreme cold we have here this week.

#SixWordPeerReview

While the complaints and humor about the idea of peer review remain fairly typical of similar hashtags in other years, I was impressed with how the conversations around #SixWordPeerReview eventually turned to discussions of how to improve the peer review process in general. Here are some of the humorous tweets as well as some of the more thoughtful ones.

#PrincessBrideScience

Alright, this is an indulgence. I’ve always enjoyed the film Princess Bride, but it never entered my mind to adapt it to a conversation around … science? And science education? And scientific methods? I’m still shaking my head with incredulity and delight at some of the clever puns and offerings from the #PrincessBrideScience stream.

NOTE: The tweet immediately above is in reference to this week’s new scandal:


First posted at THL Blog: http://thlibrary.wordpress.com/2014/01/27/science-games-on-twitter-hashtags-of-the-week-hotw-week-of-january-27-2014/

“How Many Hives?”: Social Media Can Prevent a Crisis with Storytelling, Engagement, & Training

Michigan RenFest 2010

This post is about food allergies and communication strategies. But let’s step back a bit and see how I got here.

Yesterday morning early (for me, but not for most docs), I attended the local Pediatrics Grand Rounds with presenter Joyce Lee. Joyce was talking on Twitter uses for clinicians and researchers. That will be another blogpost, once I have a chance to work through some of the content presented. For today, I wanted to highlight one particular bit that Joyce presented about kids with food allergies. I had somehow previously missed this, and it is too good to miss! I am particularly interested in this since both my son and I also have food allergies.

Joyce is a pediatrician (I’m oversimplifying), and a mom of kids with pretty severe food allergies. She’s also very engaged in new technologies and is interested in new learning modalities and social media. That gives a bit of context for how she and her son came up with these phenomenal and effective ways for him to both learn and communicate what he needs to have for health care crisis prevention and support from the people around him. Frankly, from what I’m seeing here, he is MUCH better at being aware of his needs and communicating them than I am. This is also a very cool idea that I wish I had thought of when my kid was in need of this. I have a lot to learn here, and this strategy would have prevented a whole boatload of problems & events for our family over several years. This is GENIUS, pure and simple.

Joyce’s son, “B,” has severe food allergies. Note that they use a letter “B” instead of his name? This is to protect his privacy on social media. This is a good best practice, and one the kids should learn and adopt as well as the parents and teachers. And family friends, and pastors, and acquaintances, and … EVERYONE! Please, DON’T use a kid’s real name online!

The problem with food allergies, which I’ve faced, is at school other kids and teachers don’t understand and can inadvertently poison the poor kid. I remember how I wept with anger and frustration when I discovered that the school therapist my son was seeing was rewarding him for good behavior with foods that triggered undesirable behavior, and then sending him back into the mainstream classroom. I bet his main teacher wasn’t too happy either, and Lord alone knows how much school he missed from the migraines triggered by the dangerous foods. For B, a mistake like that could kill him.

PART ONE

So now, Joyce’s son has a blog.

I Have Food Allergies
I Have Food Allergies:
http://ihavefoodallergies.tumblr.com/

On his blog, he has his Youtube videos. This is the storytelling part of the post. Part One describes how to tell if he’s having a reaction, and what to do. Part Two describes how to avoid poisoning him, since it isn’t always obvious (as I am STILL learning, with my own food sensitivities). Here is the first video. When she showed this in Grand Rounds, the entire room full of doctors and nurses and other hospital staff were ooohing and aaahing and laughing. It is a very charming and effective way to deliver this lifesaving content. That’s the training part.


Allergy Action Plan (Antihistamine versus Epipen) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Ymah1199xo

Joyce wrote a separate blogpost that explained the background, mechanics, theory, and how this was made.

Online Peer to Peer Education or shall we call it Peer to Teacher Education?
http://joycelee.tumblr.com/post/31910454867/online-peer-to-peer-education-or-shall-we-call-it

This is pretty cool stuff. Even more cool, the school decided to show the video to all of the kids in the school, 700 of them, and all the teachers. That’s the engagement part. Even more engagement, a blogpost by Wendy Sue Swanson (a.k.a. Seattle Mama Doc) brought more attention to this. Would this video help others understand food allergies? Does this training from this one young boy extrapolate to other kids and families?

