Category Archives: Workshops & Presentations

Tactile Graphics, An Introduction

Book Cover, Texture, Quackery All Bricked Up and Nowhere to Go ... Nailed Texture
Texture: Drain Cover Washington, DC: Donkeys: Black & Braille Rough
Montebello: Pottery Texture Woven Sculpture #4 Univ of Mich Binding Imprint

This week I attended a webinar on tactile graphics. Most people I know would say, “Tactile graphics? What does that mean?” So let’s start with that.

In a way, we’ve always had tactile graphics, in the broad sense of pieces designed for visual impact which carry tactile interest or information. Leatherworking often has designs punched into the leather; quipu knotwork carried mathematical data; old books had logos embossed into the covers; pottery might have painted ornaments layered onto the surface which can be felt and distinguished; sculptural shapes might be designed with textures that add layers of insight to the underlying meaning of the work; fabrics can have textures woven into them.

And of course, there’s always Braille, in which embossed or raised dots carry very specific kinds of meaning — words and numbers. In the center of the opening montage is an image of a sculpture of a donkey covered with Braille letters and words. This was a political statue in Washington DC. I don’t know what it says, but I imagine someone with blindness caressing the glossy blackness and curved shapes of the statue, reading the words of the Declaration of Independence, or the statements of the Bill of Rights. Such a powerful metaphor for the idea of tactile graphics. But in another sense, this explanation is a kind of digression, for in the actual world of artists creating art to be touched, the phrase they use is not “tactile graphics” but “tactile art” or “sensational art,” meaning art for senses beyond simply vision and art explicitly designed to be touched. If you are interested in this aspect of tactile artistry and graphics, you might want to be aware of the work of Ann Cunningham, who is a leader in this space.

Ann not only creates artwork that carries dual meaning through combined visual and tactile designs, but is also engaged in how this can carry over to shaping information and making “sensational books.” If you have ever tried to read a plain text (ASCII) version of a heavily illustrated book, in which the images have been redacted since they are not text, you may have some insight into the challenges of reading books while blind. You can read the text, but whenever you reach a place where an image is referenced, you read whatever description was given in the text, but that is usually minimal and refers to the image itself for further insight, and the image is not there. As a sighted person, I often go the the Internet Archive and download both the ASCII version of the book (for speed and portability) and a PDF version (which includes the graphics). I’ll read the ASCII text, and when I become sufficiently frustrated, I will open the PDF online version to see what image they are talking about.

Here is an example of what I mean, a work about Vincent Van Gogh. In the first screenshot, if you are sighted, you will see the title page and opening etching, entitled “Le Semeur.” The image shows a young man in peasant garb, grasping a large bag with his left hand, and making a gesture with his open palmed right hand. Even if you don’t read French, you may be able to guess at the meaning of “Le Semeur,” which is “The Sower.” In the second screenshot, if you are sighted, you will see the same area of the book in the raw text format. Where the image should be, there is nothing but a string of cryptic meaningless computer code, followed by the words, “LE SEMEUR.” There is no indication that you are even missing an image, no clue given as to what content it is that you are missing. Later on in the book, there will be a table listing images in the text, and that may give you a clue, but until you get to that point, you are pretty much lost.

Screenshots illustrating how images "translate" to text in OCR.
Screenshots illustrating how images "translate" to text in OCR.
Van Gogh, par Théodore Duret. Full: https://archive.org/details/vangoghvincent00dureuoft Text only:
https://archive.org/stream/vangoghvincent00dureuoft/vangoghvincent00dureuoft_djvu.txt

So, very broadly then, tactile graphics are graphics which carry meaning through elements that can be touched. More narrowly, the phrase “tactile graphics” has become meaningful as an explicit technique in the creation of accessible information for persons with visual impairment. This is actually closely related to the work being done by Ann Cunningham, since the technologies used function in a similar way, often creating a kind of bas-relief version of an image so that it can be perceived and interpreted by persons who are blind. It is also work that is closely related, conceptually, to Braille, in that it explicitly tries to convert information into a format that can be deciphered by persons with blindness, in this case, visual information.

