Category Archives: Science2.0/Health2.0

Hashtags of the World (HOTW): #WhatIfResearchKit / What If Research Kit … ?

Apple ResearchKit
Apple ResearchKit: https://www.apple.com/researchkit/
ResearchKit for Developers: https://developer.apple.com/researchkit/

Last week, while I was deep in the throes of a family crisis, Apple announced “ResearchKit.” I noticed it, but obviously had no time to do anything with it. I’m looking forward to exploring that. I mean, really, it’s getting a ton of press!

9to5Mac: ResearchKit did in 24 hours what would normally take 50 medical centers a year – Stanford University

Bloomberg Business: Thousands Have Already Signed Up for Apple’s ResearchKit

CNBC: Apple’s ResearchKit: Gamechanger for digital health care?

Forbes: Apple’s Open-Source ‘ResearchKit’ And The Future Of Medical Research

MacWorld: First medical apps built with Apple’s ResearchKit won’t share data for commercial gain

MacWorld: Stanford’s ResearchKit app gained more users in 24 hours than most medical studies find in a year

TechCrunch: ResearchKit An “Enormous Opportunity” For Science, Says Breast Cancer Charity

TedBlog: mPowering the Apple ResearchKit: How Max Little put a Parkinson’s app on the iPhone

TheVerge: Apple’s new ResearchKit: ‘Ethics quagmire’ or medical research aid?

TheVerge: Apple’s new ResearchKit lets iPhone users participate in clinical trials; It could help researchers recruit from more diverse populations

Wired: Apple’s ResearchKit is a New Way to do Medical Research

Here is what Apple and it’s current group of partners are envisioning for how ResearchKit might be used. It sounds pretty inspiring already, with a nod to some of the complicated ethical and privacy issues poised to emerge.


ResearchKit – how iPhone is transforming medical research https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VyY2qPb6c0c

In the meantime, several of my friends and colleagues on Twitter have begun discussion their visions for what could be done with ResearchKit. This group includes patients as well as researchers, and this, I suspect is the demographic, the community creating collaborations where the most profound and productive changes will be found. Here’s what they are saying, so far. Why don’t you join in?

Why stop there? What other possibilities could come from widespread adoption and use of ResearchKit?

#WhatIfResearchKit helped monitor the progression of Alzheimer’s Disease. Like a more official version of what was seen in ‘Still Alice’?

#WhatIfResearchKit helped improve treatment and intervention for depression through passive activity tracking?

#WhatIfResearchKit apps were developed in collaboration with the patient community? If these apps aren’t used, there’s no data to analyze.

What if Apple released a tool so anyone could make a #ResearchKit connected app. True citizen science. #WhatIfResearchKit

What if a community of translator helped translate #ResearchKit studies and consent information into other languages. #WhatIfResearchKit

#WhatIfResearchKit was rolled into the #PrecisionMedicine initiative and the NIH took a more open-source mentality to data collection.

That #WhatIfResearchKit already exists recalls @rufuspollock: “The best thing to do with your #data will be thought of by someone else.”

#WhatIfResearchKit tracked child development so that children with autism could be diagnosed quicker and provided with skills

Catching up on two rich threads: #bcsm + #WhatifResearchKit Who says we can’t cry and laugh and hope and rage all at the same time?

#WhatIfResearchKit was a cross-platform non-profit initiative partnering together device manufacturers to better healthcare? #DigitalHealth

“The key to understanding #health & disease is research & data.” Check out @AppIeOfflciaI’s #WhatIfResearchKit: http://apple.co/1FFSLR8

#WhatIfResearchKit JMIR will built a Healthbook app which randomizes participants to #mhealth apps #megatrial with 700 million participants

Healthbook http://www.healthbook.com/ will use #researchkit and also support n-of-1 trials to evaluate #mhealth apps #WhatIfResearchKit

What if all the people who are “healthy” (for now) could contribute their data as controls? #WhatIfResearchKit

#WhatIfResearchKit had an opt-in for every human, to proxy any slice of my data to #opensource science. +audit-trail

#WhatIfResearchKit was my life baseline, always collecting data when I’m healthy, so when I’m sick, the record is computable + comparable.

