Category Archives: Gadgets

Personalized Medicine, Biosensors, Mobile Medical Apps, and More

At the Quantified Self Meetup, someone was praising the Rock Health slides. Of course, I had to go explore and see what was so great. These are my favorites.

About FDA’s Guidance for Mobile Medical Apps

FDA 101: A guide to the FDA for digital health entrepreneurs by @Rock_Health: http://www.slideshare.net/RockHealth/fda-101-a-guide-to-the-fda-for-digital-health-entrepreneurs

I especially took note of slide 10, where they describe things I would think of as an app, but which do not qualify as such for FDA regulation. This is an important distinction I hadn’t previously considered. Slide 12 takes it further by describing the categories of regulation as based on risk to patients, with good clear examples. Slie 21 on “pro tips” would have really benefitted companies like 23andMe (even though that isn’t actually a mobile medical app, the pro tips still apply, and in spades).

Biosensing Wearable Tech

The Future of Biosensing Wearables by @Rock_Health http://www.slideshare.net/RockHealth/the-future-of-biosensing-wearables-by-rockhealth

This one definitely gets into topics relevant to the quantified self movement and self-tracking. Slide six emphasizes the shift from the low hanging fruit (fitness, pulse, sleep) to the long tail — more targeted solutions for specific challenges (hydration, glucose, salinity, skin conductance, posture, oxygenation, heart rhythm, respiration, eyetracking, brain activity, etc.). That’s really quite interesting, and it gives examples of companies working in each space.

Slides 19-24 get into several of the areas our own local meetup defined as challenges to success for companies working in this space and for the future success of the entire area — it has to work, easily, and dependably. Slides 27-30 extrapolate these challenges into the transition into healthcare environments.

Personalized Medicine

The Future of Personalized Health Care: Predictive Analytics by @Rock_Health http://www.slideshare.net/RockHealth/the-future-of-personalized-health-care-predictive-analytics-press Video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UJak41hIDWc

SLIDES

VIDEO

It’s probably safe to say that most individuals working in the quantified self / self-tracking space eventually end up struggling with the issue of how to use their data to anticipate avoidable problems. This idea can be translated into the jargon phrase of “predictive analytics.” Slide 11 does a nice job of lining this up with how traditional healthcare is practiced, which is very useful. Slide 12 places this in the context of big data resources, databases, and tools, listing several of the main players. This context is essential for making personal data relevant beyond the drawn out process of n=1 studies. Slide 14 identifies the BIG problem of how companies working in this space largely focus on hospitals and health care providers, and seem to have entirely missed the idea that patients are deeply and actively engaged in this space. And, frankly, there are more of us than them (even if our pockets aren’t as deep). I love the phrase on slide 18, “Symptom calculators are the “recommendation engines” of health care.” Most of the rest of the deck identifies challenges and opportunities, which I hope any entrepreneurial types would examine closely. Do notice that there is a video with this one. You can hear the entire webinar as well as reviewing the slides.

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Quantified Self Meetup, Ann Arbor

Cool Toys, Devices, Quantified Self

Last week, I felt really lucky that I was able to make it to the first Quantified Self Meetup of the New Year (thanks to Nancy Gilby for the ride!). This session was held at the UMSI Entrepreneurship Center. Roughly ten folk came, and I’m not sharing names even though they said I could because I’m not sure I got the names down right. The group included a wide range of types of people: corporate folk, students, entrepreneurs, faculty, alumni, and independents. The conversation was fast, dynamic, and overlapping, so I couldn’t catch everything. I will talk about what I did catch of the IDEAS and the GADGETS. That’s what’s really fun, eh?

INTERESTS

What the Meetup group page SAYS they are interested in (as a sampling) is pretty extensive.

“Aging in Place Technology • Behavior change and monitoring • Caregiving of digital patients • Chemical Body Load Counts • Citizen science• Digitizing Body Info • Medical Self-Diagnostics • Lifelogging• Location tracking • Non-invasive Probes• Mindfulness and wisdom tracking • Parenting through monitoring/ tracking • Personal Genome Sequencing • Psychological Self-Assessments • Risks/Legal Rights/Duties • Self Experimentation • Sharing Health Records • Wearable Sensemaking”

What’s even more interesting is what people said they were interested in as they went around the table.

