Sharing Research on Twitter — Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of January 13, 2014)


Altmetrics: Top Articles of 2013

Last week in the #medlibs chat on altmetrics, Donna Kafel shared an interesting article on how research articles are shared in social media.

Haustein S, Peters I, Sugimoto CR, Thelwall M, Larivière V. Tweeting biomedicine: An analysis of tweets and citations in the biomedical literature. Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology, Article first published online: 26 NOV 2013. DOI: 10.1002/asi.23101
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/asi.23101/abstract
Preprint: http://arxiv.org/pdf/1308.1838.pdf

This is the newest study of how real life sciences research is being used in social media. They analyzed a sample of over a million articles from Pubmed to reveal patterns associated with heavily shared articles, then compiling a list of the most tweeted articles. (There will be a sequel to this post about them.)

Meanwhile, the Altmetrics web site has also released a year-end overview of the most influential research articles of 2013 according to the Altmetrics score. What is an Altmetrics score? In their words, “We’ve created and maintain a cluster of servers that watch social media sites, newspapers, government policy documents and other sources for mentions of scholarly articles. We bring all the attention together to compile article level metrics.”

Altmetrics: Top 100 Papers that Received the Most Attention Online: http://www.altmetric.com/top100

Let’s take a little closer look. For a richer understanding of how Altmetrics looks at articles, here is a screenshot of the Altmetrics report for the top ranked medical article from 2013.

Atmetrics: Sample Article Report
Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease with a Mediterranean Diet: http://www.altmetric.com/details.php?doi=10.1056/nejmoa1200303

As you can easily see, although Altmetrics looks at many sources of information (Twitter, Facebook, F1000, news media, videos, blogs, Google+, Reddit,Mendeley, CiteULike), Twitter activity far outstrips activity for the other sources.

Now, usually the HOTW posts track a hashtag with health, life science, education, or research interest. This week, as a diversion from the usual, I wanted to see what articles are being shared and how best to discover them. I found that neither “research” nor “#research” were terrible effective, although both were interesting, they didn’t retrieve actual research articles but rather articles about research funding and process. What did work was searching the word “Pubmed.” Here are some of the most popular research articles (including mentions of UM researchers!) from the past week.

What an amazing collection, and great way to discover articles of interest that I might have missed otherwise!


First posted at THL Blog: http://wp.me/p1v84h-1Bv

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s