#WhatIfResearchKit was available on android platforms to ensure more socioeconomic, racial and ethnic diversity of participants

#WhatIfResearchKit flipped the paradigm community based studies studying access to care, how tertiary care centers impact POC communities

What if Apple made a dashboard so that we could all see enrollment numbers for #ResearchKit apps (in real time)? #WhatIfResearchKit

Reporters: If you are writing about #ResearchKit check out the ideas being shared here: #WhatIfResearchKit (and interview those innovators)

#WhatIfResearchKit – A story in 140 character bursts of hope https://storify.com/iamspartacus/whatifresearchkit … via @iam_spartacus

Big Beautiful Questions (A HOTW post from #hcldr)

Guy with questions 8

The other blog for which I was writing the “Hashtag of the Week (HOTW)” posts has changed focus, so I am no longer doing them weekly, but I am still doing them when available time and something amazing both intersect. The something amazing part happens ALL THE TIME, and if that was the only factor, I could do these daily! But this time, the conversation was so relevant and useful that I would feel like I wasn’t doing my job if I didn’t share it.

Yesterday evening, the Healthcare Leadership group had a conversation about the role of questions and questioning in healthcare. The conversation was lead by Bernadette Keefe, MD, and was triggered by Warren Berger’s work in the area of “beautiful questions.” He wrote a book, but you can find a short intro to the core ideas in his New Year’s article, “Forget Resolutions.” To help people ask better questions, more answerable questions, questions that have a higher potential for leading to positive change in their life, Bernadette pointed out the tips from the “Right Question Institute“, and I pointed out the “Question Prompts List” strategy.

Right Question Institute Question Prompt Lists

The real value of the #hcldr conversation, however, came from the questions. The questions posed for the group, and the questions posted as answers. My favorite of the questions posed was, “What are we not asking?” Keep that in mind as you read the following selections from the questions given as answers to the prompts.


T1 In our sizable efforts to make healthcare more efficient, accurate and safe,as well as less costly, what are the questions weʼre not asking?


T2 As you experience healthcare delivery today – is questioning valued?


T3 What are questions you, personally, would like to ask of your healthcare provider, medical insurance company, or hospital?


T4 How could the value of questioning be incorporated into healthcare delivery in an efficient and effective way? Programs etc?


Closing Thoughts

At the Movies: Male Rape, 10 (or so) Heartbreaking #BreakTheSilence Videos (TRIGGER WARNING)

Male Rape Word Clouds

A couple months ago I posted about Mike Tyson’s revelation of having been sexually assaulted as a very young boy, and some related information about male rape and how little is said about it. I didn’t want that to be a one-off, something that is brought up once and then dropped. Social media is becoming a huge tool in creating conversations and safe spaces around difficult topics that have traditionally been avoided. This is one of the most powerful ways in which social media is being applied to changing the world we live in, and it is amazing to observe this ‘unmentionable’ topic (male rape) unfolding through social and popular media.

Several recent events have brought the topic back to mind, rapes, and male rape, and other things we don’t talk about. One was the recent Rolling Stone article about a gang rape at the University of Virginia, and the backlash against it, with implications that the story was improperly researched. Another was the earlier protests on my own campus, here at the University of Michigan, which resulted in official responses from campus leadership.

The UMich protests were at least partly in support of Emma Sulcowicz, the Mattress Performance, and the #CarryThatWeight campaign inspired by the Mattress Performance.

And then, there is the story that broke recently on Twitter, of male artist Shia LeBeouf being raped in his gallery during an interactive audience participation performance art piece. This was confirmed by collaborators at the show, and has opened even more conversations about what it means for a man to be raped.

A couple weeks ago I stumbled onto some information about a new public health initiative in the United Kingdom trying to bring awareness to this topic. They are using the hashtag #BreakTheSilence, a tag which is used by many advocacy groups, so it is a little confusing, however well intended it might be. The UK government is using so many different social media platforms to get out this message — Facebook, Twitter, Youtube, Flickr, Instagram, Pinterest, Tumblr, and more. I could conjecture why the UK is being more open about male rape than the USA, but that’s irrelevant for this post. The fact is that they are. There is the government initiative, active support groups, multiple television shows that have had episodes on the topic, with the recent inclusion of a male rape plot theme and storyline in the daily soap Hollyoaks, which extended throughout an entire season of the show.

In the United States, male rape is still not talked about except rarely and in sensational ways. Even then, it is pretty uncomfortable and the stories tend to die down quickly in the media. Research studies show, however, that this is far from uncommon, and that the repression of the stories and lack of available ways to talk about make recovery far more difficult for male victims of rape.

