Category Archives: Accessibility & Usability

#ADA25! Tech + Touch + Targets: Part Two, “Our New Technology”

#ADA25 Amtrak New Accessible Technology #a11y

To continue the series on “what I did for #ADA25,” I’d like to talk about the very exciting event here in town last week, in which Ann Arbor sets the stage for a national high speed rail system, and access for persons with disability is at the core of making this possible.

#ADA25 Amtrak New Accessible Technology #a11y

AMTRAK

The event was the ribbon cutting for the new disability-accessible platform at the Ann Arbor Amtrak station.

“New disability-accessible platform opens at Ann Arbor Amtrak station” http://www.mlive.com/news/ann-arbor/index.ssf/2015/07/new_disability_platform_opens.html

The event started out with the mayor, Chris Taylor, describing the importance of the University of Michigan Health System and hospitals in providing advanced health care to the residents of the State of Michigan, and how critical accessible rail transport is for supporting this.

Lt. Governor Brian Calley noted, “Acceptance & awareness are important, but inclusion is a game changer.”

Richard Bernstein, Judge of the Michigan Supreme Court, waxed eloquent, clearly joyful and delighted with this innovation. You can hear his full remarks on Soundcloud.

Joe McHugh (Amtrak’s Senior Vice President) described this as “the flagship of our new technology,” continuing with the vision and possibilities that would come from this.

Joe really meant technology, too! The new boarding platform is retractable, and extends toward the train when in use. The Amtrak press release describes it as “The platform mechanically extends toward the train, bridging the gap created when a level-boarding platform is needed. This next generation of passenger-focused technology will allow America’s Railroad® to deliver a modern passenger railroad that is accessible to all.” That wasn’t the limit of the tech, either. In addition to designing the platform, the interactive portions of the tech, they also had to design manual tech to support the process in case of problems with the automated portions or for situations that require special extra support.

#ADA25 Amtrak New Accessible Technology #a11y

As with all ribbon-cutting events, the actual story started long long before. Or stories, I should say. This event sprang from the intersection of many stories, many people’s experiences. There are the local folk who fought for a better way to take the train, and helped make people aware of the reasons why it should start HERE. There were wheelchair passengers who complained about being put on a jack, hoisted into mid-air, and left dangling in the rain while the station staff try to get the logistics sorted out. There were the Amtrak staff who helped people with luggage, moms with strollers, elderly folk climbing the narrow stairs into or out of the Amtrak cars.

The story that resonated most powerfully with me was told by Richard Devylder, the U.S. DOT’s Senior Advisor for Accessible Transportation.

#ADA25 Amtrak New Accessible Technology #a11y

Richard was born without arms or legs. The combination of his experience, his intelligence, his connections with the community of persons with disabilities all help to inform his position and influence change. And when the opportunity presents itself, he absolutely will go for the brass ring.

That’s kind of what happened one day a few years ago. Richard described a room full of transportation higher ups. He asked, “Well, do you want to see high speed rail in the United States?” Yes, yes, yes, they all did. The next thing Richard said? “Then you have to find a way to let people like me board the train in less than 15 minutes.” BOOM.

That was one story. He had another good one. Richard described one day when he was trying to get on the train, and a ramp had been set up to allow him to board. But he couldn’t even get on the ramp because it was so crowded with people. Elderly with walkers. Parents with strollers. People with heavy rolling bags of luggage. Part of him thought, “Hey, why are all these people blocking my ramp?” Immediately he realized it is because all of them also needed a ramp, and the one provided for him was the only one there. BOOM #2!

We need ramps for boarding trains absolutely as much as we need curb cuts. The next ADA25 story I’ll be telling is about a group of people in virtual worlds. They were pretty impressed when I told them about this new Amtrak platform. Then they asked, “But why did it take 25 years? And why is there only ONE in the entire United States?” More on that in the next post.

The actual ribbon cutting, with Gary Talbot as the honored local person who pushed the hardest to make this happen.

And then people could board!

#ADA25 Amtrak New Accessible Technology #a11y
#ADA25 Amtrak New Accessible Technology #a11y


Updated to include Gary Talbot’s name.

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#ADA25! Tech + Touch + Targets: Part One, “I couldn’t type a hug.”