This can be done with making lines on paper that will puff up so people can feel them. This can be done with special paper, special printers, or special pens. This works fine when the images are linear, but less effective when they are more complex. It can also be done through the techniques mentioned earlier, embossing, embedding, interweaving, etcetera. There are kits, special hardware, a whole variety of technologies being developed around ways to make tactile graphics. All of those approaches tend to be very time-consuming. New technologies being used to create accessible tactile graphics include 3D printing, in which image characteristics are converted to a three-dimensional form and literally converted into a kind of flattened sculptural form of the image. There are some concerns that all the hype around 3D printing will lead to people focusing on that as the ONLY kind of tactile graphic option, which is far from the case, or that people will mistake the conversion of images to 3d format for actually making the images accessible, which may or may not be the case. A particularly eloquent description of this dilemma was posted to Facebook by a teacher of young children with special needs, Yue-Ting Siu.

3D printing and Misappropriation for Tactile Graphics https://www.facebook.com/notes/yue-ting-siu/3d-printing-and-misappropriation-for-tactile-graphics/333500170166311

This was in response to a long conversation around this topic, one for which the entire conversation is well worth digging into.

That’s a very brief introduction into the concept of tactile graphics. I’ll include a few more links at the end if you want to explore more. The webinar from the Diagram Center was very interesting. The webinar, presented by Richard Ladner of the University of Washington, included a solid background in how tactile graphics for accessibility are being created now, some of the technologies, challenges, and solutions. Some of the problems are the time needed to create the tactile graphics, the low resolution of the information, the loss of complexity in the information content, and that certain types of information don’t translate well into current tactile graphic modalities. Then Dr. Ladner described the special problems associated with complex mathematical images and equations, especially those in advance mathematics, physics, and engineering texts. Without access to those images and that content, persons with blindness can be, in essence, excluded from those professions no matter what their actual talents might be. His team has been working on some new approaches to the idea of tactile graphics, creating images that can be read with a smartphone. Wow. Now, this is still fairly early in the development life cycle, but the potential for this new approach is phenomenal.

The Storify (below) includes my notes and links from livetweeting the webinar. The webinar itself, Tactile Graphics with a Voice, will soon be posted on the DIAGRAM site.

Storify: Tactile Graphics With a Voice: https://storify.com/pfanderson/tactile-graphics-with-a-voice


MORE INFORMATION

Tactile Graphics: http://www.tactilegraphics.org/
– Producing Tactile Graphics: http://www.tactilegraphics.org/computerassistedtactiles.html

3D Tactile Graphics: http://3dtactilegraphics.com/

American Foundation for the Blind:
– Basic Principles for Preparing Tactile Graphics http://www.afb.org/info/programs-and-services/professional-development/teachers/tactile-graphics/1235
– Braille Writing Tools and Tools for Tactile Graphics http://www.afb.org/info/living-with-vision-loss/using-technology/reading-and-writing/braille-writing-tools-and-tools-for-tactile-graphics/1235
– Deciding Whether to Create a Tactile Graphic http://www.afb.org/info/programs-and-services/professional-development/solutions-forum/electronic-files-and-research-work-group/deciding-whether-to-create-a-tactile-graphic/12345
– Resources for Preparing Quality Tactile Graphics http://www.afb.org/info/resources-for-preparing-quality-tactile-graphics/5
– Tactile Graphics Course: http://www.afb.org/info/programs-and-services/professional-development/solutions-forum/interested-in-becoming-a-braille-transcriber/tactile-graphics-3016/12345
– Types and Producers of Tactile Graphics http://www.afb.org/info/programs-and-services/professional-development/solutions-forum/training-and-other-needs-work-group/types-and-producers-of-tactile-graphics/12345

American Printing House for the Blind:
– Tactile Graphics Image Library: http://www.aph.org/tgil/
– Tactile Graphics & Manipulatives Available from APH (Missouri School for the Blind: Outreach Services) http://msb.dese.mo.gov/outreach-services/documents/Tactile-Graphics-Products.pdf

