Category Archives: Tools for Learning

IFTTT 101

IFTTT Screenshots: homepageIFTTT Screenshots: servicesIFTTT Screenshots: Grant Alerts

I’ve been asked about how I use IFTTT (IF This Then That). which is an app for connecting digital devices and streams in creative and interesting ways. Basically, it allows you to automate ways different tech things can talk to each other, or, as they describe it, ” helps your apps and devices work together in new ways.” Actually I think the real question was about how I use social media, broadly, but this was part of the question, and it’s way easier to answer, so I’m going to start here, with an overview of some interesting recipes, followed by how to find them, and how to make them.

ComputerWorld (2019): What is IFTTT? How to use If This, Then That services
With 11 million users running more than a billion applets a month, IFTTT hopes to become a service that connects pretty much everything — though some users say it still has room for improvement.

RECIPES AND APPLETS

These are some IFTTT recipes and applets that I either actually use, or wish maybe I could. (Hey, I can’t afford all those fancy-schmancy smart home devices!) These include things that streamline some of my work, help me keep up to date, manage my work-life balance, support accommodations for health issues and safety concerns, keep me in tune with hobbies and interests, and more!

Notice that there are often multiple recipes to accomplish what looks like the same task. These are usually made by different people. Sometimes they refine an earlier idea to make it better (like shifting from “remind me to drink water” to “remind me to drink water when I’m not asleep”!), sometimes not so much. If you forget you already have one recipe going for a task, you can end up with duplicate emails or Flickr posts or things like that. And be accused of spamming your Flickr followers. Sometimes you want to try both out to see which one works better. Some of the Instagram to Flickr recipes only work for one image at a time, or one a day, while others are more flexible and robust and will capture everything you do. There are dozens of recipes to help you remember to take your medicines or vitamins at a particular time of day. At least one of them will actually trigger your device to speak aloud to remind you! There are several to send alerts if there is a new clinical trial on diabetes, or asthma, or skin cancer, or …

You get the idea. The basic message is “BUYER” BEWARE. Test it out, try it out, and be prepared to turn it off if it doesn’t do what you expected. Also, watch for unexpected side effects. There have been the occasional report of an IFTTT recipe that, maybe, sends email AS you instead of TO you, just as an example. Another example was someone who used a device to automatically lock their door when they weren’t at home, set up a recipe to verify the door was locked if the door saw an unfamiliar face, then forgot about the recipe, and had trouble trying to UNLOCK the door when it didn’t recognize him. So you want to be careful. Also, just because I link to a recipe below doesn’t mean these have all been vetted or tested. These are examples of the kinds of things you can do with IFTTT, and I have tested SOME of those listed here.

Alert: Reminder to drink water every hour unless you’re asleep (I actually use this as a reminder to take a 3 minute exercise/movement break each hour)

Clinical Trials: Get an email when ClinicalTrials.gov publishes a new trigger or action

Grants: Get an email when there’s a new education-related grant
Grants: Get an email when there’s a new grant that mentions your state or city
Grants: Get an email when there’s a new health-related grant

IFTTT: Get an email when a new service is published on IFTTT

Instagram: Post your Instagram photos to Flickr

NASA: Get a notification when the International Space Station passes over your house
NASA: Receive NASA’s Image of the Day in your inbox
NASA: Did an astronaut exit space? Get a notification
NASA: Did an astronaut enter space? Get a notification

News: Get an email from the New York Times whenever there is breaking technology news
News: Get a weekly email digest of new Pew Research technology articles
News: Automatically tweet updates from Pew Research

Safety: Get yourself out of an awkward situation (International)
Safety: Google Home Find My Phone (“When you ask Google home to find your phone it turns the ringer to 100% and places a VOIP call through IFTT.”
Safety: Ok Google, call my device
Safety: Hey Alexa, call my device

Self-tracking: Log how much time you spend at specific locations like the office or home in a spreadsheet
Self-tracking: Track your work hours in Google Calendar
Self-tracking: When I buy a coffee, log calories to iOS Health

Smart Home: Call me if Roost detects a water leak
Smart Home: Turn on/off your lights with one tap on your phone
Smart Home: Turn on Smart Life device at sunset
Smart Home: Get your Hue Lights to colour loop when it’s Christmas

Twitter: If Twitter #HASHTAG, Then IF Notification

WHO: Get alerts if there’s a disease outbreak news from the World Health Organization

WUnderground: Rain tomorrow? Get a mobile notification
WUnderground: Get a notification and an email if there’s going to be snow tomorrow

YouTube: Add songs from videos you like to a Spotify playlist

Highlighted collections from IFTTT

DISCOVERY: Finding IFTTT Recipes to Meet Your Needs

How do you find these? I usually browse the “Discover” section of the IFTTT app, but I also search for keywords and browse other people’s recommendations. The metadata is dependent on the person who created the recipe, so the words in the title can be really weird sometimes. It helps to get really creative with related words.

IFTTT: Discover: https://ifttt.com/discover

The Ambient, Smart Home (2019): IFTTT essential guide: The best IFTTT Applets for your automated smart home

PC Magazine (2019): The 25 Best IFTTT Applets: If This Then That (IFTTT) integrates activities across your digital services and devices. Here are some of our favorite combinations, or applets.

ComputerWorld (2017): 41 cool and useful IFTTT applets: Want to automatically save articles you’ve liked on Twitter to Pocket? There’s an IFTTT applet for that – and for a lot of other things, too.

Trusted Reviews (2016): 35 amazingly useful IFTTT recipes to simplify your life

Lifehack (2013): 35 Super Useful IFTTT Recipes You Might Not Know About

DIY: Making Your Own IFTTT Recipe

The next question for me, and something I haven’t done yet, is, hmmm, what about all those journal alerts? And search strategies? Or Google News alerts? I wouldn’t want a phone alert for everything, but there might be some where I’d like to know. I can imagine that some of the faculty medical librarians support might like to have something set up for grants in their field, new publication alerts on the topic of their most recent systematic review, or even if someone cited their articles. I don’t know how hard it would be to do this, but I can certainly imagine that we might want to! So, here is an article about how to get started.

How to create an IFTTT recipe https://support.meshprj.com/hc/en-us/articles/213717818-How-to-create-an-IFTTT-recipe

Coding and tech comics & coloring books

First posted at https://michigan.it.umich.edu/news/2017/12/19/comics-coloring-books/


We are coming up quickly on the winter break, with families gathered and children out of school. With that in mind, it might be fun to have some some (slightly eccentric?) options for family activities and young folk distractions. Even better if these are options that promote learning, or just understanding more about what the old folks do with their days, eh? Here are a few highlights from my collections of (mostly free) comics, coloring books, and games around the world of geekery, coding, and tech. Who knows? Maybe you’ll find something that tickles your own funny bone!

