Molecular Biology & Genomics SIG Meeting #mlanet15

Part 1 of a series of blogposts I wrote for the recent Annual Meeting of the Medical Library Association.


MolBio & Genomics SIG #mlanet15

I’m trying to track what’s going on with emerging technologies, new tools, new-to-me tools, and so forth. I’m not an official member of the MolBioGen SIG, but I wish I was (especially since personal genomics is one of my hobbies). I learned so much at their meeting Monday morning. The best part was the Round Table, where they each talked about who they are, what they do, what’s new at their place. Now, this was exciting! They talked about many tools they seemed to all know and take for granted, and I’ll share some of those later. They also had so many exciting and creative ideas for how to engage their target audiences, types of classes that are most effective, crowdsourcing instruction from within the audience, strategic partnerships that make a difference, strategies for point-of-care genomics, and so much more.

Here are the tools that I found most interesting.

PhenoTips
PhenoTips

Reactome
Reactome

Online Bioinformatics Resource Collection
Bioinformatics MOOCs Example

Galaxy Project
Galaxy

Open Helix
OpenHelix
(Note: These folk are in the Exhibit Hall, if you haven’t seen them yet.)

BioStars
BioStars

GenePool
GenePool

Data Carpentry
Data Carpentry

Project Hydra
Hydra

Fedora
Fedora

NCBI: Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO)
GEO (Gene Expression Omnibus)

Complete Genome: Public Genome Data
Complete Genomics Public Data

NYU Data Catalog
NYU Data Catalog

Want more? Check out the Storify!

Emerging Tech, Healthcare & Comics for World Book Day #WorldBookDay

Bedroom Books, Unread, Part 1

One book, two books,
Red books, blue books,
Fat books, thin books,
Old books, new books.
This one has a gold leaf spine,
This one sings a little rhyme.
I could read books all the time!
(a Dr. Seuss parody by yours truly)

Let’s just say I sometimes WISH I could read books all the time. And a great deal of my house looks like the photo. For today, World Book Day, I want to just mention a few (a VERY few) books I’ve been reading lately which may be of interest to readers of this blog.

First off, some that connect directly to healthcare social media, emerging technologies, accessibility, disability, and health literacy — some of my favorite topics!


Digital Humanitarians
Digital Humanitarians, by Patrick Meier: http://www.digital-humanitarians.com/

I love the #SMEM community and #SMEMchat. SMEM stands for Social Media Emergency Management. Think of it as how we use social media for disaster and crisis response. I’ve touched on these topics here before, and will again. When I saw that a book had come out specifically on this, I was delighted. And it had even more — the roles of open data, open source software and tools, citizen science, and crowdsourcing. So HUGELY exciting. I couldn’t wait for the library to get a copy, I had to borrow it interlibrary loan. Then I listened to the webinar with Patrick, hosted by NNLM. Then I didn’t want to give back the copy I’d borrowed, so I had to buy a copy. And then I made SURE the library bought a copy. Well worth reading, in case you haven’t guessed.


Digital Outcasts
Digital Outcasts: Moving Technology Forward Without Leaving People Behind, by Kel Smith: http://digital-outcasts.com/

I’ve been raving about Kel Smith’s book, Digital Outcasts. Kel does a brilliant job of not just look backwards at the intersection of disability, accessibility, and technology, but looking forward. He forecasts new technologies arising and some of the new ways in which they will create barriers to access for people. This one the library has, and they have it electronically.


Conquering Concussion
Conquering Concussion: Healing TBI Symptoms With Neurofeedback and Without Drugs, by Mary Lee Esty & C. M. Shifflett: http://conqueringconcussion.net/

Another one I bought for my own collection is Conquering Concussion, which got a rave review from Kirkus and then was listed as one of the top indie published books of 2014. Let’s just say that I have had enough concussions of my own for this to be personally relevant. Then it turned out that the authors are friends of a friend. Small world. Good book.


The Guide to the Future of Medicine: Technology AND The Human Touch
The Guide to the Future of Medicine: Technology AND The Human Touch, by Bertalan Mesko: http://themedicalfuturist.com/

Berci and I have known each other through social media since he was a med student. And now he’s NOT a medical student anymore, is a world recognized expert on emerging technologies and social media use in healthcare, a highly sought after public speaker, and he writes books. This one I bought as an e-book, because I wanted to highlight like crazy, and be able to download all my highlights in a nice tidy lump (something made much easier by reading the book on a Kindle!).


