Category Archives: Disasters

Ebola and Emerging Technologies

Ebola & Emerging Tech

Ebola & Emerging Tech: http://www.mindmeister.com/485610588/ebola-emerging-tech

Our local Cool Toys Conversations group had asked to have a discussion of emerging technologies and Ebola, and “could we please have it before the holidays when everyone will be traveling?” I had tried to get this up early last week, but life happened, and so it is coming to you now.

When we started looking at this topic I was surprised to find so much! I probably shouldn’t have been — Ebola is big news. It seems as if everyone doing anything in tech and emerging tech is doing something interesting related to Ebola. Well, except Apple. And that surprised me, too. There were so many links, so many topics, I could have EASILY done a month of daily blogposts just on this topic. Once we started, we kept finding more. The collection of links was getting overblown, random, chaotic, confusing. I decided to organize them all in a mindmap, and doing that took a while. Mindmeister kept saying, “Too many topics at one level!” This is why it is broken down into 4 section, but don’t take those sections too seriously. They are more an artifact of the process than seriously meaningful. Each major topic probably has minor topics and links that could easily belong in another section. For that reason, I thought it might be helpful to give an alphabetic list here of what’s included in the mindmap (which is also where you’ll find all the actual links – hint? Click on the little arrows).

I have so many favorite projects and resources I can’t possibly highlight them all. If life and time permit, I’ll try to throw together a slideshow with screenshots of some of them. Just as teasers, here are just a … a smidgen, a teeny tiny sampling. Tim Unwin wrote a great overview of exciting ways in which emerging technologies are being used in the Ebola crisis. Biosensors, wearable tech, open everything, code repositories, data, genetics, DIYbio, mapping and tracking, apps (tons of them), reverse innovation, open source pharma, gaming, cryogenics, … the list goes on and on. You already know how completely enchanted I am with the maker movement right now, and this is no exception. Makers Against Ebola designed flash sensors and proximity alarms to help prevent contamination while working with patients, pull tabs and zipper extenders to make it easier to get in and out of the Personal Protective Environments (which you might recognize better as hazmat suits). The DIY Ebola Challenge came up with a great variety of open source hardware solutions for scientific equipment, in efforts to design a kit they couple bundle and share at point of need. So far they have centrifuges in all sizes, PCR thermocycler, gel electrophoresis, spectrometers, multichannel pipettes, and more. Other folk are using tools like the Raspberry Pi and Beaglebone Black to design inexpensive syringe pumps and diagnostics. And then there’s robots! Robots to decontaminate, robots to intercede between people and create a distance than may contain the disease (like a social firebreak). The ways in which people are using tech to highlight the personal aspect is also awe-inspiring. From citizen journalism to ebola MOOCs to the WAYout Ebola Song, with every social media tool you can name, someone is doing something to try to help share important stories and information. There is a lot more in the mindmap, with links for everything. There’s even a section on open access images about Ebola to use foe teaching, training, and education. Check it out — here’s an outline.

GENERAL

Articles
Collections

PEOPLE DRIVEN

Advocacy
Citizen Science
Citizen Journalism
Collaboration Tech
Communication (Challenges: Misinformation & Hype, Stigma, Weaponized; Solutions: Education & Training, Ebola Information, MOOCs, Information & Health Literacy, Wikipedia
Social Media
Research
Crowdfunding
Crowdsourcing (Challenges)
Makers & DIY
Open (Open Access, Open Images, Open Data, Open Government, Open IBM, Open Source Code Repositories, Open Source Pharma, Open Sources Wearables)
Reverse Innovation

SCIENCE DRIVEN

Arxiv/bioRxiv
Biohacking / DIYbio / SynBio
Data (Data modeling, Data visualization
Open Data
Diagnostics
Genetics
Mapping / Tracking
Nanosilver
NASA

TECH DRIVEN

3D Printing
Apps
Biosensors
Biotech
DARPA
Biocontainment
Cryogenics
Diagnosis
Gaming
Geolocation / Geotagging / GPS
Hackers
IBM
Mobile
Robotics (Asepsis, Telepresence)
Telemedicine
Wearable Tech (Biocontainment, Personal Protective Environments)

Using Twitter to Counteract Hype, Part 2 – Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of August 11, 2014)

CDC Combats Ebola Hype with Twitter Chat August 8, 2014

Last week, I showed you some of the ways in which the healthcare community is using Twitter to combat hype and misinformation about Ebola. This week there is a more specific example of the same idea — how the Centers for Disease Control scheduled a Twitter chat to answer questions in public for clinicians and healthcare providers about the Ebola outbreak in Africa.