A FORTRAN Coloring Book

Coloring Books

The first coding coloring book I could find dates from 1978 — Roger Kaufman’s FORTRAN Coloring Book, actually published by MIT Press and used as a textbook, back in the day. I was tickled pink when I found it, in part because I remember by Dad coding in FORTRAN when I was a young thing. (Yes, I have a copy on paper in my office. Honest!) It is robustly humorous for actual coders, and probably not as much fun for kids today. It is, however, available in the fabulous Internet Archive (but you might have to wait your turn to get access, since it is still under copyright).

Another rather amusing tongue-in-cheek (optionally NSFW) geek coloring book comes from the infamous Oatmeal. Check out 404 Not Found (and 404 Not Found NSFW). Not free.

With coloring books about coding going back so many decades, I thought there must be more, and oh my, there are.

ABC++ [PDF] (free)

The Coder’s Coloring Book [PDF] (free)

Kevin’s Python Coding Coloring Book (usually around $7)

Lady Ada’s E is For Electronics Coloring Book [PDF] (free as PDF, or you can buy a copy for $9.95)
(You might want to see also Lady Ada’s R is for Robots, which is not free.)

Programmer’s coloring book (About) [PDF] (free)

The SELinux Coloring Book (Github) [PDF] (free)

Soldering is Easy (free, but no PDF, only individual page downloads)

The Imitation Game, by Jim Ottaviani

Comics, Graphic Novels, Zines, Etc.

– About Coding & Tech-

These include comix for kids and comix for pros, but even those for kids are so well done I get a giggle out of them.

BubbleSort Zines. (Includes zines like “Hip Hip Array!” as well as t-shirts and jewelry such as “BYTE ME!”) (not free)

Code Cartoons (such as A Cartoon Guide to Flux and more) (free)

Google Chrome comic by Scott McCloud (free)

Grokking Algorithms: An illustrated guide for programmers and other curious people (~$17 onAmazon)

Hello, Ruby (for ages 5 and up) (not free, but free stuff available for downloading at the site)

How DNS Works (start here) (free)

Linux comics, a small zine. Others from the same author include “Let’s Learn tcpdump,” “Spying on your programs with trace,” and “Networking! ACK!” (free)

What Makes a Clock Tick (free)

Why’s Poignant Guide to Ruby (free)

– About Geekery Other Than Coding –

We are very lucky here to have Jim Ottaviani on campus as a hard core science geek who loves and loves to make comics. I could hardly talk about comics and coding without mentioning his collaboration with Leland Purvis, The Imitation Game: Alan Turing Decoded! But there are more comics and graphic novels about coders, geeks, and the work and culture they love. This is just a few selected titles, not at all comprehensive (try searching cyberpunk graphic novels to see what I mean). [NOTE: These are mostly NOT free, but for sale at bookstores both analog and virtual.]

Alice in Quantumland: An Allegory of Quantum Physics

William Gibson’s Neuromancer

The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace and Babbage: The (Mostly) True Story of the First Computer (Pantheon Graphic Novels)

Tom Clohosy Cole’s Space Race

(And if this isn’t enough to keep people busy, you can always make your own, one way or another.)

Teach Feast: Engaged Learning Through Internships, Badges, e-Portfolios, & Storytelling


Teach Feast 2015: integrative tools for engagement at Michigan http://www.slideshare.net/umhealthscienceslibraries/teach-feast-2015-integrative-tools-for-engagement-at-michigan

I was invited as a last minute fill-in to be part of a panel at the annual Teach Feast festival of learning technologies at the University of Michigan. It was a great learning experience for me, and I hope also for the participants. I learned more about how engaged learning can be a continuum, incorporating relatively small or subtle changes to traditional instruction or going whole hog and literally uprooting a student from their culture and context and positioning them in a new space for a different type of learning experience. Engagement can originate with either student or teacher (or both); it can be collaborative and/or competitive and/or creative. The one part that seemed foundational to all the strategies was reflection, turning your gaze both inward and outward.

My part was on digital storytelling. I’m a big fan of digital storytelling, in case you didn’t know. I like to test new online storytelling tools, and see how they work to support different kinds of stories. My current fascination with comics is based out of my larger enthusiasm for storytelling. I argue that storytelling is part of every academic discipline. It’s obvious that the humanities dissolve if you remove stories. What is history without story? But when it comes to the sciences, people are more likely to have trouble seeing the story as part of the academic process. Of course, case studies in health care, sure, those are stories. And psychology and psychiatry, they don’t work without stories. Social work, yeah, of course. But physics? And engineering? Maybe if you aren’t in the field you have trouble seeing the story, but if you really think about every research paper, every structured abstract is a frame for a story. Every piece of science has a backstory, a motivation, a reason someone wanted to know THIS. Even mathematics. Even when camouflaged, the stories of science are implied. What changes isn’t the presence of the story, but how we tell them, and the tools we use to carry them.

The advantages of digital storytelling are similar to those of printed stories: portable, inclusive, persistent, and reaching a broader audience. One of the great lessons from education is that communication is never one-size-fits-all. The more ways you present important content, the more people will be able to understand it and engage with it. The greater the variety of media you use to tell a story, the more people will hear it. I’m happy to help people find and tell stories, especially science stories. There are a lot of different types of tools and resources in the slides. If I have time, I’ll spend a little more time on specific ones here some other time. If there is something in particular from the slides that you’d like me to talk about, say so in the comments, and I’ll make it a priority.

Infographic of the Week: HHS Infographics Collection!

HHS Infographics on Flickr
Flickr: Group: HHS Infographics: https://www.flickr.com/groups/hhsinfographics/

I just discovered a Flickr group that collects infographics from the US Department of Health and Human Services. WOW. Talk about a great resource! There are many infographics in the collection, and also marketing images for specific health challenges or initiatives.

HHS Infographics on Flickr

This isn’t all they have, though! You can many of these in sets or albums from the HHSgov Flickr Stream.

Flickr: HHS: Sets: Health Care Infographics: https://www.flickr.com/photos/hhsgov/sets/72157633968047018/

Flickr: HHS: Sets: HHS Infographics: https://www.flickr.com/photos/hhsgov/sets/72157632180365890/

Now, it is completely wonderful to have a one stop shop to go hunt health infographics from a reliable source and of known high quality. Extremely useful! But this is even better than that. Because these are in a Flickr Group, there are many other things you can do.

If you have a Flickr account, you can request to join to track the images that appear in the group, or you can use the RSS feed from the group in your feed reader.

