Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): Spring has Sprung (Week of April 28, 2013)


This is what happens when I go out for a month with bronchitis. Thank GOODNESS that Chris Bulin (@Arduanne) is here to help provide some great content. So, this was first blogged at the THL Blog, http://thlibrary.wordpress.com/2013/05/03/hashtags-of-the-week-hotw-week-of-april-28-2013/


Some of you may be able to venture outside the walls of your study cubes and offices now. You may feel somewhat like a mole coming out of hiding; I know that’s how I felt this week. The sun was shining, the flowers were blooming, people were wearing sandals and shorts. What a change from the rest of the month of April and a harbinger of May weather (we hope). Still stuck in your windowless cell? Try the library cam for a little slice of the outside to hold you over until closing time:

Don’t forget there is still sunshine to be had even after closing time now too!

With all of the blooming, budding and sunshiny things, I couldn’t help but think about what might be going on in the world of #gardening. It’s a good way to burn some calories as well as adding fresh fruits and vegetables to your table.

Considering vegetable gardens put me in mind of a story I heard on the radio this morning about the under-reporting of deaths from malnutrition in Somalia, so I went looking for more information about #FoodInsecurity and #malnutrition.

In the tradition of all things hyperlinked, this lead me to investigate a multitude of hashtags including #slowfood, #nutrition, #SustainableAgriculture, #nutrigenomics, #GMO, and #GMCrops.

I rounded off my tour of twitter with a couple of recent news stories. The first was a flurry of activity on #AgGag about the first person charged with violating Agricultural Gag laws and the subsequent dismissal of the case. These laws are starting to come up for vote in several states including Pennsylvania and Tennessee.

Here’s a quote from the tweeted article:

Ag-Gag is the term given to legislation that targets undercover investigations of animal operations. There is disagreement over the purpose and impact of these laws. Facilities that raise animals for food and others in the food industry believe the laws protect food producers from the backlash that can arise when the public sees how their food is produced, even when done in a lawful manner. Others see this legislation as an impediment to the public’s ability to obtain information regarding their food supply and an effort by industry to hide animal welfare abuses.

The final story was about the increase in food and skin allergies in children. The scary part is where they can’t identify the cause of the increase, but the article does have some theories that are being tested. If you would like more places to start talking about nutrition, agriculture, and other food related topics, check out these other hashtags: #agchat, #glutenfree/#gf, #urbanag

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