Bring Paperwork To Life: Food Allergies:
http://seattlemamadoc.seattlechildrens.org/bring-paperwork-to-life-food-allergies/

PART TWO

Now, for comparison, let’s take a look at what a food allergy action plan normally looks like.

Food Allergy Action Plan
Food Allergy Research & Education (FARE) (www.FoodAllergy.Org): Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Emergency Care Plan: http://www.foodallergy.org/document.doc?id=234

I’ll tell you, this is vastly more attractive, clear, and engaging than what they had when my now-college-age son was in school. Still, despite the vast improvements, it is a little scary to read through, especially if you are the one responsible for saving the life of someone else’s kid. It gives you the information, but it doesn’t make you laugh, or hear the kid’s voice when they describe how it feels for them when things go wrong.

The second video is my favorite. Less dire, but it covers all the information I need so desperately to communicate to my colleagues, restaurants, and friends. How do you not poison me? Wash the table, wash your hands, be wary of tricky foods. I especially love the part about tricky foods.


Allergy Action Plan, Part 2 (Please don’t poison me) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EGG6_EuK3oM

I wish so much I could make every restaurant employee in the country watch this video. And have it translated into other languages. My family spends a lot of time embedded in Japanese cultural activities, which includes Japanese restaurants. My main problem is with gluten, and you’d think I’d be safe there since their cuisine is based heavily on rice. You’d have trouble believing some of the bizarre experiences I’ve had in Japanese restaurants because of the language barrier — servers who bring me the gluten-free soy sauce, and then bring my food already doused with regular soy sauce. Oh, miso? Yes, it has wheat in it. (After I’ve eaten it and my mouth is tingling and swelling.) So why did you bring it to me? [Imagine a cranky face. More than cranky.]

Here Joyce explains more of the outcomes from the first video and considers aspect that might explain why it has proved so effective.

Allergy Action Plan Part 2: http://joycelee.tumblr.com/post/36728442953/allergy-action-plan-part-2-its-been-a-while-since

PART THREE

Did they stop there? Of course not!

One of the challenges of food allergies is that despite massive fine-tuning of your lifestyle, education of others, and so forth, there is no point at which you are completely safe, no point at which you can stop being aware, when you can rest and relax and trust that you are safe. But all of us have times when we’re tired, worn out, just not on top of our game, and must trust others to watch out for us when we aren’t quite doing such a great job ourselves. Something always happens. It is just when you get to the point of feeling safe, let down your guard, and that’s when it happens.

The videos are awesome and amazing, but what about when you aren’t online, when the class is outside or on a field trip? Joyce and B have made nametags, bookbag lists, and collaborated on making a booklet with his information. Kind of a quick reference as a backup for the content in the videos. Even better, they’ve made the original files available free online for other families and parents to use.

DESIGNING FOR HEALTH: A PEDIATRIC PROTOTYPE FOCUSED ON ALLERGIES http://joycelee.tumblr.com/post/50507408498/designing-for-health-a-pediatric-prototype-focused-on

Check out the blogpost for the other file links, but here is the PDF of the insides of the booklet.

Allergy Booklet: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/1112237/nametag/allergy%20booklet_51213.pdf

MORE

Joyce is not the only parent using social media to get out their story about food allergies, trying to get people to understand what it’s like. The more people understand, the safer life will be for those of us with food allergies and sensitivities. Here is another post from Seattle Mama Doc to round out the information in the post, and provide more context. These aren’t part of Joyce’s official story, but I bet she’s familiar with this stories. I know I am.

Four Hours on a School Bus: http://seattlemamadoc.seattlechildrens.org/four-hours-on-a-school-bus/

Here is a little more information. The basics, all in one small tidy package, and a couple useful links to learn more.