Last but not least, I’m brainstorming how we might make a webcomic about health literacy skills. Sounds like a really boring topic, eh? But the books I’m reading to do research on the idea are anything but boring.

Wrinkle in Time, Graphic Novel
A Wrinkle in Time, a Graphic Novel, by Madeleine L’Engle and Hope Larson: http://www.hopelarson.com/portfolio-item/a-wrinkle-intime/

This one isn’t remotely medical. Instead, it’s a book I’ve read over and over throughout my life, for which I own multiple editions in various formats, and Hope Larson went and turned it into a graphic novel (ie. comic book). You would not believe how much trouble I’ve had wrapping my head around how to tell a story in a comic. It’s not like I don’t read comics. It’s more like, well, brain freeze. This book got me over the first hurdle. Because I know the book so well in other forms, I could more easily understand how the story changed and stayed the same as it morphed into a more visual format.

On Purpose
On Purpose, by Vic Strecher: http://www.dungbeetle.org/

I’ve known Vic Strecher professionally for many years, probably almost as long as I’ve been working here at the University of Michigan. When I heard that Vic’s daughter had died it was like a punch in the gut, even though I’d never met her. I couldn’t imagine. I’m a mom, and there is no more terrifying thought than that something like this might happen to one of my kids. When Vic wrote a comic book about his experience, and how this became, for him, an opportunity for personal growth, I had to get a copy. And this book is what helped me see how a personal story can become a universal story. Seeing how this transformed into a comic book / graphic novel helped me to see opportunities in my own life for stories that could possibly be transformed into comics.

Oh Joy, Sex Toy (review)
Comic Reviews: Oh Joy, Sex Toy (by PF Anderson) http://www.graphicmedicine.org/comic-reviews/oh-joy-sex-toy-2/

Last month I was asked to review a copy of Erika Moen’s new nicer-than-average comic book on sex toys and sex education. You know. Oh Joy, Sex Toy? Trust me, most of the college age folk already know about it.

Erika Moen
Erika Moen

You can read my review for the basics about the book (which is printed with nice ink on absolutely gorgeous paper, if you’re into that sort of thing). For me, the most exciting part of the book was in the appendix, where Erika did a funny little comic about one day in her life, sketching one panel for each hour. LIGHTBULB! Now, I can see how all the pieces fit together: comic formatting, personal experience, and story telling. Next, I’m hoping to find time to actually make one. I’m nervous. Wish me luck! And inspiration!

Happy National DNA Day!

Here are some things I’ve stumbled on recently that I think might make playing with DNA more fun or interesting, and help integrate the process of learning about our own personal DNA more relevant to our own personal health. Good stuff, eh?

Genes for Good
Genes For Good
http://genesforgood.sph.umich.edu/

“Participants in Genes for Good have a unique opportunity to learn about their health, behavior, and ancestors. Any information you provide to the study is yours to visualize using plotting tools available in the App itself. If you like, you can also download the information. After all, it’s your information and you should be able to do with it what you wish.”

Open Human
Open Humans
https://www.openhumans.org/

“Open Humans helps you connect to exciting and innovative research studies – and gives you access to the data they produce from you.
– find exciting studies to join
– access to your raw data
– share your data with others
– connect with other members
– let others see your contribution to science!”

NOTE: They are partners with the Personal Genome Project AND American Gut!

Apple ResearchKit
Apple Research Kit
http://www.apple.com/researchkit

“Until now, taking part in a medical study has usually required traveling to a hospital or facility to complete tasks and fill out questionnaires. With ResearchKit, you can use your iPhone to perform activities and generate data wherever you are, providing a source of information that is more objective than ever possible before. This is invaluable to the progress of medical research — and we can all have a hand in it.
What’s more, many of the apps built with ResearchKit will enable you to track your own data and potentially discover correlations between symptoms and daily actions such as diet or exercise.”

Apple Health Kit
Apple Health Kit
https://www.apple.com/ios/whats-new/health/

“The new Health app gives you an easy‑to‑read dashboard of your health and fitness data. And we’ve created a new tool for developers called HealthKit, which allows all the incredible health and fitness apps to work together, and work harder, for you. It just might be the beginning of a health revolution.”

