Category Archives: Tech, Tools, Toys

Personalized Medicine, Biosensors, Mobile Medical Apps, and More

At the Quantified Self Meetup, someone was praising the Rock Health slides. Of course, I had to go explore and see what was so great. These are my favorites.

About FDA’s Guidance for Mobile Medical Apps

FDA 101: A guide to the FDA for digital health entrepreneurs by @Rock_Health: http://www.slideshare.net/RockHealth/fda-101-a-guide-to-the-fda-for-digital-health-entrepreneurs

I especially took note of slide 10, where they describe things I would think of as an app, but which do not qualify as such for FDA regulation. This is an important distinction I hadn’t previously considered. Slide 12 takes it further by describing the categories of regulation as based on risk to patients, with good clear examples. Slie 21 on “pro tips” would have really benefitted companies like 23andMe (even though that isn’t actually a mobile medical app, the pro tips still apply, and in spades).

Biosensing Wearable Tech

The Future of Biosensing Wearables by @Rock_Health http://www.slideshare.net/RockHealth/the-future-of-biosensing-wearables-by-rockhealth

This one definitely gets into topics relevant to the quantified self movement and self-tracking. Slide six emphasizes the shift from the low hanging fruit (fitness, pulse, sleep) to the long tail — more targeted solutions for specific challenges (hydration, glucose, salinity, skin conductance, posture, oxygenation, heart rhythm, respiration, eyetracking, brain activity, etc.). That’s really quite interesting, and it gives examples of companies working in each space.

Slides 19-24 get into several of the areas our own local meetup defined as challenges to success for companies working in this space and for the future success of the entire area — it has to work, easily, and dependably. Slides 27-30 extrapolate these challenges into the transition into healthcare environments.

Personalized Medicine

The Future of Personalized Health Care: Predictive Analytics by @Rock_Health http://www.slideshare.net/RockHealth/the-future-of-personalized-health-care-predictive-analytics-press Video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UJak41hIDWc

SLIDES

VIDEO

It’s probably safe to say that most individuals working in the quantified self / self-tracking space eventually end up struggling with the issue of how to use their data to anticipate avoidable problems. This idea can be translated into the jargon phrase of “predictive analytics.” Slide 11 does a nice job of lining this up with how traditional healthcare is practiced, which is very useful. Slide 12 places this in the context of big data resources, databases, and tools, listing several of the main players. This context is essential for making personal data relevant beyond the drawn out process of n=1 studies. Slide 14 identifies the BIG problem of how companies working in this space largely focus on hospitals and health care providers, and seem to have entirely missed the idea that patients are deeply and actively engaged in this space. And, frankly, there are more of us than them (even if our pockets aren’t as deep). I love the phrase on slide 18, “Symptom calculators are the “recommendation engines” of health care.” Most of the rest of the deck identifies challenges and opportunities, which I hope any entrepreneurial types would examine closely. Do notice that there is a video with this one. You can hear the entire webinar as well as reviewing the slides.

Quantified Self Meetup, Ann Arbor

Cool Toys, Devices, Quantified Self

Last week, I felt really lucky that I was able to make it to the first Quantified Self Meetup of the New Year (thanks to Nancy Gilby for the ride!). This session was held at the UMSI Entrepreneurship Center. Roughly ten folk came, and I’m not sharing names even though they said I could because I’m not sure I got the names down right. The group included a wide range of types of people: corporate folk, students, entrepreneurs, faculty, alumni, and independents. The conversation was fast, dynamic, and overlapping, so I couldn’t catch everything. I will talk about what I did catch of the IDEAS and the GADGETS. That’s what’s really fun, eh?

INTERESTS

What the Meetup group page SAYS they are interested in (as a sampling) is pretty extensive.