UPDATE: MORE RESOURCES FROM THE DIAGRAM CENTER

The DIAGRAM Center: http://diagramcenter.org/
– The Accessible Image Sample Book: http://diagramcenter.org/standards-and-practices/accessible-image-sample-book.html
– Poet Image Description Tool: http://diagramcenter.org/development/poet.html
– Research Reports from DIAGRAM: http://diagramcenter.org/research.html
– Tools from DIAGRAM: http://diagramcenter.org/development.html
– Webinars: http://diagramcenter.org/webinars.html

Systematic Reviews 101

Systematic!!!

This morning in the Emergent Research Series, my colleagues Whitney Townsend and Mark MacEachern presented to a mix of mostly faculty and other librarians about how medical librarians use the systematic review methodology. They did a brilliant job! Very nicely structured, great sources and examples, excellent Q&A session afterwards. They had planned for some activities, but it ended up there wasn’t time. I’d like to know more about what they had planned!

I was one of the folk livetweeting. According to my Twitter metrics, this was a popular topic. I assembled a Storify from the Tweets and related content. I thought it would be of interest to people here.

Storify: PF Anderson: Systematic Reviews 101: https://storify.com/pfanderson/systematic-reviews-101

MedX, and TEDMED, and the Inauguration, Oh, MY!!

MedX, UM Inaugural Symposia, TEDMED

Last week I was privileged to listen in on a press conference for the upcoming TEDMED. Tomorrow is the Symposia for the Inauguration of UM’s new President, Mark S. Schlissel, with Harold Varmus as a guest speaker! Later tomorrow and this weekend, I’ll be watching Stanford’s Medicine X (#MedX) through their Global Access program. Next week the UM Medical School will be hosting a viewing of TEDMED. I feel like I’m swimming in an intellectual biomedical broth!


President Schlissel Inauguration Symposia with Harold Varmus

Inaugural Symposia: Sustaining the Biomedical Research Enterprise and Privacy and Identity in a Hyperconnected Society

HASHTAG: #UMPres14
LIVESTREAM (1): http://umich.edu/watch/
LIVESTREAM (2): http://www.mgoblue.com/collegesportslive/?media=461850

The Inaugural Symposia for President Schissel’s investiture (8:30am ET to 12:00 noon ET) are composed of two very interesting topics and even more interesting collections of speakers. The first part, “Sustaining the Biomedical Research Enterprise,” is the section including the famous Harold Varmus, but also five other notable researchers from on campus, experts in chemistry, genetics/genomics, neuroscience, statistics, and biomedical imaging. (I’m excited that three of the five have expertise related to genomics!)

The focus of the first symposia centers around a recent article from Varmus and colleagues entitled, “Rescuing US biomedical research from its systemic flaws.

The provocative abstract states:

“The long-held but erroneous assumption of never-ending rapid growth in biomedical science has created an unsustainable hypercompetitive system that is discouraging even the most outstanding prospective students from entering our profession—and making it difficult for seasoned investigators to produce their best work. This is a recipe for long-term decline, and the problems cannot be solved with simplistic approaches. Instead, it is time to confront the dangers at hand and rethink some fundamental features of the US biomedical research ecosystem.”

Those three ‘simple’ sentences imply an enormity of challenges which impact both locally and globally. I guarantee it will be fascinating to hear this panel discuss these and brainstorm ways in which the University of Michigan might work towards addressing them here.


Stanford Medicine X

Stanford Medicine X 2014

HASHTAG: #MedX
LIVESTREAM: Available with pre-registration through the MedX Global Access program: http://medicinex.stanford.edu/2014-global-access-program/.