Screenshots from the White House video of President Obama Celebrating ADA25

Yesterday was the 25th anniversary of the signing of the American with Disabilities Act. I want to describe three technology events that happened around the theme of celebrating this milestone! These three stories include high speed rail, robots, assistive communication devices, virtual worlds, web accessibility, exoskeletons, 3d printing, and more. That’s the tech. But the touch is just as important, if not more so, and the question of what’s left that needs doing is the idea of defining and meeting our targets. Let’s get started.

WHITE HOUSE

First, President Obama celebrated, of course, with many people. One was Haben Girma, the first deaf-blind graduate of the Harvard Law School. The President would type words to talk with her, and she would listen with her hands on a machine that translated the typing into Braille. “I couldn’t type a hug,” he said.

Screenshots from the White House video of President Obama Celebrating ADA25Screenshots from the White House video of President Obama Celebrating ADA25

Alice Wong, of the Disability Visibility Project, attended the event through her telepresence robot, and wrote about it later, here.

Screenshots from the White House video of President Obama Celebrating ADA25

The White House has made available both the highlights video (under 3 minutes) and the complete event (about 1.5 hours).


President Obama Celebrates the 25th Anniversary of the ADA https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SZCQT-DYVNY


President Obama Speaks at the 25th Anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pUI-TUFlteU

Towards the end of his remarks, President Obama described the how his father-in-law’s experience with multiple sclerosis helped to shape his passion for reducing barriers for persons with disabilities, and his awareness of how access to necessary resources can help people grow into their potential, and how that helps all of us.

“And just an aside on this, for a long time, he would not get a motorized wheelchair because he had gotten this disability at a time when they weren’t available and it was expensive, and they weren’t wealthy, and insurance didn’t always cover it. And it just gave you a sense of — Michelle and I would talk sometimes about how much more he could have done, how much more he could have seen — as wonderful as a dad as he was, and as wonderful as a coworker as he was, he was very cautious about what he could and couldn’t do — not because he couldn’t do it, but because he didn’t want to inconvenience his family and he didn’t want to be seen as somehow holding things up.” Remarks by the President on The Americans With Disabilities Act https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2015/07/20/remarks-president-americans-disabilities-act

25th Anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act: A Personal Timeline [#ADA25]

ADA 25th Anniversary

The 25th anniversary of the signing into law of the Americans with Disabilities Act is this week. Disability, accessibility, and usability are frequent topics in this blog. I can’t let this pass without a post (despite being rather delinquent with posting since our move into our new library, but more on that another time). But what do I have to offer? There are countless people around the country writing about what has changed since the ADA came into effect, and how much remains to do. There are organizations devoted to #ADA25 with toolkits for organizing your own events. There are celebrations at the White House and most of the state capitals, and beyond. (Resources and links towards the end of this post.) So what can I do? Perhaps just share my own stories of disability experiences in my own life.

MY PERSONAL DISABILITY EXPERIENCE TIMELINE

These are mostly stories from long before the ADA was signed into law. Back then, having a disability was shameful and stigmatized, denied and hidden if at all possible. Accommodations wasn’t even a concept that most people could hold in their mind. The language used to discuss disabilities was stigmatizing and hurtful, at best. You had to have a thick skin. Then, as far as we knew, my family was all able-bodied. We know better now. Several of us in my family have something not quite right with our bodies or minds. I suspect this is true for many families. The families I’ve met with extreme good health are often from cultures where disabilities is still heavily stigmatized, so I’m never quite sure if they are truly as healthy as they say, or if they are also in denial.

Eating sorrel at recess

I was in grade school, probably 2nd grade. There was a red-headed boy with freckles who was new to our class and a lot bigger than everyone else. He had been held back because he couldn’t pass the grade, so he was taking 2nd grade over again. His parents had transferred him to the Catholic school hoping that he’d get more support at a private school than in the public school system. These days we wouldn’t hold the kid back, but would have them tested for a learning disability, get a diagnosis, figure out the accommodations, and design an IEP. No one would play with him. He was new, big, a little scary, and people thought there was something wrong with him. No one was sure what, but they didn’t want to get too close. It was the contagion theory of disability. “Oops! He has cooties! It’s catching!”