“Aging in Place Technology • Behavior change and monitoring • Caregiving of digital patients • Chemical Body Load Counts • Citizen science• Digitizing Body Info • Medical Self-Diagnostics • Lifelogging• Location tracking • Non-invasive Probes• Mindfulness and wisdom tracking • Parenting through monitoring/ tracking • Personal Genome Sequencing • Psychological Self-Assessments • Risks/Legal Rights/Duties • Self Experimentation • Sharing Health Records • Wearable Sensemaking”

What’s even more interesting is what people said they were interested in as they went around the table.

  • aging population
  • big data
  • biohacking
  • data visualization
  • diabetes
  • epigenetics
  • fitness
  • geofencing
  • legal advice
  • patient communities
  • personal genomics
  • sleep tracking
  • telehealth

The “legal advice” bit? That was from someone planning a wearable tech start up. They got some interesting answers on that point: Scott Olson, of UM’s Pediatric Device Consortium; SPARK; Medical Innovation Center, Fast Forward Medical Innovation, and (depending on your UM affiliation) possibly the Student Legal Services, UM’s Startup Law Clinic (Twitter), Zell Lurie Institute.

For the personal genomics, it was a great surprise to me to meet another person who knows their MTHFR status (and who also has two defective copies of the gene, AND is working on problem solving as hard as I am)! We were swapping info, apps, diet tips and tricks, formulations of supplements, and more. There just wasn’t enough time to dig as deeply into this as I wished. I did get to do my now normal rant, “23andMe was NOT killed off!”

ISSUES

After introductions, we just had an open conversation, much of which touched on challenges in quantified self tools. This was what had the meeting stretching WAY past the planned time!

  • QS devices are not being designed for longevity, but for rapid failure
  • QS devices are not being designed to actually work, by and large, which is frustrating to folk buying them early, and an argument for doing QS with low-tech self-hacked solutions
  • to integrate into personal healthcare solutions, there is a need for calibration with official medical devices
  • how are data measurements defined? it. “sleep” cycles based on movement, rather than REM cycles.
  • desperate need for standards of measurement, to empower folk wanting to discover trends and patterns across tools, data sources, and apps
  • who is funding these?
  • data visualization for self-discovery; “correlation” vs aggregator apps; challenges of meaningful analysis
  • HIPAA and QS: patient self-reporting data as an FDA loophole; PHI – Personal Health Information (personal sharing loophole)
  • requirements for insurance coverage – need doctor’s prescription for some very useful medical devices; reimbursement codes can be tricky
  • reverse innovation
  • risk science, risk of failure, costs of failure
  • when designing a device, think about how will it fail?
    design for how to make it work or how to make it fail?
  • how can small companies compete? “innovative/unique, protected, acquired”
  • security, open data, hack into someone else’s data, ownership of data

Any one of these could easily be a devoted session, presentation, or series of blogposts. The bit about failure especially interested me. The idea was that these devices seem to be being designed to fail, as is pretty standard for tech in general these days. But what happens to the end user if they get to the point where they trust the wearable tech device, trust its data, and can’t tell that it has stopped working properly or is on the verge of failure? The FDA keeps tabs on what happens with medical device failures in their MAUDE database. The problem is that this only applies to devices that go through FDA approval, and most of the wearable tech devices folk use for biohacking or self-tracking personal health information, well, they are not FDA approved. People were talking about how much risk is there, impacts, and devices that are low risk. I shared a story of a time when a blood pressure cuff lead to a fatality some decades ago. That was pretty shocking to them, because we tend to think of blood pressure cuffs as being pretty innocuous. How did it happen? It failed during surgery, and kept giving normal readings when the patient was actually having trouble. The idea was that even simple tech can have serious impacts when the stakes are high and people are depending on it.

DEVICES, SERVICES, APPS, & MORE

Of course, we all had to talk about our toys, how we like them or don’t, what we’d change, what we’re thinking about buying, our experiences with customer service from the different companies, companies that are failing or expanding, new releases, etc. I tried to keep a list of devices mentioned or waved around (not all of which were pertinent to QS), but I’m pretty sure I missed a few. The same is true of services, apps, and such, but I’ll give links for the ones I caught.