  • aging population
  • big data
  • biohacking
  • data visualization
  • diabetes
  • epigenetics
  • fitness
  • geofencing
  • legal advice
  • patient communities
  • personal genomics
  • sleep tracking
  • telehealth

The “legal advice” bit? That was from someone planning a wearable tech start up. They got some interesting answers on that point: Scott Olson, of UM’s Pediatric Device Consortium; SPARK; Medical Innovation Center, Fast Forward Medical Innovation, and (depending on your UM affiliation) possibly the Student Legal Services, UM’s Startup Law Clinic (Twitter), Zell Lurie Institute.

For the personal genomics, it was a great surprise to me to meet another person who knows their MTHFR status (and who also has two defective copies of the gene, AND is working on problem solving as hard as I am)! We were swapping info, apps, diet tips and tricks, formulations of supplements, and more. There just wasn’t enough time to dig as deeply into this as I wished. I did get to do my now normal rant, “23andMe was NOT killed off!”

ISSUES

After introductions, we just had an open conversation, much of which touched on challenges in quantified self tools. This was what had the meeting stretching WAY past the planned time!

  • QS devices are not being designed for longevity, but for rapid failure
  • QS devices are not being designed to actually work, by and large, which is frustrating to folk buying them early, and an argument for doing QS with low-tech self-hacked solutions
  • to integrate into personal healthcare solutions, there is a need for calibration with official medical devices
  • how are data measurements defined? it. “sleep” cycles based on movement, rather than REM cycles.
  • desperate need for standards of measurement, to empower folk wanting to discover trends and patterns across tools, data sources, and apps
  • who is funding these?
  • data visualization for self-discovery; “correlation” vs aggregator apps; challenges of meaningful analysis
  • HIPAA and QS: patient self-reporting data as an FDA loophole; PHI – Personal Health Information (personal sharing loophole)
  • requirements for insurance coverage – need doctor’s prescription for some very useful medical devices; reimbursement codes can be tricky
  • reverse innovation
  • risk science, risk of failure, costs of failure
  • when designing a device, think about how will it fail?
    design for how to make it work or how to make it fail?
  • how can small companies compete? “innovative/unique, protected, acquired”
  • security, open data, hack into someone else’s data, ownership of data

Any one of these could easily be a devoted session, presentation, or series of blogposts. The bit about failure especially interested me. The idea was that these devices seem to be being designed to fail, as is pretty standard for tech in general these days. But what happens to the end user if they get to the point where they trust the wearable tech device, trust its data, and can’t tell that it has stopped working properly or is on the verge of failure? The FDA keeps tabs on what happens with medical device failures in their MAUDE database. The problem is that this only applies to devices that go through FDA approval, and most of the wearable tech devices folk use for biohacking or self-tracking personal health information, well, they are not FDA approved. People were talking about how much risk is there, impacts, and devices that are low risk. I shared a story of a time when a blood pressure cuff lead to a fatality some decades ago. That was pretty shocking to them, because we tend to think of blood pressure cuffs as being pretty innocuous. How did it happen? It failed during surgery, and kept giving normal readings when the patient was actually having trouble. The idea was that even simple tech can have serious impacts when the stakes are high and people are depending on it.

DEVICES, SERVICES, APPS, & MORE

Of course, we all had to talk about our toys, how we like them or don’t, what we’d change, what we’re thinking about buying, our experiences with customer service from the different companies, companies that are failing or expanding, new releases, etc. I tried to keep a list of devices mentioned or waved around (not all of which were pertinent to QS), but I’m pretty sure I missed a few. The same is true of services, apps, and such, but I’ll give links for the ones I caught.