We concluded that federal surveys detect a high prevalence of sexual victimization among men—in many circumstances similar to the prevalence found among women. We identified factors that perpetuate misperceptions about men’s sexual victimization: reliance on traditional gender stereotypes, outdated and inconsistent definitions, and methodological sampling biases that exclude inmates. We recommend changes that move beyond regressive gender assumptions, which can harm both women and men. Lara Stemple and Ilan H. Meyer. The Sexual Victimization of Men in America: New Data Challenge Old Assumptions. American Journal of Public Health: June 2014, 104(6):e19-e26. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2014.301946

But the same conversation needs to happen for men. By portraying sexual violence against men as aberrant, we prevent justice and compound the shame. And the conversation about men doesn’t need to shut down the one about women. “Compassion,” [Stemple] says, “is not a finite resource.” Rosin, Hannah. When Men Are Raped. Slate April 29, 2014.

So, this is a tough topic, even if it needs to be talked about in public. We’re going to ease into this gently, slowly. I’ll give you a bit of info about each video, and you decide if you can watch it. Give them a try, though, and try to understand.


(1) #BreaktheSilence around male rape

This is the introductory video to the UK government’s Breath the Silence initiative on male rape. The video unfolds through interviews with an actor who portrays a male rape survivor and someone who represents one of the UK support organizations for male rape survivors. It is fairly light on triggers, and intended to get the conversation going.


“Evidence suggests that 12% of all rape victims are men. Yet we know it is common for men not to come forward or to take years to report being a victim because they fear not being believed, feel alone and worry people will blame them for what’s happened.”

The same video is also available from Survivors Manchester.


(2) Hollyoaks

In the BreakTheSilence video, the actor was from the UK-based television show Hollyoaks. Hollyoaks spent over a year in research, preparing to integrate homophobic bullying and male rape into the show’s storyline. They collaborated with male rape survivor advocacy organizations in planning and writing the script, and the actors worked with them to try to make the story believable. While male rape has appeared in popular media before, it was usually included primarily for shock value and to emphasize brutality. This is the first time I’m aware of that presented the topic as a realistic real-world event, something that happens (even if off camera), and which also shows the recovery, support system, and works through the healing process. In this video, it is an interview with the actors, interspersed with a view extremely brief snippets from the show’s footage, closing with the importance of the conversation being taken up by fans in social media as part of making this something that can be talked about.

A couple other relatively mild videos with excerpts related to the Hollyoaks rape story. (If you want the full episode, dig around in Youtube, and you’ll probably find it, depending on what country you live in.)

Finn O’Connor/John Paul McQueen | Rape Reveal: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Zt6SrSNRl4
Hollyoaks Ste Works Out Finn Raped John Paul: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KsaK5MATfrw
Hollyoaks – {John Paul’s traumatic ordeal tribute} https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gxjlUKrwDj0


(3) The Bill: “Mickey’s Side Of The Story” (Subject of Male Rape)

Presented as a music video, snippets are included from Episode 153 of another UK show, The Bill, themed around police stories. In this episode, a man suffers flashbacks to childhood sexual abuse from a coach.


(4) Why Rape Is Sincerely Hilarious

Whoa, whoa, take a minute and calm down. Yes, the title sounds inflammatory and insensitive. It isn’t. This video opens to a black screen and a young man, saying, “Hi, my name is Will, and I sincerely think that rape is hilarious.” He seems happy, quirky, smiling, laughing. The screen never changes, and the young man stays on screen straight through the very short video. The video closes with the same young man, still smiling, still laughing, but flushed, red, clenching his jaw as he forces himself to keep smiling, and with tears in his eyes, saying, “And that’s why I sincerely think that rape is hilarious. Because I have to.” His story is worth listening to.


(5) The Shia Labeouf Thing and Male Rape

This is a sweet video. A cute young woman in a darling dress and with excellent makeup was filmed sitting by her Christmas tree. It’s all rather lovely. But what she says is what’s important. She talks through a script with research and statistics. She puts the whole script in the video comments with live links to the excellent resources she identified (which is the real reason I selected her video). She correctly calls out people who are trying to shame Shia LeBeouf as setting a bad example for other victims of male rape. It’s not the world’s best video, but she’s right.