Lucky for me, the Stanford Medicine X event is on the other coast, so our local event will be almost completed when they begin livestreaming at 8AM PT (11AM ET). However, Medicine X conference lasts a solid three days, and includes topics from self-tracking to self-awareness, from entrepreneurship to partnership in design, from compassion to PCORI, from pain to clinical trials to games. It’s intense. A lot of my friends will be there, too many to name, but they include doctors, patients, geeks, and more. MedX is a powerful diverse community, and this is an exciting event.

Schedule: http://medicinex.stanford.edu/2014-schedule/


TEDMED 2014

TEDMED 2014

HASHTAGS: #TEDMED; #TEDMEDlive; #TEDMEDhive; #GreatChallenges.
LIVESTREAMING OPTIONS: http://www.tedmed.com/event/tedmedlive

TEDMED is a little different from the other two events in that it isn’t sponsored through higher education and the livestream isn’t usually free. For folk here in Ann Arbor, there is a way to watch it on campus. What you’ll see if you come includes very little that is expected. Even when someone has a job description that might sound like regular healthcare folk, what they are talking about will probably be a surprise. Beyond the idea of doctor, patient, nurse or neuroscientist, you will also hear comedians, musicians, athletes, bioethicists, military, philosophers, inventors, and more. But what else would you expect, when the theme of the event is “Unlocking Imagination”?

The TEDMED event is a little more complicated than in prior years because they are having presenters and events on both coasts — in Washington DC and in San Francisco. Some parts will overlap. Other parts won’t. You can check out the schedules for both coasts here.

Washington DC Stage Schedule (pdf)

San Francisco CA Stage Schedule (pdf)

To watch locally, details are given below.

Watch the Live Stream of TEDMED Conference, September 10-12

The Medical School will host a live stream from the TEDMED conference, which takes place September 10-12 in Washington DC and San Francisco. The focus of this year’s program is “Unlocking Imagination in Service of Health and Medicine.” Presenters include some of the most respected and undiscovered names in science, journalism, education, business, and technology. Click here to see the conference schedule. Viewing times and locations for watching the live streams are:

Wednesday, September 10: 8am-5pm: University Hospital South (Old Mott) 8th floor lounge
Thursday, September 11: 8am-12pm, 1pm-5pm: University Hospital South (Old Mott) 8th floor lounge
Friday, September 12: 8am-11:30am: University Hospital South (Old Mott) 8409 Conference Room
Friday, September 12: 11:30am-5pm: University Hospital South (Old Mott) 8419 IDTT Collaboration Space

Hero Tales at We #MakeHealth Fest

Reblogged from Health Design By Us



Make Health: Personal Genomics Hero Story http://www.slideshare.net/perplexity/make-health-personal-genomics-hero-story

I was given the honor of closing remarks at the We Make Health Fest, and was pretty nervous about it frankly. I was supposed to do something on personal genomics along with the closing remarks. The very idea made me feel dizzy. I thought about it a lot for weeks without having any ideas I felt good about. One of the ideas was to make the whole thing a poem. Then I thought haiku for each section of the talk. Then I started outlining the talk and realized it sounded kind of like the Joseph Campbell’s hero’s journey, the whole Hero With a Thousand Faces idea. Last summer I was also taking the Coursera MOOC on Fantasy and Science Fiction in which we talked a lot about Propp’s functions of folktales. With all that, I got the idea to tell about personal genomics in my life as a kind of folk tale, and to talk about that experience as a representative process. That was the idea that struck roughly 24 hours before the event started. Oh.

As it turned out, there were so MANY heroes at the We Make Health Fest. So many of them had stories that contained a heroic challenge, a guide, a journey, a transformation, a rescue or solution. This was true from the very first presentation, with Joyce Lee and her son, talking about how they used Youtube to help teach schools how to keep him safe, and how the family worked together to make a large cardboard person to explain their warnings signs. Jane Berliss-Vincent described how an iPad saved a man’s life when he’d given up the will to live. Gary Olthoff made a device that was born out of long visits at hospital bedsides and seeing how nurses struggled with the mattresses. Duane Mackey overcame challenge after challenge in an engrossing story of the process that has culminated in his Open Source Mosquito Trap. The long journey to the stair-climbing wheelchair started young, in early school years, and became a mission. Mike Lee talked about how open teaching and learning resources can change lives in 3rd world countries. Marc Stephens literally transformed his own body through the use quantified self and wearable technology (and more!). Michael Flynn practically juggled the skateboard he was waving around, advocating for new opportunities for physical activities, while the McNaughton-Younger team brought their kids up on stage to help teach challenging concepts of diagnostic tools in surprisingly simple ways. Lia Min told a powerful story of being lost in a grocery story when young, and how sensory challenges can make that a much more confusing and frightening experience, then turning the story and the understanding into a tale for others, through her comic book.