You could set up a computer display in a public area, and start the “slideshow” view from the group as a way to engage the public around quality health information.

Because these are licensed as “United States government work,” you can download these, re-use them, post them yourself, put them on your website, edit and modify them. As they say:

Anyone may, without restriction under U.S. copyright laws:
* reproduce the work in print or digital form;
* create derivative works;
* perform the work publicly;
* display the work;
* distribute copies or digitally transfer the work to the public by sale or other transfer of ownership, or by rental, lease, or lending.

Niiiiiice.

However, because these are in Flickr, the absolute easiest way to share them is to just embed them on your webpage or site, or share the link wherever you wish. Here’s an example.

Recently, I’ve been seeing many conversations on social media, on Twitter, Facebook, and in blogs, about issues with patients access to their electronic health record and problems with the accuracy of the information in their record. Right now, this is again a timely issue. The HHS has a series of four short infographics on exactly this topic. I can choose one or any or all and, with a Flickr account, grab the embed code to put them in this blogpost without having to download or upload or rename or identify or worry about the accessibility of the code. Here’s what it looks like.

Know Your HIPAA Rights #1Know Your HIPAA Rights #2
Know Your HIPAA Rights #3Know Your HIPAA Rights #4

If someone clicks on any of the four images above, it will take them to the original image, in a larger size. The source is right there, and I didn’t have to do the work. So very helpful. I love this resource. So glad I found them!

Learn about Making, 2: Videos

Reblogged from Health Design By Us



We #makehealth Fest- August 16th! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QxWMpCMInNA

Here’s more on learning about making, today with videos! I started writing this post talking about how to find videos about making and #makehealth to learn more about them, and then Andrew Maynard was inspired to make a RiskBites-style video for us!!! Can you tell I’m excited? I refrained from more than three exclamation points. So, please, watch our video first (it’s short), but the rest of the post is about videos by other people about making.


INTRODUCTION

Maker, the Movie (Screenshot)
Maker, the Movie: http://makerthemovie.com

Last week I talked about the summer camp and the online course. If you dug into those you would have probably found their videos! There are a lot more, however, and there is even a MOVIE about the maker movement, and we are going to show it over the lunch hour at our event. It is going to be great!

Below you will find a sampling of videos illustrating some of the range of what’s available on the topic of making. Included are both general making and health making, finding good Youtube Channels, persons, “topics”, and project examples. In each category, I’ll try to highlight at least one and then give links to more in each category.


FLASHBACK TO LAST WEEK

Maker learning events NOW

First a few videos from the groups highlighted last week.

The Google Science Fair just had a Google Hangout with last year’s winner, Eric Chen. Eric’s project was: “Computer-aided Discovery of Novel Influenza Endonuclease Inhibitors to Combat Flu Pandemic.”

Come Hangout On Air with the 2013 Grand Prize Winner of Google Science Fair! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E5CezSabRTA

The MOOC course on Tinkering? They not only had a brief video to introduce the idea of the class, with more videos and tutorials in the class, but then had Hangouts during the source, all of which are archived online.

Fundamentals of Tinkering (Screenshot)
Fundamentals of Tinkering http://vimeo.com/92558395

Tinkering Studio (Channel): https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtx1xfSh01cJ8WYsFeKt7RQ
Tinkering Fundamentals: Week One Hangout https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iad280GF_rk
Tinkering Fundamentals Integrating Making Activities into Your STEM Classroom https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zvDd1rwxRJU

Make Magazine (Screenshot)MakerFaire Videos (Screenshot)

The Maker Camp people also have their own video channel, with interviews and archived Hangouts. Not only do they have the Maker Camp videos, but also the Maker Faire videos, AND individual projects from Make Magazine. I was surprised to find that they ALSO have some video from these various maker sources included in the channel for their sister publication CraftZine.

CraftZine (Screenshot)

Maker Camp: Blasting Off with Buzz Aldrin and NASA https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7CDwz-bZtBc


CHANNELS FOCUSED ON MAKING

Adam Savage's TESTED (Screenshot)Household Hacker (Screenshot)

Adam Savage: Tested: https://www.youtube.com/user/testedcom
Google Science Fair: https://www.youtube.com/user/GoogleScienceFair
Household Hacker: https://www.youtube.com/user/HouseholdHacker
Maker Magazine: https://www.youtube.com/user/makemagazine
Maker Faire: https://www.youtube.com/user/MakerFaireVideo
Tinkering Studio: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtx1xfSh01cJ8WYsFeKt7RQ


MAKE HEALTH CHANNELS

Hacking Health (Screenshot)NIH 3D Print Exchange (Screenshot)

Some of these channels are people talking about things they’ve learned how to do. Other are from organizations, even ones like NIH or the NHS (UK). Some of them are kind of conservative, while others are edgy, or even risky. (For example, I was a little floored when I saw a video on how to remove magnetized sensors from under your skin.) One of my favorites is the new service from NIH for people sharing tips and tricks with 3D printing. Some of these people have gotten so good at what they are doing they have become consultants and are selling their services for training, so you might see advertisements. Despite that, these are just a small selection of the various types of people and organizations sharing information about tools and techniques for improving your own health (beyond diet and exercise).

21 Convention: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuErSr7xeR763BzTJL7yJ7A
Bulletproof Executive: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1Aq3T1GmKcObLqo1YIU_Ww
DIYbioNYC: https://www.youtube.com/user/DIYbioNYC
FAB Research: https://www.youtube.com/user/FABResearch
GrindHouseWetWares: https://www.youtube.com/user/grindhousewetwares
Hack Cancer: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC54gHiExrTiTPQuvb7MuRYA
Hack Health Day 2012: https://www.youtube.com/user/healthhackday2012
Maarten den Braber: https://www.youtube.com/user/mdbraber
Manuel Corpas: https://www.youtube.com/user/manuelcorpas2
microBEnet: https://www.youtube.com/user/microBEnet
NIH 3D Print Exchange: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNmPN3UVxRrKbgsxSIKFxzQ
NHS: Open Data Platform Hack: https://www.youtube.com/user/ODPhack
Official Simpleology: https://www.youtube.com/user/OfficialSimpleology
Personal Genomes Org: https://www.youtube.com/user/PersonalGenomesOrg
Personal Genomics Institute: https://www.youtube.com/user/pgiinfo
Quantified Self & Biohacking Finland: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbwaE6GhLCmN3CiNgaXjfTw
Quantified Self Labs: https://www.youtube.com/user/quantifiedselflabs
Seth Bordenstein: https://www.youtube.com/user/sbordenstein
Yohanan Winogradsky: https://www.youtube.com/user/microbiome


TOPICS


Ellen Jorgensen: Biohacking — you can do it, too: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AWEpeW7Ojzs

You probably already know that you can subscribe on Youtube to follow the videos of a particular user, but did you know that you can also subscribe to follow specific topics? Here are just a few I’ve selected to highlight topics related to making health, as well as tools and techniques often used by people interested in taking charge of their own health.

