Informed Consent in a New Era


Informed Consent copy

I’m a big fan of John Wilbanks’ work in the area of open personal health data and informed consent, and have blogged about that here before. Briefly, my awareness of John’s work began with “We Consent” which has now transformed into Sage’s “Participant Centered Consent Toolkit.”

Cool Toys Pic of the day - We Consent
Sage: Participant-Centered Consent Toolkit (E-Consent)

Recently someone asked me a question about “online informed consent.” I think they were remembering my having mentioned John Wilkin’s stuff, a.k.a “portable legal consent” or “portable informed consent.” These and “online informed consent” are … related concepts, but perhaps not as closely related as some might think. Just to complicate matters, people are also using jargon like “dynamic consent” and “broad consent” to mean things related to both of these, but which are not quite the same. There are also people trying to get the phrase “informed consent” converted to “educated consent” as possibly being more meaningful. In this post, I will try to sort some of this out, but I’m no kind of expert in consent, and this is complicated, really REALLY complicated.

First, the short-short explanation. Portable informed consent (PIC) usually is part of online informed consent, but online informed consent (OIC) is rarely portable. Riiiight. OK, a step backwards.

PORTABLE CONSENT

The idea of portable informed consent is (in my mind, at least) analogous to Creative Commons licensing for your own creative works, except that it applies to your own health data. Actually, the idea of this really came from people wanting to share genomic data. You walk through an online informed consent process, agree to which version of a license you are comfortable with, and then when you share your data in a secure repository, that license or consent agreement is attached. People who want to use your data, must agree to follow those predetermined restrictions. Researchers who don’t agree, aren’t allowed to see your data, only data from other folk who agree to whatever guidelines they need for their project. Researchers who don’t follow the rules will be denied access to all of the data.

Personal Genomics

Genomics is basically mapping the genome. Personal genomics is doing this for a person in particular, rather than a species or condition or other collective group. Some people get involved in exploring personal genomics because of simple curiosity, but many are driven by long standing medical challenges without any easily identifiable solution. Some people are terrified at the idea of what they might find out. Others are concerned that the data will result in problems with jobs or insurance. Those urgently seeking help for health problems often want to share and find others who might have insights into their problem. OpenSNP and the Personal Genome Project are two examples of places where people share their genomic data. By making their data public and consenting to its use by researchers, they are hoping to support solutions not only for themselves but for others like them. Making sure that consent is LEGAL is essential for supporting future research. One great example of this is Jay Lake, who contributed his whole DNA sequencing data and that of his tumor, making possible research on new treatments that came too late for him. It’s a powerful story.

ONLINE INFORMED CONSENT

Online informed consent is a great deal simpler, in that it mostly takes the usual informed consent process (reading forms, signing forms, filing forms) and puts it all into an online web-based interface in a secure system. But, PIC gets more buzz in the popular press and media, while OIC gets more attention from within the hallways of day-to-day research communities. PIC grew out of work with personal genomics and is designed to make data sharing simpler, research more open, and problem solving more dynamic, all while still being responsive to issues of privacy and ethics. OIC is a tool designed to make the IRB management simpler for researchers.

DYNAMIC CONSENT

Dynamic consent is closer to portable consent, but grew more out of tissue and biobanking contexts, rather than data or genomics. Dynamic consent has a lot of nitpicky little options, and allows you to change your mind over time. That’s why it’s dynamic — things keep changing. Right now, dynamic consent is used primarily for what happens to parts of your body that are removed from your body while you are alive, and used for various medical purposes. Sometimes those purposes involved throwing what wasn’t used in the nearest incinerator, but sometimes there is something interesting and the doctors or researchers want to keep a sample for future use.