(6) No Escape: Prison Rape in America – The Rules of the Game: Prison Rape and Reform

Prison rape is a serious issue, and often overlooked in statistics and studies of male rape. This video tells the sad story of an innocent sent to prison for a minor crime, being raped, terrified, victimized, and then using his own experience to try to change the system to protect others. I love the comment towards the end to the effect that until you can guarantee safety and the opportunity to improve self-esteem, it is really hard to change people for the better.


(7) Male Rape

An educational video from the Service Assisting Male Survivors of Sexual Assault (Australia). This video is relatively non-triggering, as an audio interview of a woman, Rachel, from a support organization for men who’ve been raped by other men. The discussion includes how to tell if your son may have been raped, how pedophiles groom entire families to gain access to one child, that adult men can be rape victims, the role of sexual violence against men as an act of war, adult recovery from childhood victimization, and much more. Highly informational, almost no images.


(8) Heath’s Story of Surviving Military Sexual Assault

Recent years have seen a dramatic increase in the incidence and reporting of what is becoming known as military rape, mostly against women. It does happen to men, also, although people have sometimes trouble believing it. Protect Our Defenders is an organization that has as its mission to help deal with the issue of military rape. This video allows a Navy veteran to tell the story of his victimization and bullying, and how he ended up accepting a dishonorable discharge to escape.


(9) Shatterboy: Men Surviving Sexual Abuse

“The odd thing about it, though, is children are made aware of rape, male on female rape, all of their lives. They never hear about female or male on male.”

Intended as a resource for therapy groups, this video includes conversations with five male survivors of sexual abuse. It illustrates some of the range of what can happen, the vulnerabilities of men and boys. It talks more coherently about the longterm psychological impacts these events can have on a person.


(10) The Congo

In the war and violence going on in the Congo, rape has become a common tactic to control and demoralize people, to keep them from fighting back. The statistics reported in this video state that approximately 40% of all women and 24% of all men have suffered sexual trauma and/or violence. The stories coming from this area are exceptionally brutal. In the highlighted video, there is a brief interview with a survivor and a longer interview with a doctor about the need for support and treatment for male victims of sexual violence.

Congo’s male rape victims speak out https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OGz3VkcLgkk

Fair Use & Figures: When Is It OK? (Part One: Copyright)

Last week I spent some time in conversations that began with Andrew Maynard’s posting a question to Twitter: “When is it OK to post a figure from a paper in a blog post?”

There were a lot of interesting thoughts and responses (before the conversation detoured off into mac’n’cheese and samurai swords). Things along the lines of, “What!? You mean research figures are different from pictures?” and “Isn’t it OK if you give a citation?” and “Well, my journal won’t allow it, but maybe some others do.” And what did the answer turn out to be? “It depends.” Isn’t that the truth – intellectual property issues always seems to depend on a variety of factors and situations. But answers to the various responses and questions were also sometimes not what was expected.

Does giving a citation to the source make it ok to share? Turns out it is irrelevant, in the sense of what is required legally, although it is expected as part of being active in scholarly culture as a matter of courtesy.

Now, more about posting research figures in blogs. I found quite a lot of information online to help explain part of how this works (or doesn’t). I’ll include small quotations that I found particularly helpful in understanding this better. Please not, IANAL (“I Am Not A Lawyer”!), so hopefully someone with more legal experience will contribute thoughts in the comments or will reply in another post.

“REUSE OF FIGURES, IMAGES, AND OTHER CONTENT”

The absolutely most helpful piece I found was from MIT Libraries.

MIT Libraries, Scholarly Publishing: Reuse of figures, images, and other content in theses http://libraries.mit.edu/scholarly/publishing/copyright-publishing-guide-for-students/reuse-of-figures-images-and-other-content-in-theses/

Please note, this is describing rights to re-use content in THESES, not blogposts, so it might be a little different. The MIT resource emphasized two main points (copyright, and fair use), with a pointed twist (oops, figures ARE different!).

Point 1: Is it copyrighted?

You see, if it isn’t copyrighted, if an image is in the public domain, you don’t have a problem — it is content you can use. That is more likely to apply to items that are quite old, or created by government employees in the performance of their job. But copyright gets complicated. What if the journal is from Australia instead of the United States? Whether or not a piece is copyrighted may change based on the country in which it was created.