DEVICES

While most of the gadgets mentioned were in the room and functional, that wasn’t true across the board. Some of these were mentioned as warnings (“a glorified pedometer” “gave me headaches” “out of business”), so please don’t take this list as an endorsement.

SERVICES

I know there was another few genetic analysis tools mentioned that I can’t remember, and I’m really frustrated that I can’t remember. Later, trying to prod my memory, I found this great list (“What else can I do with my DNA test results?“) but I’m still hoping that the person who mentioned the other tools will comment on this post with what I missed.

APPS / SOFTWARE

The apps here include tools for mobile and desktop, for data analysis, self-tracking, behavior modification, communities, and time management / lifehacking. What isn’t included is the conversation about low-tech alternatives, such as replacing calorie counting apps with photos of what you ate, or using notebooks instead of tracking apps. Quantified self doesn’t have to take a lot of money and gadgets (but perhaps that should be a separate post).

RESOURCES

Please note that this is NOT a collection of the best ever anywhere resources on Quantified Self, but rather (as with all the other lists in this post) a collection of what was mentioned during the meeting.

Last but not least, I collected a whole bunch of links I stumbled on during the meeting in one large “OneTab” collection. It includes 76 web pages that I wanted to come back to, reflecting more details or random conversation digressions. You can find it here: http://www.one-tab.com/page/EKdC99v0Q2-nZYfOm41lOw.

Ebola and Emerging Technologies

Ebola & Emerging Tech

Ebola & Emerging Tech: http://www.mindmeister.com/485610588/ebola-emerging-tech

Our local Cool Toys Conversations group had asked to have a discussion of emerging technologies and Ebola, and “could we please have it before the holidays when everyone will be traveling?” I had tried to get this up early last week, but life happened, and so it is coming to you now.

When we started looking at this topic I was surprised to find so much! I probably shouldn’t have been — Ebola is big news. It seems as if everyone doing anything in tech and emerging tech is doing something interesting related to Ebola. Well, except Apple. And that surprised me, too. There were so many links, so many topics, I could have EASILY done a month of daily blogposts just on this topic. Once we started, we kept finding more. The collection of links was getting overblown, random, chaotic, confusing. I decided to organize them all in a mindmap, and doing that took a while. Mindmeister kept saying, “Too many topics at one level!” This is why it is broken down into 4 section, but don’t take those sections too seriously. They are more an artifact of the process than seriously meaningful. Each major topic probably has minor topics and links that could easily belong in another section. For that reason, I thought it might be helpful to give an alphabetic list here of what’s included in the mindmap (which is also where you’ll find all the actual links – hint? Click on the little arrows).

I have so many favorite projects and resources I can’t possibly highlight them all. If life and time permit, I’ll try to throw together a slideshow with screenshots of some of them. Just as teasers, here are just a … a smidgen, a teeny tiny sampling. Tim Unwin wrote a great overview of exciting ways in which emerging technologies are being used in the Ebola crisis. Biosensors, wearable tech, open everything, code repositories, data, genetics, DIYbio, mapping and tracking, apps (tons of them), reverse innovation, open source pharma, gaming, cryogenics, … the list goes on and on. You already know how completely enchanted I am with the maker movement right now, and this is no exception. Makers Against Ebola designed flash sensors and proximity alarms to help prevent contamination while working with patients, pull tabs and zipper extenders to make it easier to get in and out of the Personal Protective Environments (which you might recognize better as hazmat suits). The DIY Ebola Challenge came up with a great variety of open source hardware solutions for scientific equipment, in efforts to design a kit they couple bundle and share at point of need. So far they have centrifuges in all sizes, PCR thermocycler, gel electrophoresis, spectrometers, multichannel pipettes, and more. Other folk are using tools like the Raspberry Pi and Beaglebone Black to design inexpensive syringe pumps and diagnostics. And then there’s robots! Robots to decontaminate, robots to intercede between people and create a distance than may contain the disease (like a social firebreak). The ways in which people are using tech to highlight the personal aspect is also awe-inspiring. From citizen journalism to ebola MOOCs to the WAYout Ebola Song, with every social media tool you can name, someone is doing something to try to help share important stories and information. There is a lot more in the mindmap, with links for everything. There’s even a section on open access images about Ebola to use foe teaching, training, and education. Check it out — here’s an outline.