I was a victim of the same contagion theory. My brother also had some undiagnosed disability (later discovered to be on the autism spectrum). The other kids wanted to steer clear of him, and by association, me as well. Not every one, and not all the time. Sometimes people would play with me. Not like the red-headed boy. No one EVER played with him. So I took him under my wing. At recess we’d go over to a big tree, sit in the dirt, and talk. I was really smart, and he wasn’t, at least in the same way, but he thought hard about things and had good questions. I’d answer his questions, and I enjoyed playing teacher. One of the things I showed him was the sorrel growing wild in the grass under the tree, that tasted tart and salty at the same time. At the end of the year, he didn’t pass again, and was held back again, or transferred again. I don’t know. I never saw him after that year. 

One leg shorter

A few years later, my family transferred all of us to a public school because we couldn’t afford the fees. In my new class there was a boy who had one leg that was shorter than the other. He’d had polio when he was little, and almost died, I was told. But he didn’t die, it just messed up his leg. Even so, he was taller than me. Quiet. I mean, REALLY quiet. I don’t remember him ever talking without being ordered to. He wore glasses, had dark hair that he wore almost down to his shoulders (which just wasn’t done then), with long bangs that fell over his face. In those days, we wouldn’t have called him disabled, it was just there were things he couldn’t do. He was that little bit ‘different,’ and boy, did he know it! I wanted to talk to him and get to know him (I thought he was kind of cute), but he didn’t talk to anyone.

Smart as a whip, too bad about the wheelchair

There were two Anderson families in my town that had large families. Mine was one, and there was another one. In middle school, I got to meet one of the kids from the other Anderson family. Ken Anderson was in a wheelchair, I didn’t know why. His disability was big and obvious and he couldn’t hide it. He was smart, social, and people liked him. There was never a shortage of folk who would help push his chair. Ken went on to found a student organization for people with “handicaps” (that was the lingo then) at the University of Iowa. It was called Restrict Us Not (RUN). He had a successful accounting career, and founded his own business. Ken died last winter.

Put the pedal to the metal

In high school, Jeff Benson was a year ahead of me. Jeff had also had polio (I’m old enough to remember getting the vaccine on sugar cubes). For him, it wasn’t just one leg, and not just a little. Both legs were effected. He could have used a wheelchair, but I remember him walking with arm braces. Bright, shiny light hair, gritty and determined, and always the life of the party. He was a live wire! He was a drummer for a popular band, and really belted it out. I remember when he got his first set of wheels. At that age, I didn’t know it was possible for people with wheelchairs to drive. I’m not sure anyone in town had seen a car like this before! His parents had the red hotrod modified to use hand brakes, and I remember him waving to his audience, as he’d roar out of the parking lot with the top down. We lost Jeff just a couple months ago.

Hiding in plain sight

In college, one year, I took Italian. It was a small class. The university didn’t allow classes to be taught unless they had a minimum of six students. We managed to barely scrape by with just the required number to allow us to take the class for the full year. There was one young man who was a senior for the second time. He was in engineering, and they wouldn’t allow him to graduate until he had a full year of a foreign language. He had already flunked out of every other foreign language taught at the school, and this was his last chance to graduate. He struggled, but we all helped him along. Towards the end of the year, the rest of us went off to the side and had a conversation. We had all figured out that he had dyslexia. Did he know? Did he know there are resources to help? Should we talk to him about it? Life could be easier, you know! So we did. We brought it up the last day of class. We mentioned that we knew he had to be absolutely brilliant to have gotten along this far with good grades and no one knowing. He completely panicked. He’d been trying to hide it for his entire school career, and was terrified that we would tell someone and he’d never be able to get a job.

Keeping her safe from romance

After college, I worked at the university library. Someone brought in one of the faculty who was blind to talk about how she used information resources. She was brilliant, obviously, sturdy, and with a huge sense of humor, but life wasn’t built for people with visual impairments, and she had no vision at all. How had she gotten through school and become a faculty member? What struck us the most about her story was when she complained that they had no audiobooks of Harlequin romances. She explained that people with disabilities were considered too fragile to have any interest in sex or romance, and so the organizations that would pay to make audio copies of her academic research information needs would not pay for “smut.” A couple of the gals took matters into their own hands and corralled a group of volunteers. We all took a chapter, and recorded a “smutty” romance novel for her.

Closing Thoughts

I could go on. There are many more stories. As the time of the ADA came closer, I have more and more stories of people wanting to learn more and understand about the barriers. After the ADA was signed, I have stories of some incredibly bone-headed things people did in the name of “accommodation.” When I moved here to Ann Arbor, I was initially shocked by the lack of accessibility for the library I was to manage, and how difficult it was to find people on campus aware of web accessibility. We got an elevator for my library, and then we got a campus web accessibility working group. 