Don’t Be Shy About Food Allergies http://seattlemamadoc.seattlechildrens.org/dont-be-shy-about-food-allergies/

Food Allergy Research and Education (FARE): http://www.foodallergy.org/

Kids with Food Allergies: http://community.kidswithfoodallergies.org/pages/community

Maker Movement Meets Healthcare

When I try to talk to peers and colleagues about the Maker Movement, one of the questions that keeps coming up over and over is what the heck this has to do with healthcare, and why am I bothering to spend my valuable time with it. So, this post has three examples illustrating the intersection of the Maker Movement with healthcare. Basically, for one of these it’s health literacy education & outreach via hands on geek project, and for the other two, there were real world problems that have expensive, time-consuming or often inaccessible solutions, for which people came up with their own solutions and alternatives. And the solutions are cool, they work, and are usually MUCH cheaper than the official solution you try to get insurance to pay for. Since not everyone has insurance, and not everyone can afford the very best possible care, I see this as a good thing. Make sure you read all the way to the end. This just gets cooler and cooler. There are more, too, this is a very small sampling, just items I stumbled over in the past couple days without even looking for them.

(1)

Have you met Sylvia? Sylvia is twelve years old, is a Maker (I’m guessing her folks probably are also), and has her own series in Make Magazine, with a really cool blog and videos. In this example, she shows people how to build a wearable technology pendant that will sense your heart beat and display the rhythm of your pulse with flashing lights in a necklace.

The Sylvia Show: Lilypad Heartbeat Pendant:
http://sylviashow.com/episodes/s3/e1/mini/pendant

The full post at Make Magazine (Super Awesome Sylvia Builds a Pulse Sensor Pendant)
http://makezine.com/2013/05/28/super-awesome-sylvia-builds-a-pulse-sensor-pendant/

Sylvia’s Super Awesome Mini Maker Show: Make a Heartbeat Pendant:

I confess, at first I thought this seemed kind of staged, but there are enough close ups of her hands actually doing things like soldering, that I decided she really does know how to do the work, even if there might be assistance or advice from others for some parts.

Here’s where you can buy your own PulseSensor (which Sylvia connects to an Arduino for control):
http://pulsesensor.com/

(2)

Here Denver Dias, an undergraduate student in Mumbai India, was working to try to create a walking aid for the blind. Yes, we have walking canes and seeing eye dogs, but this extremely early prototype uses tech to create 3d maps of the surrounding area while walking. The maps are communicated to the user by a combination of tones and vibrations. The tech includes LEDs, sonar, ultrasound, and more.

His blogpost:
Walking aid for the blind – undergrad project…
http://revryl.com/2013/08/10/walking-aid-blind/

Found via Dangerous Prototypes:
http://dangerousprototypes.com/2013/08/12/arduino-based-sensor-shoes-assist-visually-impaired/

(3)

Did you look at this and think it was some fancy looking glove a kid was wearing for a costume? Well, it isn’t. This is a design for kids who, for whatever reason, don’t have fingers. This open-source, freely shared pattern makes it possible for people to create their own prosthetic ‘hand’ with a 3d printer. You can resize it and tweak it. It’s called Robohand. Watch the video if you want to see some awfully happy kids. They are hoping it will also be useful for veterans.

Complete set of mechanical anatomically driven fingershttp://www.thingiverse.com/thing:44150

Updated Robohand design:
http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:92937

MakerBot and Robohand — 3D Printing Mechanical Hands

Via BoingBoing, NPR, and more.

3dPrinter: Donated Makerbot 3D printers accelerate distribution of Robohand mechanical hands
http://www.3dprinter.net/makerbot-3d-printers-accelerate-distribution-of-robohand

BoingBoing: Sponsor shout-out: Makerbot and the Robohand
http://boingboing.net/2013/06/20/sponsor-shout-out-makerbot-an.html

MakerBot: Mechanical Hands From A MakerBot: The Magic Of Robohandhttp://www.makerbot.com/blog/2013/05/07/robohand/

NPR: 3-D Printer Brings Dexterity To Children With No Fingers
http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2013/06/18/191279201/3-d-printer-brings-dexterity-to-children-with-no-fingers

Now, if anyone still thinks that the Maker Movement lacks relevance to healthcare, I’ll go find more, but first stop and think about Jack Andraka, whose recent discovery of innovative technology to diagnose many life-threatening cancers earlier and more cheaply, seem very much in keeping with the philosophy of the Maker Movement.


First posted at CoolToysU:
http://cooltoysu.wordpress.com/2013/08/13/cool-toys-pic-of-the-day-maker-movement-meets-healthcare/

In Slideshare This Week: Science 2.0 & Education Trends

I’ve been under the weather this week, which makes me a bit behind in my blogging. I do have a number of exciting posts forthcoming, but in the meantime, here are some recent slidedecks from people I know on topics that are distracting me from the aforementioned blogposts.