GENERAL

Articles
Collections

PEOPLE DRIVEN

Advocacy
Citizen Science
Citizen Journalism
Collaboration Tech
Communication (Challenges: Misinformation & Hype, Stigma, Weaponized; Solutions: Education & Training, Ebola Information, MOOCs, Information & Health Literacy, Wikipedia
Social Media
Research
Crowdfunding
Crowdsourcing (Challenges)
Makers & DIY
Open (Open Access, Open Images, Open Data, Open Government, Open IBM, Open Source Code Repositories, Open Source Pharma, Open Sources Wearables)
Reverse Innovation

SCIENCE DRIVEN

Arxiv/bioRxiv
Biohacking / DIYbio / SynBio
Data (Data modeling, Data visualization
Open Data
Diagnostics
Genetics
Mapping / Tracking
Nanosilver
NASA

TECH DRIVEN

3D Printing
Apps
Biosensors
Biotech
DARPA
Biocontainment
Cryogenics
Diagnosis
Gaming
Geolocation / Geotagging / GPS
Hackers
IBM
Mobile
Robotics (Asepsis, Telepresence)
Telemedicine
Wearable Tech (Biocontainment, Personal Protective Environments)

Anonymous Social Media Overview, Part Three: The Whisper Controversy & Beyond

I had said in Part Two of this series that I was waiting to talk about the Whisper Controversy because it was still unfolding so dramatically. Things are starting to wind down, and so last night I put together a Storify mapping out my perspective of the timeline of how this has all been happening.

Briefly, Whisper was trying to do a good thing, but it seemed to go wrong.
Guardian called them out on issues related to privacy & user tracking.
Story exploded.
Whisper defended themselves (mostly via Editor-in-Chief).
More explosions.
Guardian gleefully expanded on their original story.
Yada yada.
Whisper tries to regain trust (mostly via CEO).
Editorial team “laid off” pending investigation.
And now the clean up work starts.

Check the Storify for more details and specifics.

Meanwhile, Whisper is not alone. Far from it! Snapchat was hacked. Snapchat is probably the most famous anonymous social media app right now. Before they were hacked, all sorts of people were making tools (1, 2, 3) to “break” Snapchat’s rules about keeping copies of deleted pictures without permission. (The same sort of thing is happening on other ‘anonymous’ social platforms, like Tumblr with KnowAnon. And people posted private sex tapes on YikYak, which is also infamous for cyberbullying and violence and threats.) And the Federal Trade Commission is investigating some of the problems with Snapchat. People still trust and use Snapchat. And there are apps designed explicitly to, well, invade your privacy on an opt-in basis, like PeekInToo. This post has focused on the privacy issues, but violence, dishonesty, and cyberbullying remain significant issues in many online spaces. So, that’s the bad news. In the next post, I’ll look at some of the good things being done with social media.

Anonymous Social Media Overview, Part One: Context, Risks, Benefits & Opportunities, Best Practices

CONTEXT

Following on the heels of Monday’s post about suicide prevention as it intersects with anonymous social media, I thought it might be helpful to have an overview of some anonymous social media apps, and the current state of the conversation around their risks and benefits. One of the reasons this seems to keep coming up is the NYMWARS (or, as Danah Boyd puts it, The politics of “real names”). While this issue arose originally in 2011, it never seems to really go away. Today’s Twitter feed for the hashtag #nymwars gives evidence of this.

There is a lot more where that came from. Danah described the issue as being one of power and control.

“When people are expected to lead with their names, their power to control a social situation is undermined. Power shifts. The observer, armed with a search engine and identifiable information, has greater control over the social situation than the person presenting information about themselves. The loss of control is precisely why such situations feel so public. Yet, ironically, the sites that promise privacy and control are often those that demand users to reveal their names.” Comm ACM 2012 55(8):29-31.

