Tag Archives: cooltoys

Teach Feast: Engaged Learning Through Internships, Badges, e-Portfolios, & Storytelling


Teach Feast 2015: integrative tools for engagement at Michigan http://www.slideshare.net/umhealthscienceslibraries/teach-feast-2015-integrative-tools-for-engagement-at-michigan

I was invited as a last minute fill-in to be part of a panel at the annual Teach Feast festival of learning technologies at the University of Michigan. It was a great learning experience for me, and I hope also for the participants. I learned more about how engaged learning can be a continuum, incorporating relatively small or subtle changes to traditional instruction or going whole hog and literally uprooting a student from their culture and context and positioning them in a new space for a different type of learning experience. Engagement can originate with either student or teacher (or both); it can be collaborative and/or competitive and/or creative. The one part that seemed foundational to all the strategies was reflection, turning your gaze both inward and outward.

My part was on digital storytelling. I’m a big fan of digital storytelling, in case you didn’t know. I like to test new online storytelling tools, and see how they work to support different kinds of stories. My current fascination with comics is based out of my larger enthusiasm for storytelling. I argue that storytelling is part of every academic discipline. It’s obvious that the humanities dissolve if you remove stories. What is history without story? But when it comes to the sciences, people are more likely to have trouble seeing the story as part of the academic process. Of course, case studies in health care, sure, those are stories. And psychology and psychiatry, they don’t work without stories. Social work, yeah, of course. But physics? And engineering? Maybe if you aren’t in the field you have trouble seeing the story, but if you really think about every research paper, every structured abstract is a frame for a story. Every piece of science has a backstory, a motivation, a reason someone wanted to know THIS. Even mathematics. Even when camouflaged, the stories of science are implied. What changes isn’t the presence of the story, but how we tell them, and the tools we use to carry them.

The advantages of digital storytelling are similar to those of printed stories: portable, inclusive, persistent, and reaching a broader audience. One of the great lessons from education is that communication is never one-size-fits-all. The more ways you present important content, the more people will be able to understand it and engage with it. The greater the variety of media you use to tell a story, the more people will hear it. I’m happy to help people find and tell stories, especially science stories. There are a lot of different types of tools and resources in the slides. If I have time, I’ll spend a little more time on specific ones here some other time. If there is something in particular from the slides that you’d like me to talk about, say so in the comments, and I’ll make it a priority.

Advertisements

Anonymous Social Media Overview, Part Two: Selected Anonymous Social Tools

Anonymous Social Media Overview

I find it a little ironic that the big blowup with Whisper happened this week, while I’m in the middle of this series about anonymous apps (Part 1). Oh, you didn’t hear about that? Well, the gist of it is if you think you’re anonymous, you’re not; if you think they aren’t tracking you, they are; and that the only place that really destroys your usage information completely after you’re done is probably your public library, and even that is becoming iffy. But that is a topic probably best suited for the NEXT post in this series, since the conversation around the exposé is still expanding dramatically. Here’s just the intro piece.

Paul Lewis and Dominic Rushe. Revealed: how Whisper app tracks ‘anonymous’ users. The Guardian Thursday 16 October 2014 11.35 EDT. http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/oct/16/-sp-revealed-whisper-app-tracking-users

What I wanted to do in this post was simply walk through a quick introduction to some of the more prominent tools and services in the anonymous social media space. What has struck me is that while many of these are general, others target fairly specific audiences, such as high school students with YikYak, youth with Snapchat, and corporate with Confide.

TOOLS & SERVICES

Cloaq http://www.cloaq.co

Confide https://getconfide.com

Ello https://ello.co/beta-public-profiles

Peek https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/peek-for-iphone/id722634039?mt=8

Peek In Too http://www.peekintoo.com

PostSecret http://postsecret.com

Rumr http://rumrapp.com

Secret https://www.secret.ly

Six Billion Secrets http://www.sixbillionsecrets.com/top
Six Billion Secrets on Tumblr http://sixbillionsecrets.tumblr.com
Six Billion Secrets on Twitter https://twitter.com/6BillionSecrets

Snapchat https://www.snapchat.com

Sneeky http://www.sneekyapp.com

Social Number http://socialnumber.com

Spraffl http://www.spraffl.com

Spring (formerly Formspring) http://new.spring.me/

StreetChat http://www.streetchatapp.com

Tumblr https://www.tumblr.com/

Whisper http://whisper.sh

Wut http://www.wutwut.com

YikYak http://www.yikyakapp.com

Common Problems in Systematic Review Searches: Right Side Truncation? NOT! (A PreziTube Test)


Common Problems in Systematic Review Searches: Right Side Truncation? NOT! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WMLiozo-lwg

A couple days ago, I was offered a coupon / voucher to test PreziTube. PreziTube is a tool that automatically exports your Prezi presentation to a Youtube video format, both downloadable and with the option of automatically uploading to Youtube. For this test, the automatic upload option ended up in their Youtube account, not mine, and I am not sure if there is an option to work around that if you pay for the privilege.