Science 2.0 (social media adoption and use in science processes and communication) is something I’ve been tracking for years. Monday this week Cornelius Puschmann posted a very interesting analysis of metrics, trends, and relationships among science blogging communities. I must say I’m delighted, especially since he was looking at this from the perspective of libraries and challenges in selecting, curating, and archiving this new form of academic scholarship.


Puschmann, Cornelius. A Tale of Two Platforms: Emerging communicative patterns in two scientific blog networks: http://www.slideshare.net/coffee001/emerging-communicative-patterns-in-two-scientific-blog-networks-oxford

Cornelius also posted a slidedeck from a presentation he did late last year on the related topic of Twitter as big data for research purposes. Very nice.


Puschmann, Cornelius. Twitter as a data source for (socio)linguistic research. http://www.slideshare.net/coffee001/twitter-as-a-data-source-for-sociolinguistic-research

Jean-Claude Bradley is one of my Science 2.0 idols. The day after my post arguing for a different approach to Science 2.0, JC posted a new slide deck illustrating in detail how he integrates social media tools, processes, and apps into virtually every nook and cranny of the science teaching and research processes. Wow.


The Value of Openness in Research and Teaching: http://www.slideshare.net/jcbradley/delaware2013

By the way, since we’re looking at JC’s slides anyway, and since I’m working on a post about open access, here is another slide deck from JC on that topic.


Open Notebook Science: Transparency in Research: http://www.slideshare.net/jcbradley/bradley-open-notebook-science-georgia-tech-oa-week

Already mentioned in the Cool Toys blog earlier this week, but repeated in the UM Trends and Tech Team conversations, is this report mentioning an important shift in teen communication patterns, away from texting and SMS toward apps such as WhatsApp and Kik.


(mobileyouth) Download – ‘I’m so over SMS’: 2013 is the year youth abandon SMS in favor of Twitter, WhatsApp and Kik: http://www.slideshare.net/mobileyouth/web-3-imsooversms2013istheyearyouthabandonsmsinfavoroftwitterwhats-appandkik

Last but not least, storytelling is another topic I usually have on my mind, both for science communication as well as through the lens of how it shapes almost everything else we do in the world. Alan Levine is a real powerhouse of collection strategies, tools, and approaches to integrating storytelling in education. He’s done it again! Here is his newest slidedeck on the topic, “What mean ye, storytelling?” Wow. And I really mean, Wow.


Levine, Alan (Cogdog). What mean ye storytelling- the #etmooc version: http://www.slideshare.net/cogdog/what-mean-ye-storytelling-16476711

Bubble, Blur, Flip, Spin, Hoard, Hug. Part Three: Bubble

Original version published at: Life of an emerging technologies librarian in the health sciences: http://monthly.si.umich.edu/2013/01/17/life-of-an-emerging-technologies-librarian-in-the-health-sciences/ or on this blog: Part One: Then; Part Two: Now


Prezi: The Bubble
The Bubble: http://prezi.com/usxsqmpip_ro/the-bubble/

Bubble

Trend: The dot-com bubble burst. The real estate bubble burst. Now they say the higher ed bubble is bursting. Somewhere in between real world economies and the “graying of America,” people have been figuring out that lifelong learning means they can learn on their own through community colleges, MOOCs and digitally curated collections, and that they can learn and teach with others in online social learning spaces. It’s harder to get a formal degree, but with questions about if degrees pay off and a shifting hiring emphasis on skills and competencies, new approaches like badges may take the place of degrees.

Impact: Resources for learning are shifting to new spaces. Students will come from those learning environments, which will present new learning and outreach opportunities for patients and public. How do we position ourselves and our institutions in these new learning and teaching spaces in order to market our expertise, to engage our public, and to provide outreach and community support?

Further Thoughts:

I’ve been deeply focused on observing the “bubble” movement and conversations, as well as concepts, resources, movements, and organizations that are spinning off from that central theme. I have almost two hundred bookmarks that I’ve tagged simply “bubble” as being relevant to these thoughts, a few of which are shared here. Last Spring I did a workshop called “Online Social Learning Spaces” that focused on the range and diversity of spaces that are evolving online as alternatives to formal higher education.