Biobanking

Now, remember, I’m drastically oversimplifying here. There are many more situations and options that come into play. Healthcare researchers have come to realize that we often don’t know where the next interesting possibility will come from, which is part of why biobanking is becoming more important. A biobank is sort of a library of tissues (meaning parts of human or animals or plants). Biobanks are often focused on a certain type of tissue or condition. Many biobanks collect tissues for a particular kind of cancer, or conditions like Parkinson’s, Alzheimer, autism, etc. Others may focus on a particular organ, like brains, breast tissue, lungs, or genome. In book and journal libraries, the librarians have traditionally spent a lot of time trying to select just the most important material on their special topics, but over generations, we’ve found the most desired content is as often as not the parts that were considered cheap and unimportant at the time, which are now expensive and hard to find, because no one kept them. Some of the same issues are coming up with biobanking, but complicated by the challenge of each and every sample being unique (although there might be copies of cell lines). At least with books, if one library lost theirs, another library might have a copy. Part of the idea of all these different kinds of consent is to try to maximise the number and diversity of samples that can be preserved and made accessible to future researchers.

PRESUMED CONSENT

Presumed consent also related to tissues, actually organ donation, but after you are no longer alive or aware enough to give or change your consent. Where I live, you have to register as an organ donor. If you don’t, and are in a fatal accident, no one is allowed to use your organs as transplants to save the lives of other folk who need new organs to survive. That isn’t how it works in all countries, though. In some countries they have “presumed consent,” where the assumption is that organ donation is fine with you as long as you don’t say NO beforehand. So, opt-in vs. opt-out. That’s the main difference. Sounds simple, doesn’t it? But people have incredibly strong feelings about both of these options.

BROAD CONSENT

Broad consent is probably the messiest of all of these. Just look at these article titles!

Can Broad Consent be Informed Consent?

Broad consent is informed consent

Broad consent versus dynamic consent in biobank research: Is passive participation an ethical problem?

Broad Consent Versus Dynamic Consent: Pros And Cons For Biobankers To Consider

Broad Consent in Biobanking: Reflections on Seemingly Insurmountable Dilemmas

Should donors be allowed to give broad consent to future biobank research?

You can just feel the tensions rising as you read through the list. It is obvious that this is not an area of consensus. And what can it possibly mean to consent mean when there isn’t an agreement about what consent is?

“Broad consents are not open nor are blanket consents. To give a broad consent means consenting to a framework for future research of certain types.” Steinsbekk KS, Myskja BK, Solberg B. Broad consent versus dynamic consent in biobank research: Is passive participation an ethical problem? European Journal of Human Genetics (2013) 21:897–902.

Broad consent attempts to make a best guess of what might be needed by the researcher of the future, and to try to get the individual to agree to a flexible use and reuse of tissues, samples, or data. As you can tell from the titles above, “broad consent” tends to refer to tissues rather than data, but when you get down to brass tacks, all of these could theoretically apply to a wide variety of donated content.

CLOSING THOUGHTS

The idea behind all of these myriad forms of consent is knotted into the dynamic between the rights of the individual and the needs of the community. Without research, we stagnate and die, literally, since solutions cannot be discovered for the aches and pains and problems that lead to increased mortality and reduced longevity. As a community, as a species, we don’t make progress without sharing. At the same time, the goal is to reduce harm to individuals, and forcing people to ‘consent’ against their will causes harm. I’ve known people who practically had a nervous breakdown at the idea of becoming an organ donor, the idea of part of them living on in someone else distressed them that deeply. I know others who fear what could happen to them if their genetic data fell into the “wrong hands.” I’m not one of them. I’m a registered organ donor, and I donated my genomic data to OpenSNP. But I still respect the emotional pain that would be caused by forcing consent. It’s an ethical dilemma which our society is obviously still working to solve. While looking at background material for this post I stumbled across two phrases that seemed to express some of the challenges well: “From Informed Consent to No Consent?” “Open Consent for Closed Minds.”

“I’m proposing … that we reach into our bodies and we grab the genotype, and we reach into the medical system and we grab our records, and we use it to build something together.” “I hate [the] word ‘patient.’ I don’t like being patient when … health care is broken.” John Wilbanks

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