There are some surprises in this collection. Some surprising questions, some surprising answers, and sometimes the surprise is in who is doing the answering. The conversation around bleach is especially interesting. Also, notice who is retweeting what the CDC says. This is a small sampling, but many many people passing along the information, and this is important for spreading the word.

THANK YOU, CDC

EXTRAS


First posted the the THL blog: http://thlibrary.wordpress.com/2014/08/11/using-twitter-to-counteract-hype-part-2-hashtags-of-the-week-hotw-week-of-august-11-2014/

Using Twitter to Counteract Hype (#Ebola) – Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of August 4, 2014)

Ebola virionsEbola virus particles
From Wikimedia Commons: Ebola virions; Ebola virus particles

In the last week, I don’t think there has been a moment when the trending hashtags display on my Twitter page has NOT listed “Ebola.” This is in part due to the attention resulting from two American healthcare providers having been infected with the Ebola virus while providing care, and partly also from the newest update from WHO on the outbreak in West Africa, which lists over 1500 cases and almost 900 deaths. People are panicking, and the press is going wild. This is a great opportunity to show how healthcare professionals and the broader healthcare Twitter community is using the #Ebola hashtag to help alleviate concerns and moderate anxiety, by providing informed balanced reliable information. Each of the tweets included in this post is considered a popular tweet which has already been retweeted several times and/or favorited by people reading the tweet. If you want to help calm things down, you might consider retweeting or sharing some of these popular tweets on the topic.

lores Ebola Zaire CDC Photo
From Wikimedia Commons: Ebola case #3, 1976


Reposted from THL Blog: http://thlibrary.wordpress.com/2014/08/04/using-twitter-to-counteract-hype-ebola-hashtags-of-the-week-hotw-week-of-august-4-2014/

Infographic of the Week: Using Social Media as a Crisis Management Tool

Bizarre infographic story

At first I chose this infographic because I loved what it said. I’m a big fan of “SMEM,” a.k.a. “social media emergency management,” so I hoped that putting an infographic about this on my door might get a few folk to read part of it as they went by. Then I did more digging and found it makes a very interesting story.

Last winter, the folks at Emergency Management Degree released an infographic which they had (evidently) hired another company to make. The original infographic is available here:

http://www.emergency-management-degree.org/crisis/

Unfortunately, while it says who came up with the content, does a lovely job of citing original sources, and names the designers, they neglected to include either a copyright statement, a Creative Commons license, or the date it was made. To verify when it was released, it was necessary to look at blogposts that cited it. This was the earliest one I could find.

Infographic: Using Social Media as a Crisis Management Tool, February 11, 2014 http://blog.missionmode.com/blog/infographic-using-social-media-as-a-crisis-management-tool.html

The one I found and printed for my door was, however, not the same one. The original infographic was taken by a firm in India, and remade or “jazzed up.” They preserved all the original content in the same sequence (except for the names of the designers), kept a similar color scheme, and made it look different. Frankly, the original one is better designed and the remade one uses a lot of clip art. I don’t know if they were asked to do this for the blog on which I found the redesigned one or if it was their own idea and the blog simply stumbled on it. In any case, everyone links back to the folk who came up with the original content, so it is only the design that changed. Well, and the company from India that remade it added a few typos, probably because English is a second language for them? Here is where I found the redesign a couple weeks ago.

Social Media Makes a Powerful Crisis Management Tool: Infographic shows just how vital a firm grasp of social media is for crisis management / By Jonathan & Erik Bernstein on May 9, 2014 http://managementhelp.org/blogs/crisis-management/2014/05/09/social-media-makes-a-powerful-crisis-management-tool/

And that explains why I have an infographic with typos on my door. You probably want the original, so here it is!

Using Social Media as a Crisis Management Tool
Image source: www.emergency-management-degree.org

Preparedness — Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of April 7, 2014)

SL - Wolverine: UMMS Elective, Play2Train

It seems like now every week has so many incredible conversations going on that it is hard to choose a topic for these weekly posts. This week I was saved by the synchronicity of two separate tags with similar themes. The annual Preparedness Summit conference was going on (#PS14), and then the weekly medical librarians chat (#medlibs) also focused on disaster preparedness. So, there you go, that’s today’s topic!