Even if it is copyrighted, if it is licensed for open use, you are fine. Probably. OK, I’m going to show an image here that ought to be OK, and hope it really is. This stuff is tricky. If someone complains, I’ll blur out whatever part they are concerned about.

PubMed Example of Research Figure Searching & Display (Neuroinflammation Imaging) PubMed screenshot of:
Benjamin Pulli and John W Chen. Imaging Neuroinflammation – from Bench to Bedside. J Clin Cell Immunol. Author manuscript; available in PMC Dec 16, 2014. Published in final edited form as: J Clin Cell Immunol. 2014; 5: 226. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25525560

This is a screenshot from PubMed. PubMed is an open database developed and created by the US government. I had talked with our lawyers about using screenshots from databases in teaching and blogging about database interfaces. I was told (off the record) that it was probably OK to use the screenshots without asking for permissions as part of fair use. The idea was that even if the database legally has copyright protection for their user interface design (as they most assuredly do), that I am teaching and blogging about it is unlikely to impact on their sales negatively, which is one of the markers of “Fair Use” assessment. Chances are, if anything, my teaching and blogging about their database would serve as free advertising, increasing awareness and profits rather than reducing them. That assumes, of course, that I am saying good things about them. So, maybe it would be a different matter and not fair use if I was criticizing the database?

PubMed does this nifty thing where you can find images of research figures in the citations, if the original source is an article in PubMed Central, an extension of PubMed’s database that includes open access articles deposited by the publishers. (More info here about how they are different.) For the images displayed as thumbnails in PubMed, if you mouse over them, they get big and beautiful. This is what I’m showing in this screenshot.

This screenshot is of a citation record for an article that is open access and published in PubMed Central. Does the copyright permissions for screenshots in PubMed extend to the content? That this article is open access would mean that the article is copyrighted, but open for people who want to read it, and also available to re-use under specific guidelines. The guidelines given for the article are, “This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.” By the rules, I need to include a full citation with the image. I have done so, both in Flickr, where I put the screenshot, and here in the blogpost. BUT.

PubMed Example of Research Figure Searching & Display (Neuroinflammation Imaging) 2

BUT. But what? But this figure from the open access research article says that a portion of the image was modified from another source, WITH PERMISSION. Does that permission extend to me, since it was in an open access journal? I’m not sure. I’m not sure if I need to get two sets of permission to use this image, or none. Do I need to go back to the original authors of that portion and request permission myself? Do I need to blur out that portion of the image? Or did the process of these authors getting permission to use in an open access journal publication cover subsequent re-use? Do I need to check the policies for the journal where the source image was published? It’s … complicated.

For me, today, I’m electing to go ahead and use the image, trusting and hoping that the permissions cover this use. If someone complains, I will go back and blur out that portion of the image, and then replace it.

Many publishers have processes by which they establish policies that guide whether or not they give permission easily or if you have to jump through hoops or purchase permission. If you want to find out what the policies are for a journal with a figure you’d like to use, the place to check is SHERPA. If you want to know if a journal is open access, the you may want to check the DOAJ (Directory of Open Access Journals).

SHERPA/RoMEO – Publisher copyright policies & self-archiving http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/

DOAJ: http://doaj.org/


Part Two will look more deeply at the idea of Fair Use in using research figures. That’s where it gets really interesting, so stay tuned! For now, I hope you have a better sense of the two-pronged sword of copyright in using research figures:

– Yes, it’s OK to use research figures that are copyright-free, public domain, or open access;
– BUT, sometimes those categories are less than straightforward.

At the Movies: Sex Positivity Messages on Youtube

Montage of thumbnails for several Youtube channels focused on sex positive messages

Tonight there is a #medlibs Twitter chat on some ways in which sex education is happening on social media.

Sexual Education & Social Media Chat — Sex Ed On Social Media: Quirky or Quality? http://medlibschat.blogspot.com/2015/01/sexual-education-social-media-chat.html

In preparation for this, I’d like to share highlights from a few of the more popular “sex positive” sex education Youtube channels! “Sex +,” “sex positive,” and “sex positivity” is a whole movement focused on looking at sex and sexual behavior as a good healthy thing rather than “dirty”. I’m probably oversimplifying with that rough definition, but it gives the broad idea. Many of the advocates and information channels include education, but some focus instead on relationships, communication, psychology, and attitudes. Some are professionally made, some are from health care or educational professionals, some are homegrown. You can’t tell which are the good ones from the source. Some professional ones are badly made or slanted, some homegrown ones are excellent and accurate.