First Meeting of the University of Michigan Web Accessibility Interest Group
1pm on Tuesday August 7, 2007, in a meeting room in the School of Public Health.

There is still a lot to do, but we keep trying. Meanwhile, over the years, many if my friends and family have been diagnosed with temporary, chronic, or permanent health issues ofone  sort or another. Disability advocacy started out for me as something I wanted to do for others, because I love to help people. Now it is personal. As I age, it becomes more and more personal. Without the ADA, I probably wouldn’t even have a job. I wouldn’t have been able to get past a few major health hurdles in the past few decades. Because of the protection of the law, I was able to get accommodations and keep working. I hope that what I do will continue to be useful for years to come. 


RESOURCES AND LINKS

ADA Anniversary Toolkit: http://adaanniversary.org/
Proclamation (Organizations & Government Entities)
Pledge for Individuals
Faith Communities
Resources
ADA Information: http://www.adainformation.org/
Quizbook
ADA Legacy Project: http://www.adalegacy.com/ada25
ADA National Network (Great Plains ADA Center): https://adata.org/ada-anniversary
Timeline of the American with Disabilities Act
National ADA Systematic Review
ADA 25 Celebrate: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbUCwPT82s4WnKwnc-vEQyw
Disability.gov ADA25 Social Media Toolkit: https://www.disability.gov/newsroom/ada-25-social-media-toolkit/
Smithsonian: EveryBody: An Artifact History of Disability in America: https://everybody.si.edu/
Access to resources often comes through technology
Communication, Transportation, Medicine, War

Hashtags:
#ADA
#ADA25
#DgovADA25

THEN


Senator Harkin Delivers Floor Speech in American Sign Language Upon Passage of the ADA: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BomPo6fPOOo

ADA History Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLhUAlIEq4gbqCK_3_ls2K2Rtiq6hPumHa

NOW

The ADA at 25: Promise, Progress, Opportunity U.S. Senate Bill Sponsor Hon. Tom Harkin https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yToAav3qqBU

National Center on Health, Physical Activity and Disability (NCHPAD): Real People, Real Stories: Celebrating 25 Years of the ADA https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLwMObYmlSHaNT-gke7PoQqkc_k22dYqN5


What has changed since the ADA was passed 25 years ago? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mW4hB2hcPBM

http://hr.umich.edu/webaccess/
http://chronicle.com/blogs/profhacker/how-to-evaluate-your-web-pages-for-accessibility/60485?cid=wc&utm_source=wc&utm_medium=en

Introduction to Usability & Accessibility for Medical Librarians

Last week’s Twitter chat for medical librarians (#medlibs) was on topics near and dear to my heart: accessibility and usability. I (a) was impressed by the caliber of the conversation, and (b) wanted to collect the good links and ideas in a place that would make it easy to find for other medical librarians. So, here is a Storify. I particularly recommend the links.

Where the Weird Things Are

So, when I got back from my trip to MLA, I went to work, and this weird thing happened.

See what I mean? And it did feel weird. I was talking to someone today about why it felt weird, and it’s basically because I’m not doing anything that special, nothing that I don’t know perfectly well people all around me are also doing. So why not give them ALL awards, eh? The parable (or parallel) I have is weddings, graduations, and such. They aren’t for YOU. The marriage is for you, but the wedding is for your friends and family. The degree and what you do with it is for you, but the graduation ceremony is for your friends and family. Right? The award is less about anything I’ve done, at least in my mind, and more about saying in a public way that all of you who are doing the same kind of cool things, YAY for you! YAY for us! Keep doing it, that’s the kind of stuff we want in our community. Does that make any kind of sense?

Ironically, I had just returned (at about 1:30AM that morning!) from a conference in Austin, where the slogan is, “Austin. Keeping it weird.” I had officially heard about the award that morning, and a bunch of colorful ideas flooded into my mind. I thought I’d say a few words, and that idea got … well … I got carried away. Evidently, whatever I said was OK, because some folk told me, “Whoa! You went all “The Moth” on us!” Other people came up afterwards and said, “Me, too.” Since then, individuals have been telling me they were hearing others talking about it. And I was asked to try to write some of it down and blog it. I’m kind of murky on what exactly I said, but I do still have the approximately 25 words of notes that I scribbled down in the morning. So here goes, not trying to remember word-for-word, but generally trying to keep the same tone and feeling.