DEVICES

While most of the gadgets mentioned were in the room and functional, that wasn’t true across the board. Some of these were mentioned as warnings (“a glorified pedometer” “gave me headaches” “out of business”), so please don’t take this list as an endorsement.

SERVICES

I know there was another few genetic analysis tools mentioned that I can’t remember, and I’m really frustrated that I can’t remember. Later, trying to prod my memory, I found this great list (“What else can I do with my DNA test results?“) but I’m still hoping that the person who mentioned the other tools will comment on this post with what I missed.

APPS / SOFTWARE

The apps here include tools for mobile and desktop, for data analysis, self-tracking, behavior modification, communities, and time management / lifehacking. What isn’t included is the conversation about low-tech alternatives, such as replacing calorie counting apps with photos of what you ate, or using notebooks instead of tracking apps. Quantified self doesn’t have to take a lot of money and gadgets (but perhaps that should be a separate post).

RESOURCES

Please note that this is NOT a collection of the best ever anywhere resources on Quantified Self, but rather (as with all the other lists in this post) a collection of what was mentioned during the meeting.

Last but not least, I collected a whole bunch of links I stumbled on during the meeting in one large “OneTab” collection. It includes 76 web pages that I wanted to come back to, reflecting more details or random conversation digressions. You can find it here: http://www.one-tab.com/page/EKdC99v0Q2-nZYfOm41lOw.

[#makehealth] Connecting Making (Hacking, Tinkering) to Health

GO-Tech Meeting at Maker WorksAnn Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2014Detroit Maker Faire 2013

So, you’re a Maker, Hacker, Tinkerer, Inventor, DIYer, Code Monkey, or all around Geek, and you think this #MakeHealth Fest sounds interesting and fun. You’re thinking of getting involved, BUT … (and it’s a big “but”) you’re not doing anything exactly, well, health-ish, not that you can think of, anyway. That’s why I’m writing this — just to show how some of these ‘traditional’ maker activities can connect to health projects, can help real people, if you want, in accessible real world ways. I wish I’d had time to make this into a lot of smaller posts, but we’re sending out the #makehealth call for participation next week, and I want all of you to think about how you could be involved or what you’d like to see when you come. You are coming, of course. 😉


3D printing

3d printer printing

I talk about 3d printing a lot. You know, Robohand, Project Daniel, babies with new tracheas, men with new faces, and more. But those are the exceptional examples that make the news. There are so many ways in which 3D printing is helping in more mundane ways. I had a shoulder and wrist injury and was having trouble opening jars. I found I could 3D print a jar lid gripper. Engineering students and physical therapy students at University of Detroit Mercy collaborated on designing better spoons (which they 3D printed). People are using 3D printing to repair broken equipment, make equipment clips to hold wires out of the road, practical things like that. Healthcare students have been using 3d printing to modify or adapt their stethoscopes. There are so many possibilities. It doesn’t have to be earth shattering to be a useful skill.


Arduino Uno, Beaglebone & Raspberry Pi

Raspberry pi

Arduino Uno, Beaglebone, and Raspberry Pi are inexpensive computing hardware, often used as controllers (microcontrollers) to get other equipment or objects to do something you want. They are incredible for assistive technologies! Something a person wants to do, perhaps used to do, but which is hard for them to do — is there a way you could design an inexpensive object to help them do it? Maybe remote control lights, sound, monitors? Connect them with sensors or trackers to do something when the input reaches a particular level.

How does this connect with health? Many ways. Firstly, most maker techniques and tools can be used as assistive technologies. Try searching any of these with the word(s) assistive or “assistive tech” or “assistive technology”, and you will find a flood of applications.

Google Search: (“Arduino Uno” OR Beaglebone OR “Raspberry Pi”) assistive

Secondly, connecting this to sensors automatically makes possible a wealth of applications in the area of the Quantified Self movement – tracking data about your self and/or home or environment with a goal of promoting and achieving personal health goals. These have been used for personal cardiac monitoring, tracking ECG and pulse rate, blood pressure; it can be used for other types of sensors — GPS, saline levels, alcohol levels, whatever sensors you have; to create a home sleep lab; managing data from mobile phone apps or GPS, such as exercise and calorie expenditure for weight loss; taking prescription meds on time; and much more. These are such inexpensive tools that they really lower the barrier to entry for many folk to get engaged in more hands-on tracking and management to match their personal goals.


