Tag Archives: makehealth

#MakeHealth RETURNS!

Make Health Fest 2015

We are gearing up for this year’s repeat of the fantastic Make Health event, a maker event themed around healthcare.

Make Health Fest: http://makehealth.us/
(Pssst! Check out #MakeHealth on Twitter)

This year (THIS WEEKEND!!), MakeHealth is a two-day event, with presentations split onto two different days, and booths and demos on Sunday. Check the schedule carefully to not miss something you want to see.

FESTIVAL: Make Health Fest: 11 am – 6 pm, Sunday, October 25th, 2015
SYMPOSIUM: The Nightscout Project, Patient-Driven Innovation, & the Maker Movement: 9:30 am – 12 pm, Monday, October 26th, 2015

This year we have been recruiting some awesome campus and community partners (and the list is still growing!). We are also seeking volunteers of all sorts (and you can volunteer to help at the website). We ESPECIALLY need people to do social media stuff, write up the event wherever you post, livetweet presentations and displays, take pics, help us make the event come alive for those who can’t get here. And if anyone is able and willing to livestream or Periscope, that is another thing we’d love to do (and get requests for) but which hasn’t happened yet. People who volunteer officially get cool swag, so it’s worth signing up as well as just doing it!

If you ARE a presenter, feel free to recruit one of your friends to videotape you and put it up online, but being sensitive to those in the audience who may be less thrilled about being on camera.

We are really excited about this year’s highlights and keynotes:

Susannah Fox was the health lead at the Pew Internet and American Life Project, and is now Chief Technology Officer of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Whoa. Susannah’s ideas of what qualifies as technology tend toward the broad side. That broad definition makes it easier for her to be absolutely as excited about what makers and real people are doing as much so (if not more) than what professional geeks are doing.

We also have Jose Gomez-Marquez, Director, MIT Little Devices Lab, and Anna Young of Maker Nurse. More information forthcoming about presentations on the patient-led movement to overhaul life with diabetes (a.k.a. the NightScout Project), which you may have noticed under the hashtags #WeAreNotWaiting, #CGMinTheCloud, #DIYPS, #NightScout, #OpenAPS, and probably more.

It promises to be a fantastic event, and we would love your help and participation. If you want to take a look at just how fantastic it was last year, you can do that here.

We #MakeHealth Fest 2014: http://makehealth.us/2014

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In My “Drafts” Pile

M-BLEM Workshop at UMich

This winter has been a rough one for my family. Lots of family crises, illness, injury, etcetera. What that means is that the blog slows down, projects slow down, I get way (WAY) behind on things I wanted to do and wanted to share. In the past month, my collection of unfinished (“draft”) blog posts has exploded. What normally happens then, is that I actually finish a couple that someone asked for, whatever else is most fresh in my mind, and the rest never happen. I thought it was about time to give folk a chance to comment on what they want, so that I do write up things people have asked about. Also, several of these were planned to be brief expansions of Storifys or Slideshare decks that I made or found and wanted to share, so for those, I’ll just put links in for now, and will expand on them later, maybe, if you ask.

#a2wiad – Ann Arbor’s Stake in World Information Architecture Day

Anonymous Social Media Overview, Part Four: More on Risks, Opportunities, Benefits, Ethics

Biobanks & Biobanking

Comics & Healthcare

Cool Toys U: September 2014 Notes

Cool Toys U: October 2014 Notes

Designing a Tablet Computer for the Elderly & Technophobic

Design plus Business [NOTE: There is a LOT more I need to add into this story! Cool stuff!]

#HCSMCA on “Is Academic Peer Review a Dead Man Walking?”