Topic: 23andMe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCOWtXjptyLopXxfhZDS5uNQ
Topic: Activity Tracker: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPHw-0Y6vrHNhWZTrYQFnCg
Topic: Biohacking: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKShU3O_v1o07Gy30tvdiAg
Topic: Digital Health: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UChAXVgotFdbmPw55UKRTUrw
Topic: e-Patient: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCxq1ua3HKlDlaXyE7pWTwaQ
Topic: Gut flora: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCeEHjg6NKgv_LWqw1StKuxQ
Topic: Human Microbiome: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCORCj6yiQvXqAqy8h5kD8UA
Topic: Life logging: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCw-8rJiO84hyglLzs0ioLlw
Topic: Microbiome: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFjMxsa7J9h_X0_tt5kkCBQ
Topic: Patients Like Me: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCn-TkpPlBPaQfStmYc7c3_A
Topic: Personal genomics: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmpW3xCzFPTz5CCLgQdrPbw
Topic: Personalized medicine: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCkivXFgjqMrNi38P9LPH1lw
Topic: Quantified Self: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUwK10M7andc8qcjk1171ug
Topic: Shared decision making: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCOLP8MoklY9nkNLLgkEcuwg
Topic: Synthetic Biology: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwYKhJVNj4D6tQjArn-Odtg
Topic: Wearable Computer: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1iTALBPyYMh6HcetVD8Txw
Topic: Wearable Technology: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCihxzUkujQoQzuM_aA4peJA


PROJECTS & MAKEHEALTH INSPIRATIONS


Beautifully Disgusting E Coli

Here are just a few randomly selected examples of individual videos on projects. If you come up with an idea for something you want to try, maybe someone else has already done it, and you don’t have to completely make it from scratch! The search box may be your friend, you never know until you look.

Adam Savage’s One Day Builds: Custom Multi-Tool Belt Holster: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Et-JvYrQ84o
Bulletproof Executive: Podcast #140 – Hacking Memory and Focus with Mattias Ribbing – Bulletproof Executive Radio: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SHuuwsUg2m0&list=UU1Aq3T1GmKcObLqo1YIU_Ww
HouseholdHacker: Beautifully Disgusting E Coli: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X-Q8TIHbipQ
Outfitting the Kitchen – Still Untitled: The Adam Savage Project – 7/8/2014: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-U-whV93wBc&list=UUiDJtJKMICpb9B1qf7qjEOA
Personal Cooling Unit: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BeLa72oSf3c
Pollution Shirt Senses Foul Air: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UHEww6eX4wc
Weekend Projects – Non-Contact Voltage Detector: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tTxIR_jAEL4
Weekend Projects – “Raspberry Eye” Remote Servo Cam: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tSJ-sWEJ5EU

About Make & Takes for Health (#makehealth)

#UMSIMakerfest !!!

As people start to think about getting involved with the Make Health Fest, we are hearing a lot of three questions in particular.

1) What is a maker fest or maker faire?
2) If I want to have a booth, I’m supposed to have a Make & Take? What does that mean?
3) I’m a geek / tinker / hacker from way back, and I’d like to be involved, but I’m not sure if what I do connects with health enough to qualify. What do you mean, “relates to health”?

Last week we addressed #1 in a post by me and another by Joyce; this post is for question #2 on Make&Takes; and hopefully tomorrow will have a post for question #3, connecting making to health.

Part of the confusion with the phrase “Make and Take” might be that the phrase means one thing to folk in the maker community and something else to the world at large. After all, this is summer, and there are potlucks and backyard picnics galore! I picked up a magazine called “Make & Take” that was all about recipes for cooking for potlucks and picnics. You make the food, and then you take it to the party! Or the other “Make & Take” is planning for road trips with the kids — make games or guides or handouts to take for entertaining the kids in the family car while you drive somewhere on vacation, or for teachers or homeschooling. This is a little different.

What makes a maker event so very different from the usual science fair or health fair or vendor exhibit is the actual MAKING. Booths and demos and speakers all are not just saying, “I can do something cool,” or “I have information to share with you,” but rather, “Can I show you how to do this cool thing? Come here and try it yourself!” I always wish I had a month at each Maker Faire instead of an afternoon! I want to learn how to do everything!

The idea of “Make and Take” is to, (1), have something at the booth that people do with their own hands, beyond showing them how, and (2) have something they can take away with them. Ideally, the part they take away is something they actually made, but to be honest, that’s an ideal that is rarely achieved. Usually, people in the booths do a demo and give away a sample; or they give a handout on how to do what they showed you. Often, they’ll let you practice making something at the event, but you may or may not be able to take it with you. Here are some examples of “Make and Take” activities from other fairs and fests, and then I’ll share some examples of health-themed make and take ideas. Feel free to adopt one for our fest if you want, but even better, come up with your own idea!

TAKE

Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2013Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2014Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2014

Level one is to have something people can take away. That’s pretty easy, and most everyone can come up with examples: pins, buttons, stickers, labels, bookmarks, patterns, resource lists, stories, web links, open source code repositories, free apps to download later, free samples, how to and DIY guide sheets, … Remember! At the “take” level of “make & take” you really need to combine it with a live demo at the very least.

MAKE OR DO

Most of the examples I have are of “Make” or “Do” types of activities. That is the real focus in maker events. These are examples from maker events that were not focused on health, so think of them more as inspiration rather than direct models for what you might do.

Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2013Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2013Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2014

Learning models and toys, games to play that teach concepts or build skills, art and design both to create new things and also relieve stress.

#UMSIMakerfest !!!Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2014Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2013

Skills building, stress relief, practical applications, comfort, building or designing your own tools.

#UMSIMakerfest !!!Maker Faire Detroit 2013Detroit Maker Faire 2013

Starting with LEGOs might seem frivolous, but it isn’t. Recently a high school student built a Braille printer out of LEGOs! Let kids start with various materials that appeal to them, and who knows what they’ll come up with! Let them test out using new tech and imaging uses for it. For the laser light show, the kids interacted with the system to make the show do what they wanted. Real hands on experience builds both skills and interest.

Detroit Maker Faire 2013Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2014Lego blue heart

Sometimes it just isn’t practical to let folk take what they made with them, or the set up is complicated, messy, requires fancy equipment (like the weaving loom above), you don’t have very many (like the electronic musical instruments in the middle picture), or is costly (supplying every kid who walks in with all the LEGOs they want? Yeah, sure).

Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2013Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2013Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2013

Skills building. Say that three times. Training kits, tutorials, hands-on, basic skills.

MAKE AND TAKE

#UMSIMakerfest !!!Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2013Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2014
Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2013Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2014Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2013

The “Make and Takes” where you actually get to make something and take it with you? That is totally the coolest, if you can manage it. Maybe you make part of it ahead of time (decorating cookies, anyone?). Or connect something people make (paper airplane) with something they do (turbo charged take-off!) and then let folk take the paper airplane with them. Or print off a paper model pattern and walk them through making one. Or do a demo of sustainable gardening, and let them have a taste of a salad with the same type of plants, or give them seeds to take home. You get the idea.

HEALTH MAKE & TAKES

Those were all examples of “Make and Takes” from Maker Faires usually more generally focused on science and technology. We were brainstorming ideas for “Make and Takes” more along the idea of health, and realized many of the same ideas work. Sustainable gardening connects with a lot of public health issues — diet, nutrition, food deserts, green living, etc. We took our ideas and clustered them into ideas that are clearly and explicitly medical in nature as well as things made with easy-to-find ingredients from around normal homes and schools. Then someone had the great idea of a Fix-It Booth for folk who want to tweak or repair their own medical devices at home (crutches, hearing aids, jar grippers, etc.). We don’t know which of these will happen, if any, because we’re still gathering volunteers, speakers, presenters, and so forth. But if you want inspiration for ideas for a booth, here are some that might give you ideas.

* Bee-safe wasp catcher
* DIY lip gloss
* DIY lotion
* Duct Tape for Health
* First Aid Kit Supplies
* Fruit fly catcher
* Home Cleansers & the Microbiome
* Kitchen herb garden
* Mechanical Paper Hand
* MEDIKit (Medical Education Design and Invention Kit)
* Melon Brain
* Miura Battery Fold
* Neck Pillow
* Origami DNA
* Origami Microcrope
* Radish Rose
* Seed bombs
* Soap-making
* Stethoscope
* Superglue Uses for Health
* Vegetable flowers
* Wine bottle garden
* Wrist brace/splint

Want more ideas? Here are some of the sources that inspired us.

Cari Young: Library Makerspace ideas on Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/cari_young/library-makerspaces/

DIY.org: https://diy.org/tags/medicine

Franklin Institute: Science DIY: http://www.pinterest.com/TheFranklin/science-diy/

Instructables: http://www.instructables.com/howto/health/

Little Devices: 7 DIY Medical Technologies You Can Build At Home: http://littledevices.org/research/7-diy-medical-technologies-you-can-build-at-home/

MakerNurse: http://makernurse.org

Naked Scientists: Kitchen Science: http://www.thenakedscientists.com/HTML/content/kitchenscience/

Pakistan Science Club: http://www.paksc.org/pk/diy-projects

Wiki How: http://www.wikihow.com/Special:GoogSearch?cx=008953293426798287586%3Amr-gwotjmbs&cof=FORID%3A10&ie=UTF-8&q=health+OR+medicine&siteurl=www.wikihow.com%2FMain-Page

University of Michigan Trends & Technology Team, February 2014

I’ve been part of the UM Trends & Tech Team for several years, and have always found it to be one of my most rewarding campus groups. We had a meeting earlier today, and I participated via Google Hangout. People often ask me where I find the cool things I share with others. Well, it isn’t something anyone can do alone. I follow lots of news services, blogs, and similar online resources, but I also depend on great people and communities, like this one.

For today’s meeting, the notes were exceptionally clear, and I was able to catch almost all of the resources mentioned. We had a few main topics, and our usual round-the-table sharing session (which is the best part, in my view). The two topics were badges and project management. While these aren’t explicitly medical or library focused, both are topics of importance to the work we do. Screenshots and links are in the slideshow above. Brief overview descriptions below.

BADGES

The idea of “Badges” is one of the recent innovations in education, and a subset of “gamification,” as mentioned in the new Horizon Report. You’ll understand the idea of Badges if you think of scouting, and the way kids train to win badges in specific skillsets. Here’s the official definition.

“A badge is a symbol or indicator of an accomplishment, skill, quality or interest. From the Boy and Girl Scouts, to PADI diving instruction, to the more recently popular geo-location game, Foursquare, badges have been successfully used to set goals, motivate behaviors, represent achievements and communicate success in many contexts. A “digital badge” is an online record of achievements, tracking the recipient’s communities of interaction that issued the badge and the work completed to get it. Digital badges can support connected learning environments by motivating learning and signaling achievement both within particular communities as well as across communities and institutions. (Source: Erin Knight White Paper)” From: MozillaWiki: https://wiki.mozilla.org/Badges

Here are some of the badges resources our team has found and is discussing. This highly selected set includes examples of how folk are using them, tools to support badge projects, and more.

AADL Summer Game http://play.aadl.org/
Badg.Us http://badg.us/en-US/badges/
Badgelab https://badgelab.herokuapp.com/
BadgeWidgetHack http://badgewidgethack.org/
Credly https://credly.com/
Open Badges http://openbadges.org/
Purdue Passport http://www.itap.purdue.edu/studio/passport/

PROJECT MANAGEMENT

Most of us have some sort of project we’re trying to manage, either at work or at home, even if it only means keeping our own lives a bit more organized. There was a subgroup of the team that has been looking at different project management tools, testing them out, and coming back sharing thoughts on what they like or don’t like. Here is a small group of the tools and add-ons mentioned in today’s meeting.

Asana https://asana.com/
Asana + Box http://blog.asana.com/2014/02/boxintegration/
Asana + M-Box http://www.itcs.umich.edu/storage/box/
Basecamp https://basecamp.com/
Evernote https://evernote.com/
Evernote – Kustomnote https://kustomnote.com/
Evernote – Taskclone http://www.taskclone.com/
Evernote app center http://appcenter.evernote.com/
Evernote Food http://evernote.com/food/
JIRA https://www.atlassian.com/software/jira
Trello https://trello.com/
Zoho https://www.zoho.com/projects/

SHARING

My favorite part of the meetings is always when we go around the table. People share projects they are working on, tools they are using, challenges they are struggling to overcome, tips, tricks, tools, news, updates, and more. Sometimes everyone has already heard about something, sometimes no one has except the person talking about it. Some of the tips were about hardware (Chromecast & Google Cast, DASH, Kitkat, Mophie). Many are always about mobile apps, which our group seems to love. There are usually a few coding tools (Fluid, Codepen). Of course, the best part is hearing what people are doing with all of these (especially the CIO using Ideascale and LSA’s brilliant social media campaign #powerof5), but if I added that in for everything, this post would be way too long. You’ll just have to explore the links on your own, or come to the meetings, eh?