Of course, our keynote speakers were both incredible, and heroes in their own right. Jose Gomez-Marquez explained how medical devices from first world countries fail in 3rd world countries, hidden costs with hidden agendas, and how simple tools and strategies can empower us all. John Costik really reached out and touched the hearts of the audience with his story of his child’s diagnosis with diabetes, how this radically changed their lives, the appearance of experts and guides who helped him along the road to creating the tools that are helping them all feel safer, and being used by so many others.

MakeHealthMontage

It wasn’t just the speakers who were heroes! In the exhibit hall, I was so thrilled to see people from e-NABLE with example Robohands, the open source prosthetic for those who may not be able to afford one. Other 3D printing experts at the event included All Hands Active, Maker Works, and the UM 3D Lab. Brian Zikmund-Fisher demonstrated tools that help people make sense of those confusing and mysterious numbers in research to help people make informed decisions through real understanding. Nanci Nanney lobbied for safe kitchens and restaurants for those with food allergies. Solus created a solution to help people with missing limbs be both more mobile and more comfortable.

We MakeHealth FESTWe MakeHealth FEST

That is just a small, very small, sampling of the heroes who were helping to make health, and who we were privileged to have at our inaugural We #MakeHealth Fest. Over coming weeks we will gradually bring out some of the videos (but it might take a while!). We will try to tell more of the stories, and introduce more of the people. If you were there, think about sharing a blogpost or tweet about what meant the most to you from the We #MakeHealth Fest.

Designing Health, Making Health

Reblogged from Health Design By Us.

Health Design By Use

You may have noticed that the We Make Health Fest is sponsored by the Health Design By Us collaborative, of which Joyce Lee is the PI and I am a team member. So what is the connection, at least for us, between health design and making health? A good topic for the final post before the big event. For me, personally, my awareness of the intimate role of design in health began with doorknobs.

Doorknobs and Door Handles

Well, actually it came in the 80s when I was lucky enough to attend a presentation by Don Norman. (Yes, THAT Don Norman.) In the presentation I saw Don described what he called “The Pyschology of Everyday Things (POET).” I would have loved the talk for the name alone, but there was so much more. One of the first things Don did was to put up a whole series of slides of pictures of doorknobs and door handles, then talk about how the door tells us we should open it. He pointed out doors that don’t tell us, or confuse us; doors which seem to say ‘push’ when you need to pull and ‘pull’ when you ought to push. He showed us doors that can only be opened with two hands, with one hand, doors that want you to be righthanded or lefthanded, doors that can’t be opened at all if you are in a wheelchair, and then he showed us doors designed so well that you can open them without hands at all.

When you look at the intersection of the maker movement and healthcare, a great deal of the creativity is focused on solving problems like doorknobs. Problems that began with design that didn’t go as far as it might to include the people actually using whatever it is. With the maker movement, people might say, “Dagnabbit, why didn’t they make it THIS way?!” And then they remake it the way it should have been made in the first place. Or, if they can’t remake it themselves, they look for someone who can. Just last week

Patients think about things like this. A lot! And parents of kids. And the public.

Joyce thinks about things like this, too. (It’s part of what I love about working with her — her insight, caring, enthusiasm, excitement, energy, and her fabulous sense of humor.)