Infographic of the Week: Public Attitudes to Science 2014

“Live Long & Prosper”: Can Emotional Intelligence Be Taught? #HCLDR [NOTE: Linked is Joyce’s Storify on this, but I wanted to do one with a different focus]

MBLEM Workshop

MEDLIBS on the Horizon Report 2015

My Physical Therapy & My Tech

Peer-to-Peer Sex Education in Social Media & Games

Phoebe Gloeckner

Random Round-up: Cool Things Tech is Doing with Poop

Report Out: The Happiness, Health, and Stories of Populations (#umcscs)

Selecting Online Resources for MOOCs

Sexpertise 2015

Should She? Or Shouldn’t She? Sharing YOUR Pics

Strategies for Better Science Blogging, Part 2

Symposium: Thirty Years of “Thinking Sex”

Ebola and Emerging Technologies

Ebola & Emerging Tech

Ebola & Emerging Tech: http://www.mindmeister.com/485610588/ebola-emerging-tech

Our local Cool Toys Conversations group had asked to have a discussion of emerging technologies and Ebola, and “could we please have it before the holidays when everyone will be traveling?” I had tried to get this up early last week, but life happened, and so it is coming to you now.

When we started looking at this topic I was surprised to find so much! I probably shouldn’t have been — Ebola is big news. It seems as if everyone doing anything in tech and emerging tech is doing something interesting related to Ebola. Well, except Apple. And that surprised me, too. There were so many links, so many topics, I could have EASILY done a month of daily blogposts just on this topic. Once we started, we kept finding more. The collection of links was getting overblown, random, chaotic, confusing. I decided to organize them all in a mindmap, and doing that took a while. Mindmeister kept saying, “Too many topics at one level!” This is why it is broken down into 4 section, but don’t take those sections too seriously. They are more an artifact of the process than seriously meaningful. Each major topic probably has minor topics and links that could easily belong in another section. For that reason, I thought it might be helpful to give an alphabetic list here of what’s included in the mindmap (which is also where you’ll find all the actual links – hint? Click on the little arrows).

I have so many favorite projects and resources I can’t possibly highlight them all. If life and time permit, I’ll try to throw together a slideshow with screenshots of some of them. Just as teasers, here are just a … a smidgen, a teeny tiny sampling. Tim Unwin wrote a great overview of exciting ways in which emerging technologies are being used in the Ebola crisis. Biosensors, wearable tech, open everything, code repositories, data, genetics, DIYbio, mapping and tracking, apps (tons of them), reverse innovation, open source pharma, gaming, cryogenics, … the list goes on and on. You already know how completely enchanted I am with the maker movement right now, and this is no exception. Makers Against Ebola designed flash sensors and proximity alarms to help prevent contamination while working with patients, pull tabs and zipper extenders to make it easier to get in and out of the Personal Protective Environments (which you might recognize better as hazmat suits). The DIY Ebola Challenge came up with a great variety of open source hardware solutions for scientific equipment, in efforts to design a kit they couple bundle and share at point of need. So far they have centrifuges in all sizes, PCR thermocycler, gel electrophoresis, spectrometers, multichannel pipettes, and more. Other folk are using tools like the Raspberry Pi and Beaglebone Black to design inexpensive syringe pumps and diagnostics. And then there’s robots! Robots to decontaminate, robots to intercede between people and create a distance than may contain the disease (like a social firebreak). The ways in which people are using tech to highlight the personal aspect is also awe-inspiring. From citizen journalism to ebola MOOCs to the WAYout Ebola Song, with every social media tool you can name, someone is doing something to try to help share important stories and information. There is a lot more in the mindmap, with links for everything. There’s even a section on open access images about Ebola to use foe teaching, training, and education. Check it out — here’s an outline.

GENERAL

Articles
Collections

PEOPLE DRIVEN

Advocacy
Citizen Science
Citizen Journalism
Collaboration Tech
Communication (Challenges: Misinformation & Hype, Stigma, Weaponized; Solutions: Education & Training, Ebola Information, MOOCs, Information & Health Literacy, Wikipedia
Social Media
Research
Crowdfunding
Crowdsourcing (Challenges)
Makers & DIY
Open (Open Access, Open Images, Open Data, Open Government, Open IBM, Open Source Code Repositories, Open Source Pharma, Open Sources Wearables)
Reverse Innovation

SCIENCE DRIVEN

Arxiv/bioRxiv
Biohacking / DIYbio / SynBio
Data (Data modeling, Data visualization
Open Data
Diagnostics
Genetics
Mapping / Tracking
Nanosilver
NASA