As the phrases “sex positive” and “sex positivity” become more popular, you also begin to find some pornography channels that adopt the phrase in order to get into the search results. This has also happened with “sex ed” and “sexual education,” where some of the channels are more focused on education, and others are more focused on the (ahem) sex. This makes it really hard to go out, do a search, and actually FIND good quality sex ed content in Youtube. You can’t know before clicking if you’ll find something educational or something more smutty or something simply stuffy.

These channels often have clever names to communicate their focus topic (Ask My Girlfriend, Cherry TV, GLAMerotica 101, Kara Sutra, Nice Girls Like Sex Too, Sexplanations, Twisted Broad). Some of them provide good information in a cute way, others have cute names but rarely post any information, and yet others aren’t actually on the topic they seem to be on. Even if they post information rarely, it might be good, or it might be dated or irrelevant. Even if they have lots of views, it might be because it’s a good video or it might just be, well, porn. Again, you don’t know until you go look.

So, you can’t trust the key words, the metadata, the sponsors, the names of the channels, or the names of the videos. This is one of the best reasons for medical librarians and health care professionals to look into this before the questions are asked or answered. Trust me, you REALLY don’t want to be browsing these while someone is looking over your shoulder waiting for an answer! I stumbled into a few surprises while planning this post that I really could have done without. (The eyeballs! They burn! Ahhhh!) So spare your eyeballs, and check out a few of these as examples of the sex+ genre.

In this collection (which is highly selected and ONLY examples!), I’m focusing specifically on pieces with a more education focus and less of the sex, how to, issues, or relationship management, even though those are also obviously important. This means I didn’t include the famous Dan Savage or Kara Sutra or Just Sex or Nice Girls Like Sex Too or Twisted Broad or …. I also wanted to show sex ed that is more peer-to-peer, from teens and young adults to other teens and young adults, so I didn’t include pieces that try to sell sex toys or psychotherapy or couples therapy or from major universities. Face it, the universities offer solid content, but it isn’t as fun and engaging. Should it be? Why or why not? Did I miss any channels you think are great? Please list them in the comments!


LACI GREEN

Of course, I have to begin (and end!) with Laci Green, who is THE name in this space. If you only have heard of one sex positive online advocate, it is probably her. This video on the topic of what is consent and how to get it goes into an essential concept in sexual safety, as well as prevention of rape and sexual violence. Her description of the video includes “how to properly ask for consent, as well as what consent does and does not sound like.” Good stuff, worth thinking about. What would you add or change?

Wanna have sex? (Consent 101) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TD2EooMhqRI


LACI GREEN: A NAKED NOTION

Laci Green started up a second channel in partnership with Planned Parenthood for talk about sex topics that are less educational and more issue-oriented. In this space, she has a small collection of videos on topics such as recovering from rape, hormone therapy, birth control, pregnancy testing, and more.

Sex After Rape https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CRnK6xN7PF4


LACI GREEN: MTV BRALESS

Laci Green started up a THIRD channel in partnership with MTV for talk about pop culture, some of which includes sex talk and much of which doesn’t. In this space, she has a small collection of videos on topics such as recovering from rape, hormone therapy, birth control, pregnancy testing, and more.

Sex At Hogwarts?! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MXPQBLOfnFk


SEXPLANATIONS

Sexplanations is a channel designed around the perception of authority (“with Dr. Doc”) right along with quirkiness (check out the pigtailed avatar). The “Dr. Doc” behind the show is Lindsey Doe, a clinical sexologist.

Sexplanations Episodes 1-50: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pQiadPyjJ4E&list=PL_zdi3TflN9LjEjkqh3OwKb-l8o-ieODH&index=1


REID ABOUT SEX

Reid About Sex is a partnership of Reid Mihalko and Cathy Vartuli (Intimacy Dojo). In their extensive video series they have conversations about topics of interest, ranging from gender identity and sexually transmitted diseases to communication, props, behavior, and sex positive business advise. Whoa. That’s a lot of ground to cover.