Coding & Code-a-thon, Hackerspace & Hackathon

ImageJ Code Sample

The hardware isn’t much use without code to tell it what to do, so these seem like obvious connections. Everything mentioned in the prior section apply here. Because coding need not be device specific, these can have broader impact, tying in to larger computers, mobile devices, and the whole internet. This broader context makes possible doing things beyond the immediate home environment: tracking air quality issues, localized car emissions, and environmental pollution; customizing or personalizing uses of data from hospital equipment or medical records. This is such a huge idea that there are enormous numbers of events and spaces around the idea of coding for solving healthcare problems.

Google Search: (hackathon OR hackerspace OR hacking OR codathon OR codeathon) (healthcare OR health OR hospital OR quantified OR self)

Maybe you’ve already done some home-gown coding projects to help you in your own life, but you didn’t think of them as being about health as much as just life hacks. There is a lot of interest in those types of home-grown solutions (and finding partners to code ideas other folk have) for exactly those types of projects. Planning, sorting, self-organization, reminders are all skills critical to executive functioning (a psychology jargon term describing these skills). These types of tools and fixes are being used and sought heavily in communities with ADHD, autism-spectrum disorders, mild cognitive impairment, dementia, memory loss, and more. What was a simple life hack for you might turn out to be just what someone else has been looking for. If our brains all worked the same way, we could build one self-organization tool that would work for everyone. Because we are all different, we need many different types of tools, in the hope that one of them will work for that particular person who needs it. At events like this, people who need tools like this might discover people who can build them, or already have.

Or maybe you are someone who has been hacking together bits and pieces of things to track or monitor or solve things for your or a loved one, or is using services like YouTube or Twitter in interesting new ways, but you aren’t sure if we’d like to hear about it. Well, YES! We don’t have unlimited space so we can’t promise a space to everyone with an idea, but we will surely try our best and can’t try unless we hear about what ideas you have.


Sewing

#UMSIMakerfest !!!

You might be surprised to find out that most makerspaces have some sort of sewing equipment and space. And you might not realize that sewing has much to do with health, aside from clinic robes and doctor/nurse uniforms. Well, there is a huge market in adaptive apparel, also called adaptive clothing. That’s just for starters.

Most of the adaptive clothing is focused on practical concerns, and sometimes people want to be attractive, too. There is a lot of room in the space of designing attractive and/or professional clothing that is easy to get in and out of for people with various abilities. The growing awareness of this is evident through recent fashion shows employing models with disabilities, and several projects focused on disability fashion.

Design and disability: fashion for wheelchair users

Disability Fashion: Does this wheelchair make my hips look big? Spinning in style! That’s how we roll …

The Disability Fashion Project

Fashion Without Borders Initiative

Stylishly Impaired — Well-Equipped Crips: disability, pop culture, fashion, technology.

For some people the concern is that they need help from someone else to get dressed, which presents one set of challenges. For other people, they have reduced mobility or strength or an injury, and need alterations to existing garment styles to be able to manage getting dressed on their own. Imagine not being able to get dressed by yourself, and you’ll quickly realize the importance of adaptive clothing for personal independence. I encountered this challenge myself last Fall when I had a shoulder injury. I had such little range of motion with my dominant arm that I could only get dressed with one hand. That meant I needed all front closures for all garments, and all garments needed to be (very) loose-fitting, but not so loose that they wouldn’t stay up. I had some clothes that fit the bill, but not the right mix to make for a practical work week wardrobe.

Whether with a temporary injury or a permanent health condition, the challenges of designing attractive and functional clothes presents some deeply intriguing opportunities for really creative people with some sewing skills. One of the most fascinating examples to me was of a coat for persons in wheelchairs. I was unaware that often they also have problems using their hands. The solution was to sew the coat with ‘mittens’ sewn onto the end of the sleeves, ones that could be zipped up when needed, and when not needed, unzipped and folded back to look like a cuff. How creative!