Chromecast http://www.google.com/intl/en-US/chrome/devices/chromecast/
CodePen http://codepen.io
DASH https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/hellobragi/the-dash-wireless-smart-in-ear-headphones
Day One http://dayoneapp.com
DeMobo http://www.demobo.com/product.html
Dial2Do http://www.dial2do.com/
EtcML http://www.etcml.com
Fluid http://fluidapp.com/
Google Cast https://developers.google.com/cast/
HipChat https://www.hipchat.com/
Ideascale https://ideascale.com/
Ideascale for UM http://cesandbox.ideascale.com/
KitKat http://www.android.com/kitkat/
MOPHIE http://www.mophie.com/shop/space-pack-iphone-5s
Netlytic https://netlytic.org/
Paper (53) http://www.fiftythree.com/paper
Paper (Facebook) https://www.facebook.com/paper
Paperpile https://paperpile.com
Powerof5 http://lsapowerof5.tumblr.com/
Powerof5 https://tagboard.com/powerof5
Slack https://slack.com/
UM Staff Stories http://hr.umich.edu/staffstories/category/stories/
Touch Room http://touchroomapp.com
TV Tag (GetGlue) http://tvtag.com/
VSCOCAM https://vsco.co/vscocam

Science Games on Twitter — Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of January 27, 2014)

Games? On Twitter? Oh, my, yes. And the games, while quite entertaining, also foster serious purposes, from engagement in educational outcomes and flipping the classroom to efforts to reimagine the name of peer-review and professional publication. Here are a few examples (#GreenGlam, #SixWordPeerReview, and #PrincessBrideScience), showing beauty, humor, fun, wit, and some rather insightful thoughts.

#GreenGlam

I was struck by the creativity of the #GreenGlam project from the Jahren Lab at the University of Hawai’i at Manoa. From what I’ve been able to piece together, it seems that #GreenGlam started life as a “gamification” of a learning exercise for the students there. Luckily for the rest of us, it didn’t stop there, but garnered views, pictures, tweets, and engagement from a broader community. I can easily imagine using this concept to assign med students to locate Creative Common pathology images to share meeting specific guidelines, for example. Or images to support health literacy or public health outreach. Best infographic on [X] topics. What do you imagine? Here are some lovely selections from the students in Hawai’i to counterbalance the extreme cold we have here this week.

#SixWordPeerReview

While the complaints and humor about the idea of peer review remain fairly typical of similar hashtags in other years, I was impressed with how the conversations around #SixWordPeerReview eventually turned to discussions of how to improve the peer review process in general. Here are some of the humorous tweets as well as some of the more thoughtful ones.

#PrincessBrideScience

Alright, this is an indulgence. I’ve always enjoyed the film Princess Bride, but it never entered my mind to adapt it to a conversation around … science? And science education? And scientific methods? I’m still shaking my head with incredulity and delight at some of the clever puns and offerings from the #PrincessBrideScience stream.

NOTE: The tweet immediately above is in reference to this week’s new scandal:


First posted at THL Blog: http://thlibrary.wordpress.com/2014/01/27/science-games-on-twitter-hashtags-of-the-week-hotw-week-of-january-27-2014/

Finding & Using Images, Lessons Learned (the Hard Way)

I can talk for a very long time about finding Creative Commons and Public Domain images, and the tricks and troubles associated with doing so. This is going to be an image-heavy words-light post about some of what I’ve learned over the past several years. For the short short version, go right to the bottom for my favorite places to find images to use.

What is Creative Commons?

Creative Commons: New License Chooser

Many people say “Creative Commons” as a one-size-fits-all term for I-can-use-this-picture-without-paying-money-and-not-get-in-legal-trouble. That isn’t what it means. Some people still believe that they can take and use any image on any website. This is not remotely true! I myself use a lot of screenshots, and had some earnest worried talks with University Counsel before starting to do so. Strictly speaking, the screenshots may be a questionable practice from a legal point of view, but it has become common practice and rarely causes a problem as long as the site is open to the public. The caveat? If someone complains, be prepared to take the image down, and apologize.

Most of the images people are thinking of that fall into the safe-to-use category are actually public domain. Creative Commons usually applies when someone made a new image that could be copyrighted and has chosen to give advance permissions for some types of use, but not all. This means you can re-use the images in some ways, but can still get into trouble if you don’t do something they asked (like keep their name with the image) or do something they asked people NOT to do (like rework the image).

The Creative Commons organization has a tool to help people decide what license to choose for their own images. I find that tool very helpful in understanding how the creator of the image was thinking about their own work, and thus allowing me to be more respectful of their stated requirements.

Creative Commons: http://creativecommons.org/

Choose a License: http://creativecommons.org/choose/

University of Michigan Libraries Research Guides: Creative Commons: http://guides.lib.umich.edu/content.php?pid=483716

What is Public Domain?

Public domain basically means when an image or text is not copyrightable. This can be because of who created it, what type of information it includes, or that it used to be copyrighted and is now too old. The best simple overview of this is from Lolly Gasaway.

Lolly Gasaway: When US Works Pass Into the Public Domain: http://www.unc.edu/~unclng/public-d.htm

If you want a lot more information about public domain, check out the manifesto, which discusses many of the issues of public domain in the contemporary online environment.

The Public Domain Manifesto: http://www.publicdomainmanifesto.org/node/8

I Can Use This Because It’s Old … Maybe

Historic images are often considered to be public domain, but … not always. If the photograph of the original image is copyrighted, then it doesn’t matter how old the original was. If I went to a museum, they probably won’t allow me to take pictures. If they do, and I take a picture of a painting there (like this picture of St. Apollonia from the University of Michigan Sindecuse Museum of Dentistry), there are issues with (a) did I have permission to take the image, (b) did I have permission to share the image, (c) did I give permission to use or share the image, and so forth.

Sindecuse Museum of Dentistry: St. Apollonia

OR (and this is important), I could follow the assumptions of the Wikimedia Commons team:

The official position taken by the Wikimedia Foundation is that “faithful reproductions of two-dimensional public domain works of art are public domain, and that claims to the contrary represent an assault on the very concept of a public domain”. For details, see Commons:When to use the PD-Art tag. This photographic reproduction is therefore also considered to be in the public domain.

In that case, a straight-on shot of the complete work is usually considered safe to use. That is also the case for this next image.