What it really takes, though, is partnerships, collaborations, people talking to other people, people who know that other people are out there interested and working on the same challenges. When Joyce has one of her design thinking workshops with a group of people, she’s encouraging them to think about the topic together, to imagine a better world, to work in teams, to leverage the insights and knowledge of one with the skills and talents of another (and then to switch places, so everyone is using insights and talents!).

Tim Brown says “design thinking” is a combination of what’s desirable, viable, and feasible. Reuven Cohen gives several overviews in Forbes, of which one says it is intelligence gathering, design, and choice, while another says the process stages are: Empathize, Define, Ideate, Prototype, Test. Wikipedia says “design thinking” is a combination of empathy, creativity, and rationality.

I like that so many of those definitions are rooted in empathy. Makers and inventors are excited by interesting problems. (So are researchers, of course.) In healthcare, there is an infinity of interesting problems. But it isn’t just about interesting problems, it’s about caring and need, that’s what starts people working on a problem. Given two equally interesting problems, the one with the greatest need, and the greatest need for heart, is the one that will get the most excitement.

In the maker community, a lot of what helps move things along is also about sharing, working together, sharing ideas and problems, digging around to find a solution. It is invention through flow (rather than by committee). When makers get together to work on a project they also brainstorm and share insights and ideas and resources. Then they go back to the drawing board until they get stuck. The ideas move from person to person, flowing around challenges (lack of resources, lack of skills) much like water flows around rocks in a stream.

Sometimes the flow moves from the person with the idea to someone with the expertise. A lot of the time, it isn’t that simple, and it flows back and forth. Having the idea is itself a kind of expertise. If we want real innovation in healthcare, we need more perspectives, more voices, more sources of imagination and creativity, skillsets that perhaps have not been traditionally valued in healthcare settings. And we have to listen, try to understand what the ideas are, where they are coming from.

With the We Make Health Fest, we’re hoping those different perspectives, voices, views, will meet, and discover each other. And then, maybe, just maybe, some of them will start something new.

“The call to care suggests a possible primary design position. … We might start from the assumption that, as designers, we do not know (yet) how the values of care are being lived and acted upon. We must interpret without (yet) being expert.” Jones PH. Design for care: innovating healthcare experience. Brooklyn, NY: Rosenfeld Media, (c)2013, p.xviii. https://rosenfeldmedia.com/books/design-for-care/

Maybe none of us are experts. Maybe all of us are experts. Maybe the kinds of expertise that will change healthcare the ways that are most needed are kinds of expertise we don’t even know how to recognize yet. But this is how we start finding out.


This was the last post before the big event on Saturday! Come to the We Make Health Fest on August 16th, 2014 in Palmer Commons at the University of Michigan or follow hashtag #makehealth on Twitter! Please follow @MakeHealthUM and @healthbyus on Twitter and please sign up for our mailing list so that you can join and contribute!

“There’s Magic Everywhere”: The #MakeHealth Exhibitors

Reposted from Health Design By Us

We Make Health Fest (University of Michigan)

The exhibits for the We Make Health Fest are visual, active, hands-on. We are hoping the exhibitors will show you how to do things yourself, discuss tips, tricks, strategies. So, for this blogpost, to try to replicate that sense of physical engagement in a virtual environment, the information about the exhibitors isn’t in a list studded with occasional pictures. Nope, it’s almost all pictures, in a slideshow you can click through yourself, at your own pace. Take a look, browse, think about which ones you want most to visit. And enjoy!

Who Is Making Health Here? #makehealth

Reposted from Health Design By Us: Who is Making Health Here? #makehealth; Find out about the health-makers you’ll meet on Saturday!


We Make Health Fest (University of Michigan)

When we started planning this, more than once Joyce told me, “Hey, I’ll be happy if five people show up.” Well, we did a lot of talking, had a lot of meetings, asked people to spread the word, and … the resulting response has been beyond our WILDEST dreams! Since this is our first time, we wanted to keep this as open as possible, and create as many opportunities for people to be involved as we could. Exhibitors are timesharing booths and tables. Speakers are doing mostly pecha kucha style 5-minute presentations. We didn’t want to say “no” to anyone! So if you say you’re a maker and wanted to be involved, we did our darnedest to try to fit you in somewhere. So who all will you find if you come? Here’s how you find out.