Panometer (we're measuring everything)
Panometer
http://panometer.org/index.html

The Panometer is at this moment, vaporware, but I went to a presentation with the inventor and heard what he’s imagining. It’s pretty exciting. So, what if we could measure, link, and visualize in a meaningful way, our genetic data, our environment (exposome), our experience, our health metrics, our behavior, and our social streams in a way that is both private and persona, creating tools that help us make informed decisions about our lives and how to make them better and more personally satisfying? Doesn’t the idea make you feel happy?

Hedonometer
Hedonometer
http://www.hedonometer.org

Blue is for Borgs (On WAAD), Let’s Walk in Red Instead

Borg cyborg prosthetics Walk In Red

It happens every year now. I end up having a gentle, delicate but firm conversation with someone (individual or organizational representative) who really, REALLY want to do something to be supportive and help people with autism, and to do so they have jumped on the bandwagon of the “Light it up Blue” movement founded by Autism Speaks. They mean well, but they don’t realize the broader context.

BLUE = Autism Speaks

World Autism Awareness/Acceptance Day
World Autism Awareness/Acceptance Day

When the context is provided, they either say, “I didn’t know,” or “Don’t we get brownie points for good intentions?” or “Well, it might mean that for you, but not for us,” or “That’s only true in America,” or “It’s too late, we already committed.” The folk who say, “I didn’t know” are usually actually listening, and will make a change in the future. I’m not so sure about the others. I’ve written letters to companies that are “going blue” and collecting funds to donate, trying to make them more deeply aware of the impact. There are companies where I no longer shop, and have told them why. Not that it really has any significant impact, from what I can tell. And I’m afraid that each complaint, like this one, ends up instead feeding the adoption of the campaign, creating free publicity, and feeding negative messages about autism that lie at the heart of what Autism Speaks does.

Here let me explain. Briefly.

SELECTIVE TIMELINE OF AUTISM RIGHTS MOVEMENT

1970 – April chosen as National Autism Awareness Month in the United States by the Autism Society.
1995 – First Autreat, November.
2002 – Autism Awareness Year in the United Kingdom
2002 – Autism Sunday, second Sunday of February, launched in London
2005 – First Autistic Pride Day, June 18th, in Brasil with the theme “Acceptance not cure”
2005 – First Autscape began July 26, near Somerset, UK
2006 – Autism Acceptance Project founded by Estée Klar
2007 – World Autism Day designated by the United Nations
2008 – First World Autism Day, April 2
2010 – First Light It Up Blue (#LIUB) Campaign launched by Autism Speaks
2011 – Autism Acceptance Day created by Paula Durbin Westby
2015 – First Walk in Red campaign (supported by Paula Durbin Westby).

Walk In Red

You see that autism advocacy has a long and strong history, before and after the first efforts by Autism Speaks. What has happened with the Autism Speaks efforts is basically that they have, well, co-opted the idea of the World Autism Day for awareness and fundraising of their own projects. I’m serious. Here, look at some definitions of the word “co-opt.”

Free Dictionary: co-opt
“1. to choose as a member.
2. to assimilate or win over into a larger group.
3. to appropriate as one’s own; preempt.”
“3. To take or assume for one’s own use; appropriate: co-opted the criticism by embracing it.
4. To neutralize or win over (an independent minority, for example) through assimilation into an established group or culture: co-opt rebels by giving them positions of authority.”

Merriam-Webster: co-opt
“: to cause or force (someone or something) to become part of your group, movement, etc.
: to use or take control of (something) for your own purposes”
“2 a : to take into a group (as a faction, movement, or culture) : absorb, assimilate
b : take over, appropriate (a style co–opted by advertisers)”

Autism Speaks have a LOT of money behind them, connected with a lot of famous folk, and have built that into such a strong brand recognition that when you search for Autism Day in Google, you have to actually scroll way down to find the links to the United Nations, the folk who are REALLY behind it. All of the top leading links about it are for Autism Speaks and their fundraising efforts.

Google Search: Autism Day

Whoa. And again, WHOA. And the whole thing with “Blue”? That was to match the Autism Speaks logo. Yes really. So, even if people aren’t aware of it, even if they’ve forgotten, every time someone connects “blue” with “autism” they are creating more support and awareness for the organization Autism Speaks, their fundraising campaigns, their marketing, and their agendas.