This next image is of a Japanese calligraphy created in 1923. In USA law, that would be in the public domain. I found it in Wikimedia Commons, my favorite place to find public domain and creative commons images. Why I like them best is because they give the full provenance (or history) of the image, why they think it is legally ok to use, where they got it, and what license or credit should be given with the image when used.

Example public domain image

From Wikimedia Commons


File:Zen painting and calligraphy on silk signed Hachijûgo (85 year old) Nantembô Tôjû, 1923.jpg: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Zen_painting_and_calligraphy_on_silk_signed_Hachij%C3%BBgo_(85_year_old)_Nantemb%C3%B4_T%C3%B4j%C3%BB,_1923.jpg

Because this is considered public domain, there is no license statement provided with it, but if I dig into the information in the image summary, I can find more about where it come from to provide a proper source and attribution. Notice that the image is actually from a book or journal, still in print, and available for purchase. I am sure glad that Wikimedia made the judgment call on this one, because I would not feel safe using it if they had not already established precedent.

Description
English: Zen painting and calligraphy on silk by Nakahara Nantenbo signed “Hachijūgo (85 year old) Nantembō Tōjū”, 1923
Date: 1923
Source: Andon, No. 85, p. 59
Author: Nakahara Nantenbo

Because it is considered public domain, I can do pretty much ANYTHING with it. I can use it in writings or slides, change its format, reprint it as a poster or tshirt and sell it, recolor it, make it 3D, make a parody of it, convert it into music, move it into a virtual world, and so forth. In the image below, I moved it into Second Life, where I made a poster of it for the wall of a memorial for the victims of the 2011 Japanese tsunami.

Pic of the day - Sad Face

I Can Use This Because I Made It Different … Sometimes

Here’s a similar example, with important differences.

From Wikimedia Commons

Low-resolution image of Escher’s Relativity print


Escher’s Relativity: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Escher%27s_Relativity.jpg

Now this one is from 1953, and is not out of copyright anywhere in the world. Even more confusing, the image is taken directly from Escher’s own official website. How can they get away with this?

“This image is of a drawing, painting, print, or other two-dimensional work of art, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the artist who produced the image, the person who commissioned the work, or the heirs thereof. It is believed that the use of low-resolution images of works of art for critical commentary on
* the work in question,
* the artistic genre or technique of the work of art or
* the school to which the artist belongs
on the English-language Wikipedia, hosted on servers in the United States by the non-profit Wikimedia Foundation, qualifies as fair use under United States copyright law.”

People love this print, and it has been re-used in many different ways. Here is an example of a couple of avatars wandering around in a 3d replica of the space.

Cool Toys Pic of the day - Primtings Museum

Here is a link to a copyrighted image of a reconstruction of the print as a real world 3d object, made with … LEGOs.

Escher’s “Relativity” in LEGO®: http://www.andrewlipson.com/escher/relativity.html

What makes these ok? They aren’t exactly low-rez images, but what they are is substantially innovative reworkings of the original concept. That can be a tricky point in intellectual property law, so don’t trust on it as a get-out-of-jail-free-card.

I Can Use This Because the Government Made It … Maybe

There is a perception that it is OK to take and use any image on any website that has a government web address (“.gov”). Often that’s pretty close, but again, it is not always true, only sometimes. Sometimes the government uses images made by other people who are not government employees. Rights for those images belong to the person who made them, or to the company they work for. You need to know which, and you usually need to ask first just to be sure. Read the fine print.

“Some of these photos are in the public domain or U.S. government works and may be used without permission or fee. However, some images may be protected by license or copyright. You should read the disclaimers on each site before using these images.” U.S. Government Photos and Images: http://www.usa.gov/Topics/Graphics.shtml

So, I’m a bit of an astro fan, and just love astronomy images. Here is one from the Hubble telescope, credited to NASA, the European Space Agency, and Hubble themselves.

Cat's Eye Nebula
Cat’s Eye Nebula: http://hubblesite.org/gallery/album/pr2004027a/
Credit: NASA, ESA, HEIC, and The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)
Acknowledgment: R. Corradi (Isaac Newton Group of Telescopes, Spain) and Z. Tsvetanov (NASA)

If you look at the image on the Hubble site, they give information for how to credit the image, and it isn’t entirely clear on the image page if it is legal to use or not. They do have another page for all their images stating they use Creative Commons licensing requiring attribution.

Hubble: Usage of images, videos and web texts: http://www.spacetelescope.org/copyright/

They actually had a big contest for folk who used or spotted uses of their images in Popular Culture. I won 3rd place for “Weird” with this dress and avatar design, in which the image above (the Cat’s Eye Nebula) became the eyes of the avatar. And this is all perfectly fine and hunky-dory, and I even won copies of some images and videos from them.

Hubble Gown

SEARCHING

There are a TON of places that say they offer a search for images that are creative commons, public domain, or royalty free. Most of them are not actually very safe to use. I’m going to show you several here, with brief comments along the lines of yes, no, maybe so.

CompFight
Creative Commons Search, Yea or Nay
CompFight: http://compfight.com/

MAYBE.
They use the Flickr API to provide an alternate Flickr search experience, powered by ads. Why not just go to Flickr? PS – There are so many other search engines that say they are Creative Commons search engines that are really just using the Flickr API. I am not going to list them all.

Creative Commons
Creative Commons
Creative Commons: Search: http://search.creativecommons.org/

MAYBE.
“Do not assume that the results displayed in this search portal are under a CC license. You should always verify that the work is actually under a CC license by following the link.”

Flickr
Creative Commons Search, Yea or Nay
Flickr: The Commons: http://www.flickr.com/commons

Creative Commons Search, Yea or Nay
Flickr: Creative Commons: http://www.flickr.com/creativecommons/

CAREFUL! YES &/OR MAYBE
When people search creative commons images in Flickr, they often aren’t aware that there are TWO completely different “Commons” in Flickr. When you search or browse “The Commons” you are getting images from schools, libraries, museums, and other famous and authoritative sources. When you search Flickr’s “Creative Commons” search you are trusting whoever put the image there. Not everyone is equally savvy and responsible.

I once had posted a slidedeck that used images from Flickr’s Creative Commons search. I listed the sources of all the images, with link, and then went back to each Flickr page and posted a thank you for making their image CC-licensed, giving the link to where I used it. One of the posters then commented on my comment, saying, “Don’t thank me! I took the image from [insert here name of most famous newspaper you can think of].” Oh. Uh oh. Oh, no.