On our website: http://makehealth.us/

Direct link to the full speaker and exhibitor schedule as a downloadable PDF: http://bit.ly/MakeHealthFestSpeakers

We also are in the process of adding the schedule into Lanyrd.

Lanyrd: We Make Health Fest: Schedule

Lanyrd has an app, if you want to use it during the event.

Lanyrd apps: Android | iPhone | Mobile Web | Open Web

Or you can simply read on!

SPEAKERS

10:30am Joyce Lee / Welcome
10:35am Jose Gomez-Marquez / Keynote
11:05am John Costik / Keynote: Hacking Diabetes
11:35am Andrew Maynard / Color My Poop Beautiful, and Other Tales of Tech Derring Do
11:55 Makers the Movie
1:05pm Matt Christensen / Linnetic: A Better Way to Monitor Asthma
1:10pm Nanci and Eilah Nanney / GREAT Gluten-Free Kitchens!
1:15pm Marc Stephens / Tech-Savvy Fitness
1:25pm Jane Berliss-Vincent / The iPad as Resuscitation Device: Notes on Assistive Tech in the Hospital Environment
1:35pm Linda Diane Feldt / There is a Free Lunch: Wildcrafting and Foraging for Food and Medicine
1:45pm Kris Kullgren / Mott Kids4Kids: Utilizing Peer Education Videos at Bedside and Beyond
1:55pm Amer Abughaida / A Manual Stair-Climbing Wheelchair
2:00pm Duane Mackey / Open Source Mosquito Trap
2:05pm Brandon McNaughton / Kitchen-Table Diagnostics with Glass Microbubbles
2:10pm James Rampton / Learning Health System – Consumer Application
2:20pm Irene Knokh / Free Educational Resources: MERLOT and beyond!
2:25pm Mike Lee / Demonstration of World Possible’s Remote Areas Community Hotspots for Education and Learning (RACHEL) Project
2:35pm Sandy Merkel / The Poke Program
2:45pm Harpreet Singh / Communication Box: Flip the Health Care Culture by T.R.U.M.P. Technique
2:55pm Michael Flynn / Fostering a sense of community in hospital lobbies with interactive public art
3:00pm Gary Olthoff / EZCarryBed Mattress Carrier Handle
3:05pm George Albercook / DIY Hearing Aids – A Model MakeHealth
3:15pm Pete Wendel / Games and User Interface Design: Thinking Differently to Affect Elderly Quality of Life
3:25pm Lia Min / In My Spectrum: A Comic about Autism Desktop
3:35pm Shawn O’Grady / 3D Printing and Rapid Prototyping
3:40pm George Albercook / Makers Answer the Call
3:45pm AJ Montpetit / Disrupting Health Care
3:55pm PF Anderson / Personalized Genomics and Closing Remarks

EXHIBITORS

10am – 12pm
IconArray.com: A Free Generator of Health Risk Graphics
Linnetic: A Better Way to Monitor Asthma
Type 1 Diabetes

10am – 1pm
Building Capacity for the Ann Arbor Sharing Economy
National Foundation for Celiac Awareness — GREAT Kitchens!
We Make Health Stories

10am – 2pm
Cardboard Challenge: #makehealth
Kitchen-Table Diagnostics with Glass Microbubbles

10am – 3pm
The Poke Program

11am – 12pm
Free Educational Resources: MERLOT and Beyond

12pm – 2pm
A Manual Stair-Climbing Wheelchair
Demonstration of World Possible’s Remote Areas Community Hotspots for Education and Learning (RACHEL) Project
Hacking Diabetes
Learning Health System – Consumer Application

1pm – 4pm
Michigan Engineered for All Libes (M-HEAL)

2pm – 4pm
Open Source Mosquito Trap