Playing with Prezitube & iMovie
PreziTube: http://prezitube.com/

Now, I’ve had issues for a LOOOONG time with the lack of accessibility in Prezi. This seemed like a tool that might help with some portion of that process, so I was interested. Definitely interested.

I went to Prezi to find whichever of my Prezi presentations is the most popular. Ah, yes, one on systematic review searching and truncation.

Systematic Review Searching: Right-Side Truncation? NOT! http://prezi.com/77qy3sfhq_tv/systematic-review-searching-right-side-truncation-not/

I put in the link and the voucher code and gave it a try.

Playing with Prezitube & iMovie

Prezitube offers a variety of timing options, but the assumption is that each “slide” within the Prezi will receive the same length of time. Since this presentation was rather text heavy, and I wasn’t sure just how long these times, I went for the middle. The range offered is from 4 to 30, and for this video I chose 15.

I downloaded the video, wished I had an audio voiceover, but didn’t want to take the time, so I just grabbed some amusing-to-me public domain audio from the Internet Archive, and spliced that in with iMovie. I have access to other video editing tools, but I wanted to see what could be done with virtually no resources.

Playing with Prezitube & iMovie

And the link to the audio track used.

Kay Kyser – Some Day I’ll Find You 1937 (posted as “Kay Kaiser&kollegeOf MusicalKnowkege10f2”) https://archive.org/details/KayKaiserkollegeofMusicalknowkege10f2

Now, this took almost no time at all. It probably took me about a half hour to make the video. It took me about 2 hours to upload it to Youtube, because Youtube was being glitchy that day. Not great, but absolutely worth a half hour of my time.

Now, do I want to do this for more Prezis? The free version gives you tiny videos and you can’t download. For $6.99 you may download and get high resolution videos, with support if something goes wrong. Hmmm, maybe, maybe. Maybe next time, I’ll do the systematic review Prezi on phrase searching.

Systematic Review Searching: Word Order in Phrase Searching http://prezi.com/vrzaimpaignp/systematic-review-searching-word-order-in-phrase-searching/

Infographic of the Week: HHS Infographics Collection!

HHS Infographics on Flickr
Flickr: Group: HHS Infographics: https://www.flickr.com/groups/hhsinfographics/

I just discovered a Flickr group that collects infographics from the US Department of Health and Human Services. WOW. Talk about a great resource! There are many infographics in the collection, and also marketing images for specific health challenges or initiatives.

HHS Infographics on Flickr

This isn’t all they have, though! You can many of these in sets or albums from the HHSgov Flickr Stream.

Flickr: HHS: Sets: Health Care Infographics: https://www.flickr.com/photos/hhsgov/sets/72157633968047018/

Flickr: HHS: Sets: HHS Infographics: https://www.flickr.com/photos/hhsgov/sets/72157632180365890/

Now, it is completely wonderful to have a one stop shop to go hunt health infographics from a reliable source and of known high quality. Extremely useful! But this is even better than that. Because these are in a Flickr Group, there are many other things you can do.

If you have a Flickr account, you can request to join to track the images that appear in the group, or you can use the RSS feed from the group in your feed reader.

You could set up a computer display in a public area, and start the “slideshow” view from the group as a way to engage the public around quality health information.

Because these are licensed as “United States government work,” you can download these, re-use them, post them yourself, put them on your website, edit and modify them. As they say:

Anyone may, without restriction under U.S. copyright laws:
* reproduce the work in print or digital form;
* create derivative works;
* perform the work publicly;
* display the work;
* distribute copies or digitally transfer the work to the public by sale or other transfer of ownership, or by rental, lease, or lending.

Niiiiiice.

However, because these are in Flickr, the absolute easiest way to share them is to just embed them on your webpage or site, or share the link wherever you wish. Here’s an example.