Wearable Technology

The Mystery of IdentityCool Toys Pic of the Day - Maker Movement Meets HealthcarePic of the day - Wearable Tech at #FoolMoon
Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2013Cool Toys Pic of the Day - Maker Movement Meets HealthcarePebble Pals

The phrase “wearable tech” is fairly new, a few years old, but the idea of it is ancient. Eyeglasses are wearable tech. Slings for broken limbs is wearable tech. So are crutches and canes, in a sense. Wristwatches are, definitely! Now, we have smartwatches to go with our smartphones, and phones are wearable technology! You can add in sensors, like these to track heart beats, relative position, or location. Many folk I know think of wearable tech with GPS (global positioning system) as being for geo-caching games, but it is used possibly almost as much for tracking children or persons with dementia who’ve gone wandering. The possibilities here to connect tech to health and well-being are virtually infinite.


Wood Working

GO-Tech Meeting at Maker Works

Yes, woodworking. Like most of these, this goes two directions. Maybe you’d like to talk about how you designed a lightweight sturdy portable DIY wheelchair curb ramp, or a portable wheelchair ramp for homes. Or an extra gorgeous in home ramp. Or a custom shelving solution for accessing hard-to-reach or heavy items for someone with mobility challenges. Or a wall-mounted flip-up flip-down lockable railing for someone living in a small space with occasional balance issues. Or how you designed an accessible building from the ground up — maybe a “treehouse” or playground for a special kid, or maybe an entire house. Maybe smaller projects. Woodworkers and people working in 3D printing could easily collaborate on sharing or modifying patterns for simple assistive tech. Those assistive tech spoons and grippers being made on 3D printers aren’t terribly sturdy, but if you made them out of wood, they would be both sturdy and beautiful.

On the other hand, maybe you’d like to talk about what modifications and accommodations were needed to make a wood working studio accessible and usable and safe for a person with multiple sclerosis or in a wheelchair. Or what type of modified grippers you used for lathes and die jigs.


MORE!

You can take these ideas a lot further than I have here. Arts and crafts are therapeutic for stress reduction, but also can be used to teach core science and mathematics skills, probably health information and skills, too. Origami concepts have been used widely in health sciences from making more powerful flexible batteries (which could someday be used in bio-implants) to designing anatomical models, to folding of molecular processes and nanostructures. You can even make a microscope with paper crafting, and gaming VR systems! Sustainable gardening and urban foraging connect to public health through addressing diet, nutrition, access to healthy local foods. There are so many ways in which we can use the DIY approach to improve health, for ourselves, for our loved ones, for our community.

GO-Tech Meeting at Maker Works

What if your patient is a self-tracker? — Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of February 17, 2014)

Quantified Self

There were many Twitter tags and events last week that I really wanted to profile (and I hope there is time in the future to come back to some of the others!). The reason this topic won out over the others is because I participated in TWO events that focused on this question! One was the University of Michigan Pediatric Grand Rounds (#umpedsgr), with guest speaker Alex Djuricich, MD.

You can see a Storify of the complete Twitter stream from the talk here: Emerging Technology in Medicine: Friend or Foe?.

Alex launched his presentation with a case study of a young man with high blood pressure who comes to the clinic with his iPhone and app, wanting to share his data on his blood pressure trends.

Alex also got most of the audience livetweeting, which turns out to be what he’s used to at Indiana University, where they’ve livetweeted grand rounds for the past two years at #iupedsgrrounds.

He started with that case, branched out to include some discussion of types of tech that track or capture data about patients, and then swung back to the original case. Here are a few tweets from that talk.

I was absolutely blown away when the same idea came up last night at the weekly #HCSM chat.

This conversation was incredibly powerful. Clinicians and patients going back and forth, examples of data and tools, best practices, and more. These are just a very few of the tweets, with more archived in Symplur.

