Science, Scientists and Twitter


Originally posted at the THL blog: http://wp.me/p1v84h-10w


My Twitter account as data visualization
Michael Sean Gallagher: My Twitter Account as Data Visualization

Most of you have probably already heard about Aaron Swartz’s death last week, and the response from the science community focusing on supporting and promoting Aaron’s vision for open access through the hashtag #PDFtribute occurring most prominently through Twitter. You can see an overview on the ETechLib blog.

#PDFTribute — The First (And Hopefully Last) Open Access “Martyr”: https://etechlib.wordpress.com/2013/01/14/pdftribute-the-first-and-hopefully-last-open-access-martyr/

Through the passion and urgency being brought to the conversations around these events, there are many conversations emerging around related issues, from how to make a PDF, tools for sharing files with the public, tools for discovering or negotiating intellectual property rights with publishers, and even how to use Twitter appropriately for science communication and productivity. One of the posts gathering attention today through the #PDFtribute stream is “10 ways scientists can benefit from Twitter” on one of the AAAS blogs.

Summer Allen. 10 ways scientists can benefit from Twitter. Qualia. January 15, 2013. http://membercentral.aaas.org/blogs/qualia/10-ways-scientists-can-benefit-twitter

Summer highlights ways in which Twitter is useful as a productivity tool for scientists: from troubleshooting to career strategies; tracking conversations around events whether you attend in person or not; data collection; research subject recruitment; tracking emerging topics and discoveries in your research topic as well as in science and technology in general; and sharing your findings and publications to both professional and public audiences. You can see more in the original blogpost, along with tips for best practices.

One response to “Science, Scientists and Twitter

  1. Pingback: Aaron, Lost, and Found Again | Emerging Technologies Librarian

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