JUST A FEW WORDS

I just got back from Austin, where the local badge of pride is reflected in the slogan, “Keeping it weird.” I was looking at tshirts to bring back to the family, and noticed one that I just had to get for myself. (I was actually wearing it at the celebration, but no one could see it becauseI had other garments over it.) The one I had to get was a parody-slash-mashup of Where the Wild Things Are.

Wild Things

The tshirt said, “Where the Weird Things Are.” Of course, I had to get it! Books, right? Right!

Where the weird things are

So they told me that morning that I was going to get the Diversity Award today. I was thinking about weirdness, who’s weird, what does it mean to be weird, how does weirdness tie in with diversity. There was a trending hashtag on Twitter, #DescribeYourselfIn3Words. My first reaction was, “Well, that’s not very diverse! Three words isn’t very much to describe any of us. But I tried. I did it twice. That’s six words. I suppose that’s probably cheating? Here’s what I called myself.

#DescribeYourselfIn3Words: Militant Moderate Librarian

First, I said, “Militant moderate librarian.” To me, this describes my identity, that I am a librarian down to the bone, deep in my soul, and my view of what it means to be a librarian: unbiased by intention and determination. It’s a LOT of work.

#DescribeYourselfIn3Words: Inspire, Be Inspired

Next, I said, “Inspire, be inspired,” which I see as my job description, and I know that many of us working here in this library system feel the same way. I adopted that one from Hugh McLeod, “Gapingvoid.” I saw this years ago, when I was new to being the Emerging Technologies Librarian, and had just gotten my income tax refund, so indulged (HUGELY, this was a BIG indulgence for me) and bought it. It hangs on my wall right now, where I will see it every single day. It means a lot to me.

Gapingvoid: Inspire, Be Inspired

So, while three words aren’t very many, especially in the sense of describing an entire complete unique quirky diverse individual or community, but maybe they can serve as a kind of mission/vision statement, or emotional touchstone.

Library Diversity Celebration: Walk in my shoes.

The theme of today’s event is “Walk in My Shoes.” I’ve been walking around, looking at the displays, reading the signs, reading the stories. They’re pretty amazing. The grandmother who was a ballerina? I love that one. James’ story about the shoes that make you more wonderful when you believe in them? Powerful! Here are my shoes.

My Shoes

Down at the conference in Austin, someone told me they are great classic librarian shoes. Yeah. Boo hiss. I wasn’t too happy, either. I told him these are not so much librarian shoes as medical prescription shoes. I have foot orthotics, and foot pain. I wear these shoes because the orthotics fit into them and because they don’t hurt as much. Before I wore foot orthotics, I had some beautiful shoes. Purple, green, red. Hightops colored like blueberries and lined with soft terrycloth. Deep purple Converse hightops my daughter gave me for my 50th birthday. Spiked heels striped with earth tones. Elegant flats decorated with clip on red and black accents. Tennis shoes that belong in a Brooklyn Museum: Rise of Sneaker Culture, decorated and carved with geisha, comics, flowers, leaves. Leaving footprints that reveal an ukiyo-e kiss.

New Green Shoes: StitcheryNew Green Shoes: Light and Shadow

I love my old shoes. Sometimes I loved them so much that they would wear out, the sole would tear off, and I would save them for years trying to find another pair. Now, I wear old lady librarian shoes, the same pair, all day, every day. And I have a closet of beautiful shoes I can’t wear, but can’t bear to give away, at least not yet.

Curiously, shoes are how I first got into diversity. Really! How many of you remember Highlights Magazine for Children? It had a very distinctive style of art work, and the stories were all educational and/or morally uplifting.

chatold woman with fishbowl and goose

My parents always had a subscription to this, as long as we had kids in the appropriate age ranges, and we had a lot of kids. It must have been when I was very young, just learning to read, when I saw a story about learning to “walk in another man’s moccasins,” only they called it the “in the skin game.” I thought this sounded fantastic, fascinating, amazing! The story asked the children to stop and imagine what the other person in the story might be feeling, where they came from, what their family was like, what was going on that wasn’t visible that made them act the way they did. The story came to an end, but the game didn’t. I found it so deeply engaging and fascinating, I kept doing it. People watching. Trying to understand. Evidently, I never really learned to turn it off!