There are many who believe that requiring transparency (as in ‘real name’, as in the name on your birth certificate) of all users helps to protect the community from bullying and rudeness and other uncivil behavior. This is debatable, and there is supporting evidence on both sides of the debate. At the same time, forced transparency endangers others in the community (anyone at risk or in a marginalized population) at the same time it undermines identifying anyone who uses a pseudonym as their primary identity.

Facebook is enforcing its “real names” policy, insidiously outing a disproportionate number of gay, trans and adult performers — placing them at risk for attacks, stalking, privacy violations and more. Facebook is strong-arming LGBT and adult performers to use their legal names, telling these at-risk populations that it is to “keep our community safe.” Facebook nymwars: Disproportionately outing LGBT performers, users furious

While there is an acknowledged emphasis in the current fuss over Facebook names on excluding LGBT persons, the problem is much broader, and also effects many people with unusual real names. Chase Nahooikaikakeolamauloaokalani Silva is one recent example, but it is so common that Facebook has a section of their help site devoted to these incidents.

"Facebook says my name is fake. It is real."
Facebook says my name is fake. It is real. https://www.facebook.com/help/community/question/?id=10151790248568209

Unfortunately, when this happens to people, Facebook will only consider correcting the problem when supplied with a copy of a legal government ID, such as a passport, drivers license, or birth certificate. Sometimes, those aren’t good enough, which REALLY annoys people. If it was me, I would not be happy or feel safe supplying a copy of my government ID to Facebook or via electronic means. That entire approach is not only an invasion of privacy, but a strategy that would seem to place the victim at risk of identity theft. It just makes me really nervous. When this arose back in 2011, the Electronic Frontier Foundation distilled the concept of NYMWARS as an important trend for that year.

EFF immediately advocated for the right of users to choose their own names on social networking sites, whether they’re women or minorities concerned about their privacy, activists in authoritarian regimes who want to speak out without the threat of government harassment, or users with persistent nicknames or pseudonyms they’d used online for years…. EFF had been loudly opposed to Facebook’s “real names” policy for years, pointing out that community policing of real names silences some of the people who need this protection the most—people with unpopular opinions—because opponents can easily have their accounts suspended by reporting them as pseudonymous. 2011 in Review: Nymwars.

My favorite piece, and the best short distillation I’ve seen was posted to Facebook a little over a week ago by one of my favorite people in healthcare social media, @DrSnit. It is substantially excerpted here with permission.

Requiring a “legal name” is problematic for the following: 1) counselors and therapists avoiding a stalking client 2) physicians avoiding patients seeking medical advice 3) Attorneys dealing with angry criminals with a vendetta 4) women (like me) dealing with abusive partners & leaving abusive relationships. Those people who are being stalked or have been stalked WHO DO NOT WISH TO BE FOUND BY THEIR EX’S OR EX’S FAMILY & FRIENDS 5) Gender queer people, butch lesbians, and trans people who use different names than the names they were given at birth. 6) Stage performers, writers, artists who use different names for their art and their family / friends 7) People who use their middle names or nick names from birth or derivatives from birth. (This is off the top of my head – not exhaustive list).

Legal names are good for: stalkers, abusers, ADVERTISERS

FB claims it is to keep stalkers and abusers from taking fake names to harm people – but stalkers are REALLY GOOD at what they do and use nefarious methods to deal their damage. FB isn’t protecting anyone. They are harming people who CHOOSE to use different names because because it messes with their advertising analytics. Don’t let them. You don’t NEED FB bad enough to be harmed by their policy. If anyone you know has been hurt or stalked – let FB know and if they don’t change their policy – use other social media that is more women and safety friendly.

Let me repeat the most important line.