The conversation continued far past these thoughts, including challenges integrating data into electronic health records, balance between access to data points and ease of use for clinicians, training issues, how to integrate n=1 “trials” with population-based data, and much more. Truly a chat worth reading through in its entirely.


First posted at THL Blog: http://thlibrary.wordpress.com/2014/02/17/what-if-your-patient-is-a-self-tracker-hashtags-of-the-week-hotw-week-of-february-17-2014/

Maker Movement Meets Healthcare

When I try to talk to peers and colleagues about the Maker Movement, one of the questions that keeps coming up over and over is what the heck this has to do with healthcare, and why am I bothering to spend my valuable time with it. So, this post has three examples illustrating the intersection of the Maker Movement with healthcare. Basically, for one of these it’s health literacy education & outreach via hands on geek project, and for the other two, there were real world problems that have expensive, time-consuming or often inaccessible solutions, for which people came up with their own solutions and alternatives. And the solutions are cool, they work, and are usually MUCH cheaper than the official solution you try to get insurance to pay for. Since not everyone has insurance, and not everyone can afford the very best possible care, I see this as a good thing. Make sure you read all the way to the end. This just gets cooler and cooler. There are more, too, this is a very small sampling, just items I stumbled over in the past couple days without even looking for them.

(1)

Have you met Sylvia? Sylvia is twelve years old, is a Maker (I’m guessing her folks probably are also), and has her own series in Make Magazine, with a really cool blog and videos. In this example, she shows people how to build a wearable technology pendant that will sense your heart beat and display the rhythm of your pulse with flashing lights in a necklace.

The Sylvia Show: Lilypad Heartbeat Pendant:
http://sylviashow.com/episodes/s3/e1/mini/pendant

The full post at Make Magazine (Super Awesome Sylvia Builds a Pulse Sensor Pendant)
http://makezine.com/2013/05/28/super-awesome-sylvia-builds-a-pulse-sensor-pendant/

Sylvia’s Super Awesome Mini Maker Show: Make a Heartbeat Pendant:

I confess, at first I thought this seemed kind of staged, but there are enough close ups of her hands actually doing things like soldering, that I decided she really does know how to do the work, even if there might be assistance or advice from others for some parts.

Here’s where you can buy your own PulseSensor (which Sylvia connects to an Arduino for control):
http://pulsesensor.com/

(2)

Here Denver Dias, an undergraduate student in Mumbai India, was working to try to create a walking aid for the blind. Yes, we have walking canes and seeing eye dogs, but this extremely early prototype uses tech to create 3d maps of the surrounding area while walking. The maps are communicated to the user by a combination of tones and vibrations. The tech includes LEDs, sonar, ultrasound, and more.

His blogpost:
Walking aid for the blind – undergrad project…
http://revryl.com/2013/08/10/walking-aid-blind/

Found via Dangerous Prototypes:
http://dangerousprototypes.com/2013/08/12/arduino-based-sensor-shoes-assist-visually-impaired/

(3)

Did you look at this and think it was some fancy looking glove a kid was wearing for a costume? Well, it isn’t. This is a design for kids who, for whatever reason, don’t have fingers. This open-source, freely shared pattern makes it possible for people to create their own prosthetic ‘hand’ with a 3d printer. You can resize it and tweak it. It’s called Robohand. Watch the video if you want to see some awfully happy kids. They are hoping it will also be useful for veterans.

Complete set of mechanical anatomically driven fingershttp://www.thingiverse.com/thing:44150

Updated Robohand design:
http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:92937

MakerBot and Robohand — 3D Printing Mechanical Hands

Via BoingBoing, NPR, and more.