Can You Get Herpes From Cuddling? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hcXzaKJsaJc


TheTitTalk: THE SEX ED TALK

The Sex Ed Talk used to be called “The Tit Talk”, and can be found in various social media locations under either or both names. Their focus is on what they believe should have been covered in school, but wasn’t, or wasn’t covered as thoroughly as they like.

Vagina 101 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cE93vWFglEg


BETTY DODSON & CARLIN ROSS

Dodson & Ross introduce themselves as “the top sex educator in the world” and “the best attorney on the planet and my stunt c**t.” They continue by claiming you can’t ask a good question they won’t answer. They mean it, too. I had trouble finding one that was safe to put in this post. Despite the use of straight language (which sometimes means street language), all the videos are education, and pretty straightforward as well as candid.

Healthy Vaginas Through Menopause https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_RTjYaBrYMo


LACI GREEN: THE FAMOUS CHERRY VIDEO

I just couldn’t do this post without included my first and favorite Laci Green video — “You Can’t Pop Your Cherry (Hymen 101).”

You Can’t POP Your Cherry! (Hymen 101) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9qFojO8WkpA

Aligning Forces for Quality (#AF4Q #hcvalue) – Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of December 15, 2014)

I came back from the Aligning Forces for Quality (#AF4Q) conference last month, all excited and wanting to assemble this post right away. Now, weeks later, and life happened but the blogpost didn’t, to my disappointment. Hopefully the wait will turn out to be worth it, as I’ve been mentally percolating what I heard and learned while there. Here’s my plan. First, begin with highlights from the Twitter stream. Next, choose a few of the Youtube videos from the event to highlight or react to particular concepts. Then, if I have time (which is unlikely), I’d like to do a recap / overview piece. What is more likely to happen is that ideas and concepts and strategies I heard at AF4Q will continue to inform other work I do, and will be shared in those contexts as they arise.

What is Aligning Forces for Quality? When I was invited to attend, that was my second question. The first question was, “Is this legit?” I had somehow not heard about AF4Q previously, and so I wondered who are these people, why are they inviting me, and what is this about? The AF4Q project turns out to be one of the many healthcare projects funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. That answers the question of legitimacy rather nicely, I thought! This particular project has been a several year initiative to explicitly attempt to revolutionize the practice of healthcare through inclusion of and engagement with patients.

Really? I mean, we talk about this ALL THE TIME in the many healthcare Twitter chats, the Mayo Clinic Center for Social Media, the Make Health movement, various local initiatives at UMHS…. I mean, REALLY??? How has this been going on for years, and me watching for patient engagement topics, and still I didn’t know about it? It turns out, that was part of why I was invited. They are doing this extremely interesting work, but it isn’t widely known. The solution? Invite some strong social media voices to the event, and give them free rein to observe, engage, and respond to what’s going on around them. Smart.

Yes, that’s me at the far end of the picture, behind Alicia Stales (Chief Patient Officer of Akari Health), Susannah Fox (until recently Associate Director, Editorial, of the Pew Research Center’s Internet Project, but now Entrepreneur in Residence at @RWJF), and Pat Mastors (President and Co-Founder of the Patient Voice Institute). Thank you so much to Alicia Aebersold (Senior Vice President at the National Council for Behavioral Health) for the photo. Really, she should have been in the photo, not just taking it! Hard for me to believe I was there, rubbing shoulders with all the glorious people. There were a lot more who aren’t in this photo. I am tempted to start listing names, but if I did I’d leave out someone wonderful.

The AF4Q organizers did a strong job of incorporating social media into the event. They used two official hashtags: #AF4Q for the overall project and organization, #hcvalue for this specific event. These were posted prominently in every room, at the registration desk, and on the banners decorating the meeting space. I complicated matters by adding in custom tags for specific break out sessions, so that I could later distill and collate tweets from specific sub-events. This was pretty easy to do, as the breakout sessions were all numbered, so I’d just add the session number to the end of the shortest tag, like #AF4Q7. In addition to the hashtags, they also had staff assigned to each room and presentation, to make sure that there were official folk tweeting in addition to the invited voices and the attendees. I found it a little confusing that all the official staff tweeting were tweeting using the same account, but from different rooms and different sessions, without any indication of which room they were in or who was tweeting at a particular point. I recommended adding session tags, and the use of initials to distinguish separate voices in the shared account.

With that background, I think it’s time to look at some of the tweets, with the focus being on great ideas, thoughts, and resources shared. (There were selfies galore, but you can find those on your own, if you want the faces to go with the names.)