Legal names are good for: stalkers, abusers, ADVERTISERS

So, with that as context, perhaps the explosion of anonymous social networks may be, at least in part, a reaction to the forced transparency of other social networks. I have friends who have always used a “fake” name on Facebook. It is their real identity, and it sounds and looks like a normal name, and Facebook has never given them any trouble about it. I also know of those who are using their legal name, and getting hassled about it. The upshot is that anonymous networks are a justifiable response, but they carry their own risks, and their own benefits. Let’s take a quick look at some of these.

RISKS

There are a lot of nasty words tossed around about the bad side of anonymous online services. The big ones seem to be that (1) they are not really anonymous; (2) people are mean (bullying & more); (3) you can be victimized in many different ways. Here are some of the types of words used in articles that describe the risks of anonymous social media and social networks.

abuse
bullying
character assassination
hacking
harassment
identifiability
falsehoods
lies
not anonymous
prejudice
racism
rape
sexism
sexting
sexual predators
solicitation
stalking

BENEFITS / OPPORTUNITIES

Safe spaces for persons who need anonymity to be safe or to be treated equitably, such as
– Battered wives,
– Persons who are part of a marginalized or abused community,
– Celebrities,
– Whistleblowers,
– Political minorities,
– Political dissidents,
– Crime witnesses.

Suicide prevention & outreach.

Crime prevention

Therapeutic benefits of engaging for those with social anxiety.

Reaching out to those who suffer from shame.

Free speech on unpopular issues without fear of reprisal

Domestic violence support groups or outreach

Advice channels / threads / tags

Therapeutic channels / threads / tags

BEST PRACTICES FOR ENGAGING (MAYBE)

Don’t ask / Don’t tell (personal information).

Don’t identify yourself.

Don’t use your name.

Don’t use a known pseudonym.

Don’t use a friend’s name.

Don’t ask others to identify themselves.

Don’t describe your location, appearance, or other identifiable characteristics.

Don’t give your email address, street address, phone number, or other direct contact information.

Ask others you trust if they’ve had good or bad experiences there.

Post harmless stuff while testing.

TEST IT OUT!!

MORE SOURCES

(1995) Rigby, Karina. Anonymity on the Internet Must be Protected. http://groups.csail.mit.edu/mac/classes/6.805/student-papers/fall95-papers/rigby-anonymity.html

(2002) Dvorjak, John C. Pros and cons of anonymity. http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,801688,00.asp

(2011) Bayley, Alex Skud. Preliminary results of my survey of suspended Google+ accounts. http://infotrope.net/2011/07/25/preliminary-results-of-my-survey-of-suspended-google-accounts/

(2011) McElroy, Wendy. In Defense of Internet Anonymity. http://mises.org/daily/5541/

(2011-2014) Geek Feminism Wiki. Who is harmed by a “Real Names” policy? http://geekfeminism.wikia.com/wiki/Who_is_harmed_by_a_”Real_Names”_policy

(2013) Santana, Arthur D. Virtuous or Vitriolic: The effect of anonymity on civility in online newspaper reader comment boards. http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/17512786.2013.813194

Common Problems in Systematic Review Searches: Right Side Truncation? NOT! (A PreziTube Test)


Common Problems in Systematic Review Searches: Right Side Truncation? NOT! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WMLiozo-lwg

A couple days ago, I was offered a coupon / voucher to test PreziTube. PreziTube is a tool that automatically exports your Prezi presentation to a Youtube video format, both downloadable and with the option of automatically uploading to Youtube. For this test, the automatic upload option ended up in their Youtube account, not mine, and I am not sure if there is an option to work around that if you pay for the privilege.

Playing with Prezitube & iMovie
PreziTube: http://prezitube.com/

Now, I’ve had issues for a LOOOONG time with the lack of accessibility in Prezi. This seemed like a tool that might help with some portion of that process, so I was interested. Definitely interested.

I went to Prezi to find whichever of my Prezi presentations is the most popular. Ah, yes, one on systematic review searching and truncation.

Systematic Review Searching: Right-Side Truncation? NOT! http://prezi.com/77qy3sfhq_tv/systematic-review-searching-right-side-truncation-not/

I put in the link and the voucher code and gave it a try.