The Preparedness Summit focused on the profession, trends, new research, etc. The medical librarians chat, to my surprise, focused less on libraries and more on practical personal sharing of what’s most important to remember for personal safety in various types of disaster scenarios. Both were useful and information. Here are highlights from both hashtags. There are even overlapping tweets, with both hashtags!


First posted at THL Blog: http://thlibrary.wordpress.com/2014/04/07/preparedness-hashtags-of-the-week-hotw-week-of-april-7-2014/

New Presentations on Social Media in Disasters, Crises, Emergencies

My blog has been laying fallow while I work on recovering from an injury to my dominant arm, but, as progress is being made with healing, I want to try to start getting back into the blogging habit, starting with some simple posts. Today I stumbled onto some excellent slide presentations on use of social media in disasters of various sorts, a topic for which I have great passion and which is highly relevant to health professionals, especially those working in public health.

Two of the presentations I want to highlight are both by folk who are excellent resources on this topic, but people just don’t know about them as much as I think is deserved. They are Anahi Iacucci, Senior Innovation Advisor at Internews Network, and Jim Garrow, Operations and Logistics Manager at Philadelphia Department of Public Health. The other is by the phenomenal Eric K. Noji, who spoke here at UM some years ago, and has published widely on this topic. He is my number one go-to guy for information about information needs during different types of disasters. You might not know he’s on Slideshare, though, because he isn’t there under his own name, but as “Center for Polar Medical Operations, US Antarctic Program.”

ERIC K. NOJI / WALTER HAYS

Starting with the last, Dr. Noji posted a new presentation a few days ago on how to foster disaster resilience around the entire world, courtesy of Dr. Walter Hays. I would LOVE to see libraries use the structure of knowledge presented here to strategically plan information collections designed explicitly for disaster preparation for their own local community.


Three steps towards global disaster resilience in 2014: http://www.slideshare.net/enoji/three-steps-towards-global-disaster-resilience-in-2014
“Continuation of a renewed emphasis on promoting our 2014 paradigm of global disaster resilience.
Step 1: Integrating Today’s Global Knowledge Into Global Books of Knowledge
Step 2: From Today’s Books of Knowledge to Innovative Capacity Building
Step 3: From Today’s Paradigm to Tomorrow’s
Presentation courtesy of Dr. Walter Hays, Global Alliance for Disaster Reduction”

You might also find interesting his earlier paper on “Emergent Use of Social Media” upload of the “Bill Gates Favorite Info Graphic for 2013: Causes of Untimely Death.”

ANAHI IACUCCI

Anahi Iacucci evidently decided to do some late year housekeeping, and uploaded a boatload of great slide presentations all on December 15th. I’m being selective and only pointing out a few that I think are particularly important, as well as recent.

In this first selection, Ms. Iacucci expresses the important issue of how open data and open access can have unexpected and important impacts in a time of crisis.

“While a growing conversation is happening around Open Data as a driver for development and accountability, little, if any, is being said about the role of open data in humanitarian emergencies. While we ask governments to open all their data as a duty towards their citizens, humanitarian organizations seems to be pretty much left outside. Is there a need for open data in the humanitarian community space? What would it look like? Are transparency and accountability strictly linked to the healthy recovery of communities in emergencies?”


Humanitarian emergencies: searching for Open Data http://www.slideshare.net/AnahiAyala/ok-conf-un

The next selection focuses on what you can DO with the right information! How can access to necessary information promote trust, and how does that information move from person to person to get to the point of need? The main foci of the talk is on: Information flows, trust, influence, technology & new media.


Preventing Conflict with the right information – UNDP Workshop http://www.slideshare.net/AnahiAyala/undp-ict-and-conflict-prevention

Last but not least of this group is a piece she does on the power of social media and crowdsourcing for information dissemination, gathering, and management during crisis.

“The overall objective of this workshop was to increase the effectiveness of internal communications among public health stakeholders and external communications with the general public before, during, and after public health emergencies.”


Social Media for Public Health during Emergencies http://www.slideshare.net/AnahiAyala/social-media-for-public-health-during-emergencies

There are several other goodies in her collection, worth exploring.

JIM GARROW

Following along that theme, the first piece from Jim Garrow’s collection is his excellent keynote from the National Association of Government Webmasters 2013.