Is that such a bad thing? After all, they are a charity, and the money still all goes to support people with autism, right? Wrong.

Not to say that Autism Speaks do nothing worthwhile (some of their Toolkits are genuinely useful), it is the organization’s underlying tenants are viewed with alarm within the larger autism advocacy community, who don’t necessarily have the millions of dollars to get eyes on their ideas. Here is a tiny selection illustrating some of those concerns.

Autistic Self Advocacy Network (ASAN): 2014 Joint Letter to the Sponsors of Autism Speaks

John Elder Robison: I resign my roles at Autism Speaks

ASAN Vancouver Disability Day of Mourning: Introductory Speech

Forbes: Why Autism Speaks Doesn’t Speak For Me

The Daily Beast: “Autism Speaks”- but Should Everyone Listen?

Boycott Autism Speaks

Autism Women’s Network: Is Autism Speaks a Hate Group?

The controversial and contentious dialog seems to center on these issues.

Awareness versus Acceptance

Awareness vs Pride

Assimilation versus Inclusion

Stigma versus Respect

Now, let me go back to the beginning of this post. The Borg. What the community of autism advocates is seeking is to celebrate their skills, talents, uniqueness. The United Nations theme for World Autism Day this year focuses on the value of persons with autism as employees (click on the word “inclusion” above). This has also been celebrated recently by the Wall Street Journal and Entrepreneur. In its long history, the autism advocacy movement quickly shifted from simple “awareness” to more active and joyful celebrations of the value of persons with autism. I’ve been tracking the Autism Speaks controversy for a very long time. I don’t need to explain here how what they do tends instead to undermine those happier and loftier goals.

I do have a personal stake in this. My son has autism. My brother has autism. There are some who think I have autism and was just never diagnosed. I wouldn’t be surprised. Last time I was home, I rescued this beautiful piece of blown glass made by my autistic brother, who was preparing to discard it as not meeting his standards. It wasn’t good enough. I love it, treasure it, and keep it in my office where I see it everyday.

Blown Glass (discard)

Also last time I was home, the pastor of my brother’s church made a point of telling me how important and highly valued he is in their faith community. I don’t want to hear anyone tell either my brother or my son that they aren’t good enough, or that they need to be assimilated. I have many friends who are on the autism spectrum. Some of them are even non-verbal, with what is considered severe autism. I tell you, when my friend who is non-verbal is complaining on Twitter about something her husband said to her, knowing that she couldn’t argue back … well, let’s just say, I don’t think of her as being non-verbal.

What is it that we want of people with autism? Do we want to treasure them and celebrate their uniqueness? Or …

“We are the Borg. Lower your shields and surrender your ships. We will add your biological and technological distinctiveness to our own. Your culture will adapt to service us. Resistance is futile. … You will be assimilated.”

If you still think of “blue” as the color of autism, you may not even be aware how it happened, but you have already been assimilated.

MORE ON THE RHETORIC OF AUTISM

Paul Heilker and Melanie Yergeau. Autism and Rhetoric. College English 2011 73(5):485-497. http://www.jstor.org/stable/23052337?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents

Autism and Rhetoric (a Prezi synthesizing the high points of the Heiler & Yergeau article).
https://prezi.com/kz2mvlhp-7gz/autism-and-rhetoric/

Alicia A. Broderick. Autism as Rhetoric: Exploring Watershed Rhetorical Moments in Applied Behavior Analysis Discourse. Disability Studies Quarterly 2011 31(3). http://dsq-sds.org/article/view/1674/1597

Paul Heilker. Autism, Rhetoric, and Whiteness. Disability Studies Quarterly 2012 32(4). http://dsq-sds.org/article/view/1756/3181

Emily Malabey. How the Rhetoric of Autism Speaks Has Hurt Autistic People. Council for Autism and Neurodiversity November 15, 2013. http://www.autismcouncil.org/?p=2802

PF Anderson. Beyond “Light it Up Blue” — Maybe “Light it up Gold”! https://etechlib.wordpress.com/2014/04/02/beyond-light-it-up-blue-maybe-light-it-up-gold/
(Check out the Storify of Ibby Grace presenting on this)

Choosing a Tablet Computer for the Elderly & Technophobic

Grandpa

From the “Drafts Pile” post, some folk commented and others emailed, but this was the most requested topic, which made it top of my list for writing the next blog post.