Lately I’ve been doing a lot of reading about what is called Intergenerational Transmission of Trauma (IGTT). Sometimes it’s called Transgenerational Transmission of Trauma (TGTT).

Google Scholar Search: (“intergenerational transmission of trauma” OR “transgenerational transmission of trauma” OR “inter-generational transmission of trauma” OR “trans-generational transmission of trauma”)

Briefly, the idea is that a predisposition to experiencing traumatic events is passed along from parent to child, like a baton in a race, handed on from generation to generation.

“The idea that a parental traumatic experience could reach the second generation soon gained consistency. Clinical studies reported a wide range of affective and emotional symptoms transmitted over generations: distrust of the world, impaired parental function, chronic sorrow, inability to communicate feelings, an ever-present fear of danger, pressure for educational achievement, separation anxiety, lack of entitlement, unclear boundaries, and overprotectiveness within a narcissist family system.” (Braga, Mello, Fiks, 2012)

Most of the research on this idea has been done in easily identifiable communities which have experienced severe trauma in a generational context. African American families that experienced slavery. Jewish and Polish families of Holocaust survivors. Native American or First People families. Families of war and combat veterans. Refugees. With domestic violence it’s harder to identify a research study cohort, but they’re looking at this, too.

All around the room heads were nodding. How many of us have families that have experienced trauma? How many of us have families that have NOT experienced trauma?

When the research first started, they believed that the process of transmission, of passing along the trauma, came from children imitating the behaviors and beliefs of the parents, or that the parents (consciously or unconsciously) taught the children maladaptive ways to respond to the world, based on their own experiences of trauma. Now, researchers are starting to believe it runs deeper than that. Research is leaning towards the idea that significant trauma of these sorts can literally rewrite our genes, and can change what genes are preferentially passed on to our children. I’ll do another blogpost about this, but just try searching epigenetics of trauma to dip into the literature.

The gist of the idea is that the experience of trauma causes changes to many of our body’s systems, most importantly the immune system, hormone levels (especially cortisol), as well as the brain and nervous system. To put it even more briefly, trauma early in our life or our parent’s lives can make us more likely to get sick physically later, to develop mental illness, and to respond to life in ways that make us more likely to experience trauma ourselves. The changes to the brain either make it so people over react to potentially threatening environments, or under-react. Either way, it puts them (us?) at heightened risk through a response that is out of sync with the actual threat level.

Our friends and colleagues who come from cultures rich in traumatic pasts may still be experiencing things in their own lives that were shaped generations ago. Does that mean that IGTT gives everyone with a familial history of trauma a “get out of jail free” card for responsibility for our own actions? Not exactly. Yes, we have to understand how this shapes trauma across generations, and shapes the actions of people now. Sometimes I’ll ask people, “Be a little more understanding of this lady, she’s in severe pain pretty much all the time, and that’s why she’s a little short tempered. Be patient.” That idea applies here, too. None of us know what the other person is going through, what they have gone through, what their parents or grandparents went through. I wonder how my life might have been different if my mother hadn’t been badly abused as a child, if her mother hadn’t been subjected to extreme prejudice and poverty through racism, if my dad’s dad hadn’t had addictions, and so forth. I might have been a completely different person. I expect most of us have something in our family histories along these lines. There are tales that are not passed along, at least verbally, but they still show in our genes. It can hurt you, even if you never knew it happened.

The good news is that our genes and our family history can ALSO foster resilience! And that for the epigenetic changes we’ve been passing along from generation to generation, we CAN begin to break the cycle. Here are some things that seem to be helping in some communities (with more details and sources coming in another blogpost):

a nurturing social environment;
especially giving added nurturing early in life;
providing safe places and spaces;
giving future at-risk parents support and training in parenting before they become parents;
teaching resilience, appropriate responses to stress and threat;
teaching how and when to trust, building social decisionmaking skills;
giving and modeling genuine healthy attachments, love, and caring;
identifying and dealing with the trauma;
and sleep.

We’re still learning what works, and what works best. To me, it sounds like a big part of the issues of IGTT tie directly into the vision and missions of diversity initiatives in corporations and enterprises all across the world.

Know the problem.
Say the problem.
Change the things that made the problem.