Playing with Prezitube & iMovie

Prezitube offers a variety of timing options, but the assumption is that each “slide” within the Prezi will receive the same length of time. Since this presentation was rather text heavy, and I wasn’t sure just how long these times, I went for the middle. The range offered is from 4 to 30, and for this video I chose 15.

I downloaded the video, wished I had an audio voiceover, but didn’t want to take the time, so I just grabbed some amusing-to-me public domain audio from the Internet Archive, and spliced that in with iMovie. I have access to other video editing tools, but I wanted to see what could be done with virtually no resources.

Playing with Prezitube & iMovie

And the link to the audio track used.

Kay Kyser – Some Day I’ll Find You 1937 (posted as “Kay Kaiser&kollegeOf MusicalKnowkege10f2″) https://archive.org/details/KayKaiserkollegeofMusicalknowkege10f2

Now, this took almost no time at all. It probably took me about a half hour to make the video. It took me about 2 hours to upload it to Youtube, because Youtube was being glitchy that day. Not great, but absolutely worth a half hour of my time.

Now, do I want to do this for more Prezis? The free version gives you tiny videos and you can’t download. For $6.99 you may download and get high resolution videos, with support if something goes wrong. Hmmm, maybe, maybe. Maybe next time, I’ll do the systematic review Prezi on phrase searching.

Systematic Review Searching: Word Order in Phrase Searching http://prezi.com/vrzaimpaignp/systematic-review-searching-word-order-in-phrase-searching/

Infographic of the Week: HHS Infographics Collection!

HHS Infographics on Flickr
Flickr: Group: HHS Infographics: https://www.flickr.com/groups/hhsinfographics/

I just discovered a Flickr group that collects infographics from the US Department of Health and Human Services. WOW. Talk about a great resource! There are many infographics in the collection, and also marketing images for specific health challenges or initiatives.

HHS Infographics on Flickr

This isn’t all they have, though! You can many of these in sets or albums from the HHSgov Flickr Stream.

Flickr: HHS: Sets: Health Care Infographics: https://www.flickr.com/photos/hhsgov/sets/72157633968047018/

Flickr: HHS: Sets: HHS Infographics: https://www.flickr.com/photos/hhsgov/sets/72157632180365890/

Now, it is completely wonderful to have a one stop shop to go hunt health infographics from a reliable source and of known high quality. Extremely useful! But this is even better than that. Because these are in a Flickr Group, there are many other things you can do.

If you have a Flickr account, you can request to join to track the images that appear in the group, or you can use the RSS feed from the group in your feed reader.

You could set up a computer display in a public area, and start the “slideshow” view from the group as a way to engage the public around quality health information.

Because these are licensed as “United States government work,” you can download these, re-use them, post them yourself, put them on your website, edit and modify them. As they say:

Anyone may, without restriction under U.S. copyright laws:
* reproduce the work in print or digital form;
* create derivative works;
* perform the work publicly;
* display the work;
* distribute copies or digitally transfer the work to the public by sale or other transfer of ownership, or by rental, lease, or lending.

Niiiiiice.

However, because these are in Flickr, the absolute easiest way to share them is to just embed them on your webpage or site, or share the link wherever you wish. Here’s an example.

Recently, I’ve been seeing many conversations on social media, on Twitter, Facebook, and in blogs, about issues with patients access to their electronic health record and problems with the accuracy of the information in their record. Right now, this is again a timely issue. The HHS has a series of four short infographics on exactly this topic. I can choose one or any or all and, with a Flickr account, grab the embed code to put them in this blogpost without having to download or upload or rename or identify or worry about the accessibility of the code. Here’s what it looks like.

Know Your HIPAA Rights #1Know Your HIPAA Rights #2
Know Your HIPAA Rights #3Know Your HIPAA Rights #4

If someone clicks on any of the four images above, it will take them to the original image, in a larger size. The source is right there, and I didn’t have to do the work. So very helpful. I love this resource. So glad I found them!