INTRODUCTION

It wasn’t that long ago that we were picking out a tablet for my dad. Back in the day, my dad was a hard core computer geek — programmer, hacker, build-your-own. My childhood was chockfull of tickertape and punchcards and Tandy home computer kits being assembled in the basement. My dad was anything but technophobic, but even for him the new world of the Web was confusing. I remember when he and I were talking on the phone, and he was having a small rant about how he and his tech cronies at the local college had spent hours trying to figure out how to download an image from a web page. They were SO frustrated (this was about 10 years ago). I said, “What?! Right click didn’t work?” and he replied, “Right click? What are you talking about?” I suddenly realized that I had outstripped my father in the realm of technology. I think it was quite a shock for both of us.

When I heard that my dad was still trying to get by using a >10 year old Windows machine, flatbed scanner, and a 2400 baud modem, my heart ached. We kids talked it over and went together to get him and iPad. Why an iPad? Mostly because that’s what other folk in the family had already, and there was built in family assistance for him if he needed help. Not to mention, I could also add the charge for his Internet access to my account, and he never needed to worry about it. But that was us, and that was a few years back.

I cannot imagine how much MORE frustrating and intimidating it must be for people who were never strong with “The Force” when it comes to computers. In my family now, I am the tech wizard and my (ahem, adult) children are the ones who come to me with questions about how to do things. And I go to my geek-squad friends and sister when I get stuck with mobile tech. And someday, I will be like my dad, uncertain in the face of tech that has evolved so quickly it has outstripped my ability to keep up. What are the options now for you and your loved ones?

BACKGROUND

Being a senior doesn’t mean you are technophobic, being a technophobe doesn’t mean you are a senior, and you can still have challenges with technology without falling into either group. In addition to the elderly, there are others, such as children or persons with certain disabilities, who benefit from making tech simpler to use, more self-explanatory, and more durable. Ultimately, making computers easier to use benefits EVERYONE, just like curbcuts for wheelchairs help bicyclists and parent pushing strollers. That’s how accessibility works. What’s important is to not assume that “they can’t do it”, or it can’t be done. Everyday we make progress making computers better, stronger, faster, smarter, and, yes, EASIER. So, while this post focuses on the motivating idea of elderly folk who are struggling with computers, don’t limit your ideas of who might be helped to just those groups.

Seniors and Technology

The Pew Internet Research Center has been tracking how seniors use and work with the Internet since 2001, when only 15% were online (my early adopter dad being one). Now, 14 years later, it’s roughly 60%, and even within those seniors who use the Internet, there is a lot of variation in how well they are able to use it.

“Two different groups of older Americans emerge. The first group (which leans toward younger, more highly educated, or more affluent seniors) has relatively substantial technology assets, and also has a positive view toward the benefits of online platforms. The other (which tends to be older and less affluent, often with significant challenges with health or disability) is largely disconnected from the world of digital tools and services, both physically and psychologically.” Pew. “Older Adults and Technology Use,” 2014.

These two groups aren’t necessarily stable, either. People shift between them. Fifteen years ago, my dad fell into the first group of tech-savvy elders. By the time of his passing, earlier this month, he had shifted largely into the second category, but still wanted to check his email. For others, it might be that a new treatment, supportive living situation, or even a techy gift might actually bring someone MORE into the realm of using the technologies around them. While I was traveling home from my Dad’s funeral, an older woman stopped me in the waiting room at Union Station. Her 82-year-old boyfriend (her words) had given her an iPhone, and her girlfriend was texting her, but she didn’t know how to read or answer the texts. Our conversation ended with, ” … and when it turns green, that means it’s been sent? Oh, thank you!”

Technophobia

Technophobia is a far more important concern than simply one’s age. The fear of the technology can be isolating, keeping people apart from loved ones and friends when this is how they communicate and connect. This is such a problem, that people are actually building tech solutions to address such very specific issues such as sharing baby pictures on Facebook, and how do you include family members who are not ON Facebook? [Check out Kidpost, if you have this challenge in your family.] AARP recommended the Presto Printing Mailbox for seniors without a computer, allowing friends, relatives, and caregivers to send anything from family photos to medication reminders. AARP went on to fund a major white paper on the topic, Connected Living for Social Aging: Designing Technology for All (2011).