IDEAS & THOUGHTS

RESOURCES

CLOSING CONCEPTS

AFTERWARDS

Ebola and Emerging Technologies

Ebola & Emerging Tech

Ebola & Emerging Tech: http://www.mindmeister.com/485610588/ebola-emerging-tech

Our local Cool Toys Conversations group had asked to have a discussion of emerging technologies and Ebola, and “could we please have it before the holidays when everyone will be traveling?” I had tried to get this up early last week, but life happened, and so it is coming to you now.

When we started looking at this topic I was surprised to find so much! I probably shouldn’t have been — Ebola is big news. It seems as if everyone doing anything in tech and emerging tech is doing something interesting related to Ebola. Well, except Apple. And that surprised me, too. There were so many links, so many topics, I could have EASILY done a month of daily blogposts just on this topic. Once we started, we kept finding more. The collection of links was getting overblown, random, chaotic, confusing. I decided to organize them all in a mindmap, and doing that took a while. Mindmeister kept saying, “Too many topics at one level!” This is why it is broken down into 4 section, but don’t take those sections too seriously. They are more an artifact of the process than seriously meaningful. Each major topic probably has minor topics and links that could easily belong in another section. For that reason, I thought it might be helpful to give an alphabetic list here of what’s included in the mindmap (which is also where you’ll find all the actual links – hint? Click on the little arrows).

I have so many favorite projects and resources I can’t possibly highlight them all. If life and time permit, I’ll try to throw together a slideshow with screenshots of some of them. Just as teasers, here are just a … a smidgen, a teeny tiny sampling. Tim Unwin wrote a great overview of exciting ways in which emerging technologies are being used in the Ebola crisis. Biosensors, wearable tech, open everything, code repositories, data, genetics, DIYbio, mapping and tracking, apps (tons of them), reverse innovation, open source pharma, gaming, cryogenics, … the list goes on and on. You already know how completely enchanted I am with the maker movement right now, and this is no exception. Makers Against Ebola designed flash sensors and proximity alarms to help prevent contamination while working with patients, pull tabs and zipper extenders to make it easier to get in and out of the Personal Protective Environments (which you might recognize better as hazmat suits). The DIY Ebola Challenge came up with a great variety of open source hardware solutions for scientific equipment, in efforts to design a kit they couple bundle and share at point of need. So far they have centrifuges in all sizes, PCR thermocycler, gel electrophoresis, spectrometers, multichannel pipettes, and more. Other folk are using tools like the Raspberry Pi and Beaglebone Black to design inexpensive syringe pumps and diagnostics. And then there’s robots! Robots to decontaminate, robots to intercede between people and create a distance than may contain the disease (like a social firebreak). The ways in which people are using tech to highlight the personal aspect is also awe-inspiring. From citizen journalism to ebola MOOCs to the WAYout Ebola Song, with every social media tool you can name, someone is doing something to try to help share important stories and information. There is a lot more in the mindmap, with links for everything. There’s even a section on open access images about Ebola to use foe teaching, training, and education. Check it out — here’s an outline.

GENERAL

Articles
Collections

PEOPLE DRIVEN

Advocacy
Citizen Science
Citizen Journalism
Collaboration Tech
Communication (Challenges: Misinformation & Hype, Stigma, Weaponized; Solutions: Education & Training, Ebola Information, MOOCs, Information & Health Literacy, Wikipedia
Social Media
Research
Crowdfunding
Crowdsourcing (Challenges)
Makers & DIY
Open (Open Access, Open Images, Open Data, Open Government, Open IBM, Open Source Code Repositories, Open Source Pharma, Open Sources Wearables)
Reverse Innovation

SCIENCE DRIVEN

Arxiv/bioRxiv
Biohacking / DIYbio / SynBio
Data (Data modeling, Data visualization
Open Data
Diagnostics
Genetics
Mapping / Tracking
Nanosilver
NASA

TECH DRIVEN

3D Printing
Apps
Biosensors
Biotech
DARPA
Biocontainment
Cryogenics
Diagnosis
Gaming
Geolocation / Geotagging / GPS
Hackers
IBM
Mobile
Robotics (Asepsis, Telepresence)
Telemedicine
Wearable Tech (Biocontainment, Personal Protective Environments)