3dPrinter: Donated Makerbot 3D printers accelerate distribution of Robohand mechanical hands
http://www.3dprinter.net/makerbot-3d-printers-accelerate-distribution-of-robohand

BoingBoing: Sponsor shout-out: Makerbot and the Robohand
http://boingboing.net/2013/06/20/sponsor-shout-out-makerbot-an.html

MakerBot: Mechanical Hands From A MakerBot: The Magic Of Robohandhttp://www.makerbot.com/blog/2013/05/07/robohand/

NPR: 3-D Printer Brings Dexterity To Children With No Fingers
http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2013/06/18/191279201/3-d-printer-brings-dexterity-to-children-with-no-fingers

Now, if anyone still thinks that the Maker Movement lacks relevance to healthcare, I’ll go find more, but first stop and think about Jack Andraka, whose recent discovery of innovative technology to diagnose many life-threatening cancers earlier and more cheaply, seem very much in keeping with the philosophy of the Maker Movement.


First posted at CoolToysU:
http://cooltoysu.wordpress.com/2013/08/13/cool-toys-pic-of-the-day-maker-movement-meets-healthcare/

Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Re-)Imagine Science Innovation (Week of July 8, 2013)

This week saw the eleventh annual international celebration of the Imagine Cup in St. Petersburg, Russia. The Imagine Cup is, in their own words, “the world’s premier student technology competition.” The main categories this year included Games, Innovation, and World Citizenship, with most of the health care concepts being presented in this latter category.

This was exciting for more reasons than that Doctor Who, I mean Matt Smith, hosted the final award celebration.

You could think of Imagine Cup as a gigantic real world game for the brightest young folk to share innovation and creativity, rub elbows with some of the smartest and most successful people on earth, and generally bootstrap invention for the next generation.

Here is the youngest competitor, 16 year old Andrey Konovalenko who came up with CamTouch, using visual feeds into a touch device to create an inexpensive portable option that could be useful for data visualization.

And here’s a project that focuses on the issue of honeybee populations world wide, based on strategies for using data analytics. Of course, this approach could have broader applications, especially in health care and public health.

While many projects focused on gaming and technology, it wasn’t unusual for the technology to be applied explicitly in ways that promote health, assist specific populations, or support health care providers and first responders.

So who won? Well, although health innovations didn’t win all the awards, they were certainly well represented.

Imagine Cup 2013 Winners

In the World Citizenship category, the winners were:

3. FoodBank Local (Australia): http://www.imaginecup.com/ic13/team/confufishroyale

2. Omni-Hearing Solution (Taiwan): http://www.imaginecup.com/ic13/team/omnihearingsolution

1! For a Better World (Portugal): http://www.imaginecup.com/ic13/team/forabetterworld

“The idea come from my secundary school with a manual test studied in a subject of laboratory, that consist in a plate test for determining blood type. This test came to me when i was thinking about a possible draft degree and though that it would be great to automate it. How is a rapid test, automated,will possible eliminate human error and in emergency situations could save lives. It was my purpose.

‘We are able to solve a problem of health, saving lives and eliminating the blood transfusion with the principles of the universal donor. With this portable prototype that eliminates travels to the laboratory, earn up time to save lives.’ – Ana Ferraz, Team For a Better World”

There were several healthcare related concepts also in the Innovation Competition.

3. SkyPACS (Thailand): http://www.imaginecup.com/ic13/team/myra

“With SkyPACS, we introduce the simplicity of diagnosis as it turn your tablet into an effective medical image visualisation with the familiar set of diagnosis tools.” – Sikana Tanupabrungsun,Team Myra

2. DORA (Slovenia): http://www.imaginecup.com/ic13/team/dora

“DORA’s goal is to become doctor’s best friend and a vital member of the surgical team. / The results of a preliminary research have shown that the usage of DORA solution would cut down economical costs up to 20%, or ~ 5500 surgeon’s hours (reference hospital UKC Maribor). With its simple use, DORA shortens the duration of surgeries and indirectly affects the environmental and economic aspects of healthcare.” – Kristjan Košic, Team DORA /

Take a closer look at this one, folk, it is really pretty interesting, but too much detail to repost here.

1. SoundSYNK (United Kingdom): http://www.imaginecup.com/ic13/team/colinked

This innovation focuses on the audio system for parties and music performances, so is not as directly relevant to this blog, however, it has implications for education and healthcare. Here is what it does.