The phrase “digital isolation” has been adopted to describe this as a significant social issue within society, with titles like “Digital Isolation Plagues Those Who Need Internet Most” and “What Will Become of Britain’s Digitally Isolated After Martha Lane Fox’s Resignation?” Digital isolation is blamed as a contributing factor to poor outcomes in disaster response and health (especially in diabetes). The origins of technophobia may or may not lie in the technology itself, but the impacts are surely heavily social in nature.

“… rarely, if ever, is technophobia based just on the happenstance of technical ignorance. It almost always has its roots in … a sense of estrangement from the world into which one is cast. Here common sense cannot help, for it is from the prevaling common sense that one is estranged. To the technophobe, the technological world seems alien; to common sense, the technophobe seems foolish.” Burch, Robert. Confronting Technophobia: A Topology. Phenomenology + Pedagogy 1986 4(2):3-21. https://ejournals.library.ualberta.ca/index.php/pandp/article/download/15013/11834

Solutions to technophobia need incorporate that social aspect of the presumed problem. Sarah Maurer recommends that technophobes can get past the fear by starting slowly, taking a class, try a touch screen, get the same types of devices your relatives are using, and ask your kids and grandkids to help you learn your way around.

Maurer, Sarah. 10 Tips to Beat Technophobia: Seniors can conquer their fears and start enjoying online technology. WCCTA WebsiteCompass Spring 2012.

The National Legal Aid and Defender Association recommended in 2004 that you start out by playing Solitaire, using cheatsheets, and don’t make the mistake of asking a true geek for help (because they may not be the best communicators). They also recommended “reverse mentoring,” where you learn something and then teach it to someone else who knows even less. These are still good idea, although some folk might prefer to replace Solitaire with Candy Crush or Trivia Crack or one of the other hot new games.

NLADA. Overcoming Technophobia

More

If you are interested in tracking this area, I have two recommendations. One is Senior Tech Insider, a truly marvelous news tracking service from Karen Heyman which shares news and alerts about telemedicine, accessibility, policy and regulatory issues, and emerging technologies that touch on the lives of the elderly. The other is a counter to the argument I hear so often of, “I’m too old to try.” Me, I’m only approaching 60, so perhaps I’m not a persuasive case. So check out John F. McMullen, who is older than me. I’m not sure how much, but I know he was around for many of the tech events that shaped my youth, and he was tied right into them, knows the folk involved, and still writes about them and how the issues have progressed over time. He’s everywhere online (blogs, BlogTalkRadio, Facebook, Flickr, Google Plus, LinkedIn, OpenSalon, Podbean, Twitter, Youtube, …). He is enormously more engaged in multimedia production than I am. And he still writes and talks about technology. Never say it can’t be done. Heck, did you hear the one about the 114 year old woman who couldn’t register for Facebook because their age verification form didn’t go that far? It’s true.

TECH OPTIONS

So, even with recognizing there are some pretty significant social aspects to working with a loved one to help them get online, and assuming that they don’t have a philosophical opposition to the very concept and are willing to try, what happens next? Where do you go, what factors are most important in your decision, what are the choices? Do you go with a ASUS VivoTab, RealPad, In-Touch, iPad, Kindle Fire, or … what?

COMPARISONS & SELECTION CRITERIA

Checklist

COSTS
– Device Price
– Network Access (is included, or is extra?)
– Monthly fees?
– Carrying case or protection (optional)
– External keyboard (optional)
– Security or registration (optional)
– Training or courses (optional)
– Tech support (included or optional extra?)
HARDWARE OPTIONS
– Display (resolution, crispness, color, screen size, enlargement, zoom, etc.)
– Buttons (size, visibility, clarity of purposes)
– Keyboard (built-in, optional add on, external, on-screen, in-case, …)
– Battery life
– Wall or plug-in charger
– Weight
– Memory card slot (optional)
SPECIAL & PERSONAL FACTORS
– Tech Support available, what kind, does it match person’s preferences?
– Interface & appearance
– Accessibility & font enlargement
– Background Skills
– Special health concerns that may impact on how device is used
– Apps available for personal interests
– Apps available for hobbies & games
– Apps available for special health needs or tracking