TECH DRIVEN

3D Printing
Apps
Biosensors
Biotech
DARPA
Biocontainment
Cryogenics
Diagnosis
Gaming
Geolocation / Geotagging / GPS
Hackers
IBM
Mobile
Robotics (Asepsis, Telepresence)
Telemedicine
Wearable Tech (Biocontainment, Personal Protective Environments)

Hero Tales at We #MakeHealth Fest

Reblogged from Health Design By Us



Make Health: Personal Genomics Hero Story http://www.slideshare.net/perplexity/make-health-personal-genomics-hero-story

I was given the honor of closing remarks at the We Make Health Fest, and was pretty nervous about it frankly. I was supposed to do something on personal genomics along with the closing remarks. The very idea made me feel dizzy. I thought about it a lot for weeks without having any ideas I felt good about. One of the ideas was to make the whole thing a poem. Then I thought haiku for each section of the talk. Then I started outlining the talk and realized it sounded kind of like the Joseph Campbell’s hero’s journey, the whole Hero With a Thousand Faces idea. Last summer I was also taking the Coursera MOOC on Fantasy and Science Fiction in which we talked a lot about Propp’s functions of folktales. With all that, I got the idea to tell about personal genomics in my life as a kind of folk tale, and to talk about that experience as a representative process. That was the idea that struck roughly 24 hours before the event started. Oh.

As it turned out, there were so MANY heroes at the We Make Health Fest. So many of them had stories that contained a heroic challenge, a guide, a journey, a transformation, a rescue or solution. This was true from the very first presentation, with Joyce Lee and her son, talking about how they used Youtube to help teach schools how to keep him safe, and how the family worked together to make a large cardboard person to explain their warnings signs. Jane Berliss-Vincent described how an iPad saved a man’s life when he’d given up the will to live. Gary Olthoff made a device that was born out of long visits at hospital bedsides and seeing how nurses struggled with the mattresses. Duane Mackey overcame challenge after challenge in an engrossing story of the process that has culminated in his Open Source Mosquito Trap. The long journey to the stair-climbing wheelchair started young, in early school years, and became a mission. Mike Lee talked about how open teaching and learning resources can change lives in 3rd world countries. Marc Stephens literally transformed his own body through the use quantified self and wearable technology (and more!). Michael Flynn practically juggled the skateboard he was waving around, advocating for new opportunities for physical activities, while the McNaughton-Younger team brought their kids up on stage to help teach challenging concepts of diagnostic tools in surprisingly simple ways. Lia Min told a powerful story of being lost in a grocery story when young, and how sensory challenges can make that a much more confusing and frightening experience, then turning the story and the understanding into a tale for others, through her comic book.

Of course, our keynote speakers were both incredible, and heroes in their own right. Jose Gomez-Marquez explained how medical devices from first world countries fail in 3rd world countries, hidden costs with hidden agendas, and how simple tools and strategies can empower us all. John Costik really reached out and touched the hearts of the audience with his story of his child’s diagnosis with diabetes, how this radically changed their lives, the appearance of experts and guides who helped him along the road to creating the tools that are helping them all feel safer, and being used by so many others.

MakeHealthMontage

It wasn’t just the speakers who were heroes! In the exhibit hall, I was so thrilled to see people from e-NABLE with example Robohands, the open source prosthetic for those who may not be able to afford one. Other 3D printing experts at the event included All Hands Active, Maker Works, and the UM 3D Lab. Brian Zikmund-Fisher demonstrated tools that help people make sense of those confusing and mysterious numbers in research to help people make informed decisions through real understanding. Nanci Nanney lobbied for safe kitchens and restaurants for those with food allergies. Solus created a solution to help people with missing limbs be both more mobile and more comfortable.

We MakeHealth FESTWe MakeHealth FEST

That is just a small, very small, sampling of the heroes who were helping to make health, and who we were privileged to have at our inaugural We #MakeHealth Fest. Over coming weeks we will gradually bring out some of the videos (but it might take a while!). We will try to tell more of the stories, and introduce more of the people. If you were there, think about sharing a blogpost or tweet about what meant the most to you from the We #MakeHealth Fest.