“We hope to create a new mesh networking system between smartphones with our technology. Imagine being able to connect a stadium full of people and play music and sounds through all their smartphones at the same time! – Alex Bochenski

OK, now think, what if you could do this for a classroom? What if you could use this technology to sync audio playback devices for people with moderate hearing loss? What if you could extend this technology to sync audio playback to TTC for the deaf? Lots of potential for extending this project into spaces relevant for healthcare and education.

MORE

Website: http://www.imaginecup.com/
Blog: http://www.imaginecup.com/Main/News/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/imaginecup
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/microsoftimaginecup
Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/imaginecup/


First posted at THL Blog: http://thlibrary.wordpress.com/2013/07/12/hashtags-of-the-week-hotw-re-imagine-science-innovation-week-of-july-8-2013/

The Imagine Cup

Day 1 - Imagine Cup 2013 Worldwide Finals

In case you haven’t already heard about it, the Imagine Cup is taking place this week, with a livestream hosted by Microsoft for the final award ceremonies TOMORROW MORNING (i.e. 9:30AM Thursday morning July 11, 2013).

Imagine Cup: http://www.imaginecup.com/

I’m not just excited because Matt Smith, the current Doctor Who, is hosting the awards.


Matt Smith on Imagine Cup 2013: What’s Next?: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k-GQ4h77KVI
Imagine Cup Worldwide Finals with Matt Smith is just the beginning!
http://www.imaginecup.com/main/newsletter#?fbid=F13sydFvnMl

From their About page.
“The Microsoft Imagine Cup is the world’s premier student technology competition. Over the past ten years, more than 1.65 million students from more than 190 countries have participated in the Imagine Cup.”

Last year the awards went to projects like these.

“D Labs allows tutors to understand the behavioral patterns of children with dyslexia by using games to assist them in alphabet identification and movement recognition.”

“Enable Talk was created to give disabled individuals with limited communication abilities a better way to communicate. It transforms sign language into a form of verbal communication by creating a mobile device that continuously recognizes sign language phonemes.”

“WinSenga is a mobile application that aids health workers as they assist expectant mothers. The algorithm analyzes fetal heart sounds to determine the fetal heart rate (beats per minute) and the age and position of the fetus and then records these readings to the cloud”

“Health Buzz is a cost-effective mobile-based solution that helps healthcare service providers access patients’ electronic medical records through a secure cloud-based storage system.”

“StethoCloud is a cloud-powered, mobile-hybrid stethoscope for early detection of pneumonia. By connecting a custom stethoscope to a mobile phone, the user is able to transmit diagnostic information into a cloud service, reproducing the diagnostic capability of a trained medical doctor.”

“nunav is a navigation system with the potential to reduce vehicle carbon emissions by preventing traffic congestion. The system proactively routes city traffic by calculating the best route for each car and communicating that information to each driver.”

Imagine Cup 2012: Imagine Cup Grants Award Winners: http://www.imaginecup.com/IC12/Grants/Winners#?fbid=F13sydFvnMl

Now you see why I’m excited? Incredible tech developments coming from the best and brightest high school students from around the world. Open their doors, open your mind, open the world.

Flickr: Imagine Cup: http://www.flickr.com/photos/imaginecup

TEAMS FROM AROUND THE WORLD

Team Triton, Malaysia Team Omni-Hearing Solution, Taiwan
Team PhAid, Malta Team Qspark, Qatar
Team Kernel, Côte d’Ivoire Team Sano, Canada

PRESENTATIONS

Team Quad Damage presentation
Team vSoft Studio presentation Team Beezinga Presentation
Team MYRA Presentation Team Firebird Presentation
Team Seven Worlds Presentation Team Merado Presentation

ACTIVITIES

Day 1 - Imagine Cup 2013 - Worldwide Finals Day 1 - Imagine Cup 2013 Worldwide Finals
Day 1 - Imagine Cup 2013 - Worldwide Finals Team Combine presentation