Recently, I’ve been seeing many conversations on social media, on Twitter, Facebook, and in blogs, about issues with patients access to their electronic health record and problems with the accuracy of the information in their record. Right now, this is again a timely issue. The HHS has a series of four short infographics on exactly this topic. I can choose one or any or all and, with a Flickr account, grab the embed code to put them in this blogpost without having to download or upload or rename or identify or worry about the accessibility of the code. Here’s what it looks like.

Know Your HIPAA Rights #1Know Your HIPAA Rights #2
Know Your HIPAA Rights #3Know Your HIPAA Rights #4

If someone clicks on any of the four images above, it will take them to the original image, in a larger size. The source is right there, and I didn’t have to do the work. So very helpful. I love this resource. So glad I found them!

Every Day In Many Ways: Solving “Wicked Problems” at the University of Michigan

Horizon Report 2014 Trends & Challenges
Horizon Report 2014: http://www.nmc.org/publications/2014-horizon-report-higher-ed

The past couple months, the Cool Toys Conversations group has been discussing the Horizon Report, as we do every year. This year we decided the collection of technologies was perhaps not as interesting as the trends and challenges they identified (screenshot above).

Yesterday, over the lunch hour, the group became particularly interested in the wicked problem of “Keeping Education Relevant.” There was a lot of good conversation, and I unfortunately did not take notes, so I am going to trust my memory (HAH!). The gist of it was encapsulated in a couple points. David Crandall pointed out that there is a strong relationship between the so-called solvable challenges and the so-called wicked (or unsolvable) challenges, with the hint that perhaps solving the solvable challenges might actually take us a long way towards solving the unsolvable challenges. (Yes, it’s ok to giggle – that’s a lot of the same word.)

Next was the observation that “Keeping Education Relevant” is distinct from keeping learning relevant, since learning is ALWAYS relevant. So the question is less about how to keep learning relevant, but more about how to position the kind of education that happens in higher education as an active participant in the broad open amorphous space that is comprised of all those glorious online and offline social learning spaces that people love so much.

Last but not least was the interjection that, Hello! Maybe it isn’t so unsolvable after all, since so many folk here are already doing such exciting things to position us, as academics, in ways to show relevance to the public and to engage with the public. Actually, I suspect that all major universities are engaged in similar kinds of activities, and working hard to make clear the ways in which academia is not only relevant, but makes possible research and learning opportunities that benefit the broader communities and which would not be possible or practical in other types of spaces and structures.

Here are just a very FEW examples of activities around campus that are, frankly, not atypical and which illustrate ways in which we are making academia relevant here, every day, as a routine part of business.

UMSI MAKERFEST

#UMSIMakerfest !!! | #UMSIMakerfest !!!
#UMSIMakerfest !!! | #UMSIMakerfest !!!

Today, the School of Information had a Makerfest in the Union. As you can see from the poster, they had a lot of cool stuff going on, from Google Glass and Rasperry Pi to video games and cookies. Among their partners for this event were multiple community makerspaces, both the campus and local public library, individuals with special talents or resources, and of course, campus groups. Was the audience just college students? No way! Students were there, but also parents and kids, teachers, staff, community, and I don’t know who else.

#UMSIMakerfest: https://www.flickr.com/photos/rosefirerising/sets/72157642967068393

TEDXUOFM

DSC_0149 | IMG_6735
3O5A9174_Kimwall | TEDxUofM
IMG_5416 | eak.FEA.TEDxUofM.4-8-11.044.

A couple weeks ago (less, actually), the campus had our TEDx event (TEDxUofM). TEDx events are gatherings of fascinating people sharing innovative and creative ideas. They are spinoffs from the large TED organization where TED stands for Technology Entertainment and Design. My brain keeps trying to change the “E” to “Education”, since that’s what my brain associates with the TED videos, but when you think about it, “Education” and “Entertainment” are pretty closely related in many important ways.

With our local TEDxUofM event, it ALWAYS is highlighting topics that connect academia and the real world, projects that make a difference in the lives of real people, stories that touch hearts and lives. It doesn’t accomplish this by just making a forum for faculty to preach to the choir, but by giving prominence to projects by students and alumni as well, and by getting faculty to talk about their passions beyond their official job duties. In this sense it is like most other TED and TEDx events. Here, of course, the event connects the campus and the town and community. There isn’t just one TEDx event locally, but several — TEDxDetroit, TEDxUofM, TEDxEMU, TEDxSkylineHS, TEDxArb, TEDxYouth@AnnArbor, TEDxUMDearborn, and probably more I haven’t covered/discovered. TEDx events are partnerships with the community, ways to bring information out of ivory towers and into public spaces. They engage, emote, intrigue, and inspire. They foster awareness, and through awareness future collaborations.