Isn’t this one part of why we have diversity initiatives? Partly to try to fix the problems, partly to stop perpetuating the problems, and partly because there are so many wonderful people and wonderful possibilities that we miss out on when we aren’t including different points of views and different kinds of people. All three of those impact on the day to day life for all of us. Fixing the problems helps reduce crime, improve health, reduce costs, improve creativity, and ultimately improve resilience across our entire society.

To tie this all up, where are the weird things? Well, not just in Austin, that’s for sure. We are all of us weird, just some of us are more weird than others. And that’s ok, as long as we accept it, and make a safe space for everyone. So.

Where the weird things are?

Here.

Here, is where the weird things are.
Us, we are the weird things.

My New (Gapingvoid) Tshirt! (And my job description) 150529

Ann McKee on Boxing, Football, and the Brain (Leiter Lecture) [#mlanet15]

Part 4 of a series of blogposts I wrote for the recent Annual Meeting of the Medical Library Association.


Was it just yesterday? I was sitting in the Leiter Lecture listening to the incredible Dr. Ann McKee present about past, present, and future trends in concussion research. I had been reading about her work in the indie-published award-winning book from 2014, Conquering Concussion, and was very interested in learning more. By the end of the talk, I wasn’t the only person who had tweeted out that I had tears in my eyes.

The story she told that touched me the most was of the athlete who had been diagnosed with ALS, but who phoned her, suspecting that what he really had was, “what you’re studying, Doc.” That would be Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE). Basically, CTE is what happens when you bounce someone’s brain around on a regular basis, and they never really have a chance to heal. Some folk with that history develop CTE, some don’t, and Dr. McKee would really like to know why. To do this research, people or families donate their brains after they die. This athlete had met with her a few times, and there was a relationship, a sense of trust between them. Then the call came (I’m paraphrasing here, working from memory), “Hey, Doc, we’re having a big party! All my family and friends, a big blast. I’ve decided to go off respiratory support, and my docs don’t think I’ll make it through the weekend.” He died the next day. Someone went to pick up his brain, and when they ran the tests, he was right — he did have CTE.

I shared that story later that day in the airport waiting room with a man whose wife and son both had a history of severe concussions. I also shared that Dr. McKee’s insights on a possible genetic connection (for why some folk never develop CTE) and what people can do NOW to help prevent the long term:

* EXERCISE
* Diet (rich in antioxidants)
* Sleep
* Avoid conditions or triggers that cause inflammation in your body

Dr. McKee is also working on finding biomarkers so CTE can be diagnosed before people die, and needs donations of NORMAL brains to be able to identify the differences. A friend of mine asked me on Twitter what qualifies as ‘normal,’ and for this, let’s just say it would be someone who doesn’t have a history of multiple concussions, or subconcussions. There was a lot more, but I’ll limit myself to sharing the Concussion Checklist she recommended, and the Storify, if you want more. There are several interviews with her and other articles about her, if you want to dig in a little more deeply.

GPII Gives me GOOSEBUMPS!

GPII Introductory Video

We all use technology every day. Well, people reading this blog, anyway. We use it, and everywhere we go, we either carry our own devices or spend time fiddling and fussing to make it work right. Or both. So, … have you heard about GPII?

GPII
Global Public Inclusive Infrastructure (GPII): http://www.gpii.net/

It gives me goosebumps, it really does. I’ve been hearing about this via Jane Vincent, author of “Making the Library Accessible to All” and a colleague here at the University of Michigan. Jane has been working on this project for a long time, before she came here. We are so very lucky to have her here and be informed literally at the ground level as this evolves. So what is it? What does “Global Public Inclusive Infrastructure” actually MEAN? It is the ultimate (for now) in portable technology personalization. Basically, how do you prefer to set up your computer? Now, code that into a little snippet, kind of like a credit card, and you take that with you wherever you go. Want to use a computer? Wave your magic card, and voilà! It’s set up just the way you like it.

I am, of course, oversimplifying, so here is a video introduction, and a video demo. Watch them both, and see if they don’t give you goosebumps, too!

Global Public Inclusive Infrastructure (GPII) w/captions and description:

Human Rights Museum Demo Instructions:

A big part of what I like about it is the community behind the idea and the process. Here’s a grateful nod to the following engaged and supporting organizations.

Cloud 4 All
FLOE Project
FLUID Project (which is worth an entire blogpost on their own!)
Prosperity 4 All
Raising the Floor
TRACE Center, University of Wisconsin