Insights into the Lived Healthcare Experiences of the Transgendered (#TransHealthFail)


#TransHealthFail

#TransHealthFail

Several years ago, I was in an elevator with a then-local clinician (no longer here) who was complaining to me about how unhappy he was with his clinical practice. He had bought into the practice from another clinician who was retiring, and it wasn’t until he moved here and began actually working there that he discovered half of his patients were transgendered. I still remember how his face twisted up into a knot and his beard waggled as he snarled with disgust about being forced to treat “THOSE people.” He told me, “You don’t know. THEY are EVERYWHERE around here! How could I expect that?” I got out of the elevator as soon as I could. And then I started trying to plan a trans education event for our library. It took some years to be able to make it happen.

I was so excited when I heard about the Trans Health Fail hashtag during the Stanford Medicine X conference. I’ve been wanting to blog about it for a couple months, and finally it is happening. The post is divided into four sections: reports of experiences (mostly with insurance, staff, and clinicians); longer personal testimonials; healthcare reactions; and popular media. There is even a section where trans people have given kudos to the absence of failure, when folk have gotten it right. Most important take-away lessons to learn? Names are important (not just for people who are transgendered, but perhaps especially for them). Privacy is important. Respect is important. Information is important. Access to care is life-saving. Another big part of the conversation centers around the high mortality of transgendered persons, both from violence, and stigma. The basic assumption of what SHOULD be happening in healthcare gets back to “First do no harm.” A lot of the perceived harms which are described could be changed fairly easily just by better education of healthcare professionals of all sorts, and the office and support staff in healthcare facilities. Some of them make complete sense to professionals working inside the healthcare system, but obviously did not to the person on the other side. If you haven’t yet noticed this conversation, it’s worth taking a few minutes to explore. It could save lives. And if you are a healthcare provider who actually can and will treat transgender persons, please be aware of the Provider Self-Input Form for the Trans & Queer Referral Aggregator Database from RAD Remedy

LIVED EXPERIENCES

LIVED EXPERIENCES: Access to Care

!! https://twitter.com/TGGuide/status/629892052914991104

LIVED EXPERIENCES: Insurance

LIVED EXPERIENCES: Healthcare Environments & Systems

LIVED EXPERIENCES: Supporting Roles

LIVED EXPERIENCES: Clinicians

!! https://twitter.com/anaphylaxus/status/639815813495701504

LIVED EXPERIENCES: Children

LIVED EXPERIENCES: Done Right

TESTIMONIES

HEALTHCARE RESPONSE

MEDIA ATTENTION

Atlantic

BitchMedia ??

Buzzfeed

Cosmopolitan

DailyBeast

DailyDot

Distractify

FacesOfHealthCare

Feministing

Fusion

HuffPostGay

HuffPost

Indiana

MarySue

Mashable

Metronews Canada

Mother Jones

NewNowNext

Patient Opinion

Vice

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