RISK BITES

In Andrew Maynard’s recent presentation, “Should Academics Get Down and Dirty with Youtube?,” he illustrated the power of Youtube to reach the public, to educate, to inform, and to potentially inform policy and decisionmakers. This insight of his was reinforced by President Obama’s recruitment of video bloggers (vloggers) with strong reach among the youth audience in order to disseminate critical information about the Obamacare registration deadlines.

Andrew highlighted a number of influential vloggers who present content on science and research, but who are not themselves from academia, then asking what is it that they are doing that we are not? Why is it that the general public obviously have a passion for information about science, but find science information more persuasive when presented by someone who is not a scientist? What are we not doing that we should be or could be doing? These questions are what inspired him to create the Risk Bites series of science videos, in which he endeavors to position academic and heavily evidence-based science information in a public space in a way that will hopefully reach those who need the information. Here is the most recent video from that series as an example.


What’s the difference between hazard and risk? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_GwVTdsnN1E

ROAD SCHOLARS

Goodwill-Industries | Chateau-Chantal
Cascade-Engineering | Discussion-with-legislators

The University of Michigan Road Scholars program has been going on for DECADES. The idea was, yet again, how to make academia relevant to the communities in which we find ourselves. More than that, it was how to create bridges, connections, and partnerships between the University and the people of our state. In the Road Scholars program, faculty travel the state on a kind of pilgrimage to various communities around Michigan, developing a genuine and personal connection to the people and places, learning about the initiatives and work that is done around the state, and fostering opportunities for outreach, partnerships, mutual regard and learning.

GHANA EMERGENCY MEDICINE COLLABORATIVE
D80_35
Ghana-Michigan Conference Nov 2009 023 | Ghana-Michigan Conference Nov 2009 024
D80_30

The Ghana Emergency Medicine Collaborative is another project that has been going on for a while. These images are from an early event in 2009 which laid some of the groundwork for this collaboration between the University and medical programs in Ghana. The collaboration involves individuals from both schools going to the other country to learn more about needs, resources, and opportunities. This innovative partnership drove much of the initial development of the University’s creation of open education resources, and has proven to have a large and lasting impact far beyond the original scope of the project.

CLOSING THOUGHTS

Are you here at the University of Michigan? Are you interested in a campus-wide conversation about barriers to innovation in education and what we are already doing to solve these problems? Do you know of some amazing work people are doing to help keep us relevant? Please add your thoughts in the comments.

BioRxiv: A Preprint Archive for the Life Sciences

BioRxiv

I just found out that some of my friends had not yet heard about BioRxiv, the preprint archive for the biological and life science which was launched by Cold Spring Harbor Press last November.

What is the idea behind it? They released a great video yesterday to explain it.


bioRxiv The Preprint Server for Biology https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EwAMtT3ZIpg

The buzz has reached such influential journals as SCIENCE and NATURE, so you know they are legitimate. This is how they describe themselves.

“bioRxiv (pronounced “bio-archive”) is a free online archive and distribution service for unpublished preprints in the life sciences. It is operated by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, a not-for-profit research and educational institution. By posting preprints on bioRxiv, authors are able to make their findings immediately available to the scientific community and receive feedback on draft manuscripts before they are submitted to journals.”

Jon Wilkins gives excellent reasons for participating in his blogpost on Lost in Transcription: open access, speed, normalization, feedback, and “the left side of history.”

Five Reasons Biologists Should Use Preprint Servers http://jonfwilkins.com/2013/11/five-reasons-biologists-should-use-preprint-servers/

I’d also argue that getting your work out in public view under your own name helps to define your claim to the work, and gives you preemptive identification with the concepts. Not to mention that visibility can lead to or support publication (and there is the absolutely delicious feeling that comes when an editor sees the preprint and asks you to submit your article to their journal).

Just to make it even better, bioRxiv readership and use are included in altmetrics.

This might just make an interesting expansion upon placing your work in Deep Blue, and could also help fulfill some grant requirements for placing work in spaces accessible to the public. Issues to ponder.


First posted at THL Blog: http://thlibrary.wordpress.com/2014/03/19/biorxiv-a-preprint-archive-for-the-life-sciences/