More resources

For Dummies: For Seniors: Buying the Right Tablet: http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/for-seniors-buying-the-right-tablet.html

My Ageing Parent: Computers or tablets for older people? http://www.myageingparent.com/computers-or-tablets-which-are-better-for-older-people/

My Ageing Parent: Are there better tablets for elderly than iPad? http://www.myageingparent.com/better-tablet-ipad-elderly/

New York Public Library: Tablet Buying Guide: A Primer for Technophobes, Luddites and the Just Plain Confused (2013) http://www.nypl.org/blog/2013/12/20/tablet-buying-guide

Senior Planet: The Best Tablets for Technophobes (2014) http://seniorplanet.org/the-best-tablets-for-technophobes/

TechRiggs: Best Tablets for Seniors and Elderly Senior Citizens (2015) http://www.techriggs.com/best-tablets-for-seniors-and-elderly-senior-citizens/

HARDWARE OPTIONS

These are currently the best known and available tablet computers which were either designed explicitly for seniors or which are being promoted as useful for that demographic. Several of these were designed in collaboration with seniors, such as the AARP RealPad and the Senior Touchpad. Some of these have been around a while and have a lot of pre-existing support resources, like the iPad, Chromebook, and Kindle. Others are brand new, like the GrandPad, just announced in February 2015.

MORE:

Best Tablets for Seniors and Elderly Senior Citizens http://www.techriggs.com/best-tablets-for-seniors-and-elderly-senior-citizens/

Don’t waste your money on AARP’s RealPad http://www.modern-senior.com/dont-waste-money-aarps-realpad/

Great deals on tablets for seniors: http://www.modern-senior.com/great-deals-tablets-seniors/

In My “Drafts” Pile

M-BLEM Workshop at UMich

This winter has been a rough one for my family. Lots of family crises, illness, injury, etcetera. What that means is that the blog slows down, projects slow down, I get way (WAY) behind on things I wanted to do and wanted to share. In the past month, my collection of unfinished (“draft”) blog posts has exploded. What normally happens then, is that I actually finish a couple that someone asked for, whatever else is most fresh in my mind, and the rest never happen. I thought it was about time to give folk a chance to comment on what they want, so that I do write up things people have asked about. Also, several of these were planned to be brief expansions of Storifys or Slideshare decks that I made or found and wanted to share, so for those, I’ll just put links in for now, and will expand on them later, maybe, if you ask.

#a2wiad – Ann Arbor’s Stake in World Information Architecture Day

Anonymous Social Media Overview, Part Four: More on Risks, Opportunities, Benefits, Ethics

Biobanks & Biobanking

Comics & Healthcare

Cool Toys U: September 2014 Notes

Cool Toys U: October 2014 Notes

Designing a Tablet Computer for the Elderly & Technophobic

Design plus Business [NOTE: There is a LOT more I need to add into this story! Cool stuff!]

#HCSMCA on “Is Academic Peer Review a Dead Man Walking?”

Infographic of the Week: Public Attitudes to Science 2014

“Live Long & Prosper”: Can Emotional Intelligence Be Taught? #HCLDR [NOTE: Linked is Joyce’s Storify on this, but I wanted to do one with a different focus]

MBLEM Workshop

MEDLIBS on the Horizon Report 2015

My Physical Therapy & My Tech

Peer-to-Peer Sex Education in Social Media & Games

Phoebe Gloeckner

Random Round-up: Cool Things Tech is Doing with Poop

Report Out: The Happiness, Health, and Stories of Populations (#umcscs)

Selecting Online Resources for MOOCs

Sexpertise 2015

Should She? Or Shouldn’t She? Sharing YOUR Pics

Strategies for Better Science Blogging, Part 2

Symposium: Thirty Years of “Thinking Sex”

Hashtags of the World (HOTW): #WhatIfResearchKit / What If Research Kit … ?

Apple ResearchKit
Apple ResearchKit: https://www.apple.com/researchkit/
ResearchKit for Developers: https://developer.apple.com/researchkit/

Last week, while I was deep in the throes of a family crisis, Apple announced “ResearchKit.” I noticed it, but obviously had no time to do anything with it. I’m looking forward to exploring that. I mean, really, it’s getting a ton of press!