Online_Social_Learning_Spaces
Online Social Learning Spaces: http://www.mindmeister.com/161977476/online-social-learning-spaces

I am very fortunate to be working at an institution of higher learning that has been aware of these trends for a very long time, and which has planned and prepared for them. While rank and file faculty may not have this in the front of their minds, the administrators do, and many students are asking the same questions that are being asked nationally. Is it worth it to spend this much money on education? Can I make a living with this degree or working in higher ed? Are there other (perhaps better) ways to make a living, or to learn what I want to learn? Is the structure of higher education fair to both teachers and students? And many more.

Here, administration has been staging changes that will help us position ourselves in this new and emerging educational market. Gradually, we are shifting toward more openness and transparency in what we teach and how we teach it. Open Michigan is a big part of this, as is Deep Blue, our institutional repository. Engaging the students in the process of creating online content, through programs like DScribe is a great way of making the initiatives sustainable. Consolidating our institutional brand (the Block-M) across all units on campus gives us a more unified identity for our online spaces, and this gives us more clout and power and reputation when it comes to the point of trying to teach online-only courses internationally, with a fee for the actual credits or credentials. Joining programs with national presence and local prestige, such as Coursera helps to encourage more of our own faculty to start building the skills they need to teach effectively in the online environment, thus broadening the base of faculty able to work in these new spaces.

Just to give you an idea of how long Michigan has been thinking about this and preparing for it, here is a 2008 video of John L King, then Vice Provost, in which he describes why we needed to be preparing for this — where education has come from, and where it is going. (Don’t worry, the title says “librarianship” but it really is a much broader thinkpiece.)


Librarianship, Now and in the Future: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wwAAUFFD6js

So, we aren’t there yet, not everyone has bought into this vision, not all students are independent enough to manage themselves taking an online course, not all faculty are able to make the transition. But. If I was a new young faculty member, a recent graduate of a teaching programs, a student, I would most definitely be practicing the skills to survive in the online educational environment. You don’t need to do everything there, but chances are very high that sooner or later you will be doing something there, and that “something” will be more and more of what you do. It isn’t just higher education, either. All those parents homeschooling their young kids? You just bet they are exploring online options to fill in where their skills are a little weak. This is a growing space, and it is expanding to fill blended spaces that combine face to face instruction with online resources in coffeeshops and church basements. It isn’t all about the ivory towers, not any more, not if it ever was.

(To be continued …)

Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): Health Education (Week of December 10, 2012)

First posted at THL Blog: http://wp.me/p1v84h-Yz


With this being finals week, and friends who just passed their doctoral dissertation defense, I have education on the brain. Here is a sampling of tweets and hashtags used in Twitter to discuss matters related to higher education, especially in healthcare.

Systematic Review Teams, Processes, Experiences

Recently I was privileged to speak with the students of Tiffany Veinot’s course in the School of Information on evidence-based practice and processes. It was an amazing and diverse group of students, with librarians and healthcare professionals from most (if not all) of the healthcare programs on campus! The students had insightful questions, the conversation went on much longer than it should have given the time allotted, but was as richly rewarding for me as I hope it was for them. The approach this year focused more on case studies and storytelling — what is it really like? The slides can’t give you the whole sense of it, but at least it is a start.

Systematic Review Teams, Processes, Experiences

Presentation is also viewable as a Google Presentation.

Systematic Review Teams, Processes, Experiences https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1NaaYxG15LqxxlahSI2L1pLu7Q8W870B66pox79prtQY/edit

How to … Facebook, YouTube & Twitter for Family Planning

I was logging into our library’s shared Slideshare account this morning and noticed one of my colleagues had uploaded something new on social media. I do a lot of social media classes & workshops, so of course I just HAD to take a closer look! I was impressed, very impressed. I like her slides better than the ones I’ve been doing. Kate spent more time on hers, I think, than I usually have the luxury to do. They are clear, well organized, engaging, use excellent examples for the topic, cover all the most important concepts, and go into tools / resources / strategies / techniques that I rarely use myself since I am not the main manager for our library’s Facebook pages and groups. These are definitely worth a look, even if I am prejudiced.