Saving Lives 2.0: How Social Media will Change Disasters and Response http://www.slideshare.net/jgarrow/saving-lives-20-how-social-media-will-change-disas

Next, his clever and witty presentation earlier this year at the 2013 Northeast Texas Public Health Association Emergency Preparedness Bridging the Gaps Conference.


The Role of Social Media in Disasters http://www.slideshare.net/jgarrow/garrow-social-mediaanddisasters

Lastly, his November collection of examples and stories. I wish I could have heard this, or that audio was available to go with it! Still, and excellent resource for those looking for persuasive examples to use in conversation with their own communities.


Social Media in Disasters: reports from the field http://www.slideshare.net/jgarrow/garrow-socialmedia

EXTRAS

Here’s a bonus. This isn’t a terribly well done slide presentation, but it has interesting information which I seriously hope will be better presented somewhere else. This is giving survey data results from an American Red Cross survey done in 2012, and which was evidently posted in Slideshare by someone unconnected with the project. I was able to locate the original slides here. The particular part that captured my attention most was on slide 8:

“8% of the general public, 14% of 18-34 year olds, and 10% of the online population have downloaded a smartphone app that could help in a disaster or emergency
have downloaded an app that could help in a disaster or emergency.”

“Most Popular Emergency Apps
1. Weather Forecasting App 82%
2. Flashlight App 52%
3. First Aid App 31%
4. Police Scanner App 26%
5. Disaster Preparedness App 19% “

Social media in disasters and emergencies (survey red cross) http://www.slideshare.net/socialmediadna/social-media-in-disasters-and-emergencies-survey-red-cross

And another fascinating piece (the excellent NASEO report on how social media was used in Hurricane Sandy) which someone else loaded to slideshare after they found it elsewhere online.


June 2013, Lessons Learned: Social Media and Hurricane Sandy (Virtual Social Media Working Group and DHS First Responders Group) http://www.naseo.org/Data/Sites/1/documents/committees/energysecurity/documents/dhs_vsmwg_lessons_learned_social_media_and_hurricane_sandy_formatted_june_2013_final.pdf

You Can Help! Crowdsourcing Disaster Planning & Response Resources for #SMEM

Translate-a-Bowl

I can’t tell you how EXCITED I am about this project! Disaster and crisis response planning is one of my, well, hobby isn’t the right word, so let’s say special areas of interest. I like languages, and I love accessibility. I love advocacy and doing-good-for-others projects and activities. You all know how engaged I am with social media. I go giddy over citizen science and crowdsourcing and collaboration technologies. Then, riding the bus to work a couple days ago, I was chatting with Dave Malicke from Open Michigan, and he mentioned they are (wait for it):
CROWDSOURCING
TRANSLATION
of a video series in YOUTUBE
developed as part of a global health COLLABORATION
on DISASTER management and response and EMERGENCY planning!!

Open Michigan: Emergency Planning Lecture Videos -HEALTH Alliance: Captions

Now, really, how could I not be excited?

Even better, they are kicking off with a grand event combining both a real life and virtual meet-up (with FOOD for the face-to-face part). They are calling this the Translate-a-Bowl, and it starts today and runs through the weekend. But don’t stop if you are busy all of Superbowl weekend, because the need for translators and proofing will continue until it is all done!

I am remembering when the tsunami hit Japan, and people had found emergency hospital evacuation procedures, and needed them urgently translated RUSH into Japanese. These videos were developed for East Africa in collaboration with a group of African and American universities. It is really an impressive collaboration. If you can’t help, the project is still fascinating, especially for how it is organization and developed. If you know English and any other language, take a further look.

“Our priority languages are French, Portuguese (Brazil), Spanish, and Swahili, but we encourage all languages. (We have computer-generated translations in those 4, plus 31 others.)”

About the project:
Help us translate educational videos about microbiology and disaster management from Michigan, Ghana, and East Africa: https://open.umich.edu/blog/2013/01/28/help-us-translate-health-oer-videos/

Register for the Bowl:

Translate-A-Bowl:
https://sites.google.com/a/umich.edu/translate-a-bowl-mmxiii/

Here is the playlist of the disaster management videos:


Emergency Planning Lecture Videos -HEALTH Alliance: Captions: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLJhG_d-Sp_JFQsyGwLFjr6ojSqWbhVTaU

Remember, they are also doing other topics, like microbiology, it is just that I am so excited about the disaster videos.