9to5Mac: ResearchKit did in 24 hours what would normally take 50 medical centers a year – Stanford University

Bloomberg Business: Thousands Have Already Signed Up for Apple’s ResearchKit

CNBC: Apple’s ResearchKit: Gamechanger for digital health care?

Forbes: Apple’s Open-Source ‘ResearchKit’ And The Future Of Medical Research

MacWorld: First medical apps built with Apple’s ResearchKit won’t share data for commercial gain

MacWorld: Stanford’s ResearchKit app gained more users in 24 hours than most medical studies find in a year

TechCrunch: ResearchKit An “Enormous Opportunity” For Science, Says Breast Cancer Charity

TedBlog: mPowering the Apple ResearchKit: How Max Little put a Parkinson’s app on the iPhone

TheVerge: Apple’s new ResearchKit: ‘Ethics quagmire’ or medical research aid?

TheVerge: Apple’s new ResearchKit lets iPhone users participate in clinical trials; It could help researchers recruit from more diverse populations

Wired: Apple’s ResearchKit is a New Way to do Medical Research

Here is what Apple and it’s current group of partners are envisioning for how ResearchKit might be used. It sounds pretty inspiring already, with a nod to some of the complicated ethical and privacy issues poised to emerge.


ResearchKit – how iPhone is transforming medical research https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VyY2qPb6c0c

In the meantime, several of my friends and colleagues on Twitter have begun discussion their visions for what could be done with ResearchKit. This group includes patients as well as researchers, and this, I suspect is the demographic, the community creating collaborations where the most profound and productive changes will be found. Here’s what they are saying, so far. Why don’t you join in?

Why stop there? What other possibilities could come from widespread adoption and use of ResearchKit?

#WhatIfResearchKit helped monitor the progression of Alzheimer’s Disease. Like a more official version of what was seen in ‘Still Alice’?

#WhatIfResearchKit helped improve treatment and intervention for depression through passive activity tracking?

#WhatIfResearchKit apps were developed in collaboration with the patient community? If these apps aren’t used, there’s no data to analyze.

What if Apple released a tool so anyone could make a #ResearchKit connected app. True citizen science. #WhatIfResearchKit

What if a community of translator helped translate #ResearchKit studies and consent information into other languages. #WhatIfResearchKit

#WhatIfResearchKit was rolled into the #PrecisionMedicine initiative and the NIH took a more open-source mentality to data collection.

That #WhatIfResearchKit already exists recalls @rufuspollock: “The best thing to do with your #data will be thought of by someone else.”

#WhatIfResearchKit tracked child development so that children with autism could be diagnosed quicker and provided with skills

Catching up on two rich threads: #bcsm + #WhatifResearchKit Who says we can’t cry and laugh and hope and rage all at the same time?

#WhatIfResearchKit was a cross-platform non-profit initiative partnering together device manufacturers to better healthcare? #DigitalHealth

“The key to understanding #health & disease is research & data.” Check out @AppIeOfflciaI’s #WhatIfResearchKit: http://apple.co/1FFSLR8

#WhatIfResearchKit JMIR will built a Healthbook app which randomizes participants to #mhealth apps #megatrial with 700 million participants

Healthbook http://www.healthbook.com/ will use #researchkit and also support n-of-1 trials to evaluate #mhealth apps #WhatIfResearchKit

What if all the people who are “healthy” (for now) could contribute their data as controls? #WhatIfResearchKit

#WhatIfResearchKit had an opt-in for every human, to proxy any slice of my data to #opensource science. +audit-trail

#WhatIfResearchKit was my life baseline, always collecting data when I’m healthy, so when I’m sick, the record is computable + comparable.

#WhatIfResearchKit was available on android platforms to ensure more socioeconomic, racial and ethnic diversity of participants

#WhatIfResearchKit flipped the paradigm community based studies studying access to care, how tertiary care centers impact POC communities

What if Apple made a dashboard so that we could all see enrollment numbers for #ResearchKit apps (in real time)? #WhatIfResearchKit

Reporters: If you are writing about #ResearchKit check out the ideas being shared here: #WhatIfResearchKit (and interview those innovators)

#WhatIfResearchKit – A story in 140 character bursts of hope https://storify.com/iamspartacus/whatifresearchkit … via @iam_spartacus