Google: Image Search
Creative Commons
Google: Advanced Image Search: https://www.google.com/advanced_image_search?hl=en&biw=953&bih=787&q=commons&tbm=isch

Close up:
Creative Commons

SOMETIMES, (BUT MOSTLY NO).
Google Image Search is a case of Good News, Bad News. The Good News is, “Wow, look! They have a way to let you search by license or image rights!” The Bad News is that, of necessity, they trust the information provided on the source page about licensing, and sometimes people steal images, often without realizing they are doing so, and repost them with more freedom than was provided under the original license. That means many, if not most, of the images listed as Creative Commons in Google’s Image Search, well, AREN’T!!

Imagestamper
Cool Toys Pic of the Day - ImageStamper
Imagestamper: http://www.imagestamper.com/

MAYBE. MAYBE NOT.
Not an image search site, but a license management site. Imagestamper offers to manage licensing for you, and keep a record of the license you negotiated at a particularly point in time. The logic is that some images appear to be Creative Commons at one point in time, and then later the owner changes their mind. This really does happen. Ouch. Unfortunately, I’m not sure it’s still alive.

In their words: “The service is in early beta. Currently the service works with images hosted on Flickr, but we will soon add support for images hosted on deviantART and a number of other image-sharing websites. © 2008-2011 ImageStamper.com”

Morgue File
Creative Commons Search, Yea or Nay
Morgue File: http://www.morguefile.com/archive/

NO.
They use a their own home-grown variant of Creative Commons licensing that hasn’t been tested in the courts, and is thus not reliable. Basically, who really knows if these images are safe to use, and how to properly provide attribution?

Noun Project
Cool Toys Pic of the day - Noun Project
Noun Project: http://thenounproject.com/

YES, SOMETIMES
Absolutely fabulous site, but only for images of icons created for and submitted to the site. More info.

Ookaboo
Cool Toys Pic of the day - ookaboo
Ookaboo: http://ookaboo.com/o/pictures/

MAYBE.
Mostly mines Wikimedia Commons for content, under a different interface. Personally, I prefer the original. More info.

SpinXPress
Cool Toys pics of the day: SpinXPress
SpinXPress: http://www.spinxpress.com/getmedia

SOMETIMES.
This is basically a different interface to searching from the Creative Commons portal, with many of the same caveats, and some new ones, too. More Info

Wikimedia Commons
Cool Toys Pic of the Day - Wikimedia Commons (Open Free Pics, Photos and Media)
Wikimedia Commons: http://commons.wikimedia.org/

YES.
But always:
1) click on the image to go to the page for the image information, and
2) scroll to the bottom of the page for each image to check licensing information and use their recommended credit or attribution statement.

Wylio
Cool Toys Pic of the day - WylioCreative Commons Search, Yea or Nay
Cool Toys Pic of the day - WylioCool Toys Pic of the day - Wylio
Wylio: http://www.wylio.com/

MAYBE. MAYBE NOT.
They used to say they’d manage licensing for you, now that’s not clear. They used to just let you search, and now they require you to log in with a Google account. They want you to pay them for the full service, but these are images that are supposed to be free. And on the bottom of the results pages, they feed you to sites that sell images for money. I dunno. Hmmm.

ASSUMPTIONS THAT WORK SOMETIMES, BUT NOT ALWAYS

I can use this because:
– it’s old
– it’s different from the original
– the government made it

BEST PRACTICES

Read the fine print.
Ask for permission if you aren’t sure.
Don’t assume.

MY FAVORITE PLACES FOR FREE IMAGES

1. Wikimedia Commons: http://commons.wikimedia.org

2. Flickr Commons (NOT Flickr Creative Commons): http://www.flickr.com/commons

3. For University of Michigan people, here is more information, LOTS more information!

Research Guides: Images: http://guides.lib.umich.edu/content.php?pid=32604

The Imagine Cup

Day 1 - Imagine Cup 2013 Worldwide Finals

In case you haven’t already heard about it, the Imagine Cup is taking place this week, with a livestream hosted by Microsoft for the final award ceremonies TOMORROW MORNING (i.e. 9:30AM Thursday morning July 11, 2013).

Imagine Cup: http://www.imaginecup.com/

I’m not just excited because Matt Smith, the current Doctor Who, is hosting the awards.


Matt Smith on Imagine Cup 2013: What’s Next?: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k-GQ4h77KVI
Imagine Cup Worldwide Finals with Matt Smith is just the beginning!
http://www.imaginecup.com/main/newsletter#?fbid=F13sydFvnMl

From their About page.
“The Microsoft Imagine Cup is the world’s premier student technology competition. Over the past ten years, more than 1.65 million students from more than 190 countries have participated in the Imagine Cup.”

Last year the awards went to projects like these.

“D Labs allows tutors to understand the behavioral patterns of children with dyslexia by using games to assist them in alphabet identification and movement recognition.”

“Enable Talk was created to give disabled individuals with limited communication abilities a better way to communicate. It transforms sign language into a form of verbal communication by creating a mobile device that continuously recognizes sign language phonemes.”

“WinSenga is a mobile application that aids health workers as they assist expectant mothers. The algorithm analyzes fetal heart sounds to determine the fetal heart rate (beats per minute) and the age and position of the fetus and then records these readings to the cloud”

“Health Buzz is a cost-effective mobile-based solution that helps healthcare service providers access patients’ electronic medical records through a secure cloud-based storage system.”

“StethoCloud is a cloud-powered, mobile-hybrid stethoscope for early detection of pneumonia. By connecting a custom stethoscope to a mobile phone, the user is able to transmit diagnostic information into a cloud service, reproducing the diagnostic capability of a trained medical doctor.”

“nunav is a navigation system with the potential to reduce vehicle carbon emissions by preventing traffic congestion. The system proactively routes city traffic by calculating the best route for each car and communicating that information to each driver.”

Imagine Cup 2012: Imagine Cup Grants Award Winners: http://www.imaginecup.com/IC12/Grants/Winners#?fbid=F13sydFvnMl

Now you see why I’m excited? Incredible tech developments coming from the best and brightest high school students from around the world. Open their doors, open your mind, open the world.

Flickr: Imagine Cup: http://www.flickr.com/photos/imaginecup

TEAMS FROM AROUND THE WORLD

Team Triton, Malaysia Team Omni-Hearing Solution, Taiwan
Team PhAid, Malta Team Qspark, Qatar
Team Kernel, Côte d’Ivoire Team Sano, Canada

PRESENTATIONS

Team Quad Damage presentation
Team vSoft Studio presentation Team Beezinga Presentation
Team MYRA Presentation Team Firebird Presentation
Team Seven Worlds Presentation Team Merado Presentation

ACTIVITIES

Day 1 - Imagine Cup 2013 - Worldwide Finals Day 1 - Imagine Cup 2013 Worldwide Finals
Day 1 - Imagine Cup 2013 - Worldwide Finals Team Combine presentation