#MakeHealth was AMAZING – Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of August 18, 2014)

It’s always a delight to have the opportunity to show off a University of Michigan event in these posts. It’s even more of a delight to show off an event of which I was so intimately a part, even though I have to confess I feel like I did very little and it was the community that really drove this magical event! I was just lucky to be among the core team at the front, along with the incredible Joyce Lee and Emily Hirshfeld! There are so very many incredible people who were involved I can’t possible thank them all.

One thing you’ll notice in these tweets is the range of media included — many photos and videos that may or may not display. To get a more engaging sense of the event as displayed in the tweets you may need to click through.

WANT MORE?


Reblogged from THL Blog: http://thlibrary.wordpress.com/2014/08/18/makehealth-was-amazing-hashtags-of-the-week-hotw-week-of-august-18-2014/

Designing Health, Making Health

Reblogged from Health Design By Us.

Health Design By Use

You may have noticed that the We Make Health Fest is sponsored by the Health Design By Us collaborative, of which Joyce Lee is the PI and I am a team member. So what is the connection, at least for us, between health design and making health? A good topic for the final post before the big event. For me, personally, my awareness of the intimate role of design in health began with doorknobs.

Doorknobs and Door Handles

Well, actually it came in the 80s when I was lucky enough to attend a presentation by Don Norman. (Yes, THAT Don Norman.) In the presentation I saw Don described what he called “The Pyschology of Everyday Things (POET).” I would have loved the talk for the name alone, but there was so much more. One of the first things Don did was to put up a whole series of slides of pictures of doorknobs and door handles, then talk about how the door tells us we should open it. He pointed out doors that don’t tell us, or confuse us; doors which seem to say ‘push’ when you need to pull and ‘pull’ when you ought to push. He showed us doors that can only be opened with two hands, with one hand, doors that want you to be righthanded or lefthanded, doors that can’t be opened at all if you are in a wheelchair, and then he showed us doors designed so well that you can open them without hands at all.

When you look at the intersection of the maker movement and healthcare, a great deal of the creativity is focused on solving problems like doorknobs. Problems that began with design that didn’t go as far as it might to include the people actually using whatever it is. With the maker movement, people might say, “Dagnabbit, why didn’t they make it THIS way?!” And then they remake it the way it should have been made in the first place. Or, if they can’t remake it themselves, they look for someone who can. Just last week

Patients think about things like this. A lot! And parents of kids. And the public.

Joyce thinks about things like this, too. (It’s part of what I love about working with her — her insight, caring, enthusiasm, excitement, energy, and her fabulous sense of humor.)

What it really takes, though, is partnerships, collaborations, people talking to other people, people who know that other people are out there interested and working on the same challenges. When Joyce has one of her design thinking workshops with a group of people, she’s encouraging them to think about the topic together, to imagine a better world, to work in teams, to leverage the insights and knowledge of one with the skills and talents of another (and then to switch places, so everyone is using insights and talents!).

Tim Brown says “design thinking” is a combination of what’s desirable, viable, and feasible. Reuven Cohen gives several overviews in Forbes, of which one says it is intelligence gathering, design, and choice, while another says the process stages are: Empathize, Define, Ideate, Prototype, Test. Wikipedia says “design thinking” is a combination of empathy, creativity, and rationality.

I like that so many of those definitions are rooted in empathy. Makers and inventors are excited by interesting problems. (So are researchers, of course.) In healthcare, there is an infinity of interesting problems. But it isn’t just about interesting problems, it’s about caring and need, that’s what starts people working on a problem. Given two equally interesting problems, the one with the greatest need, and the greatest need for heart, is the one that will get the most excitement.

In the maker community, a lot of what helps move things along is also about sharing, working together, sharing ideas and problems, digging around to find a solution. It is invention through flow (rather than by committee). When makers get together to work on a project they also brainstorm and share insights and ideas and resources. Then they go back to the drawing board until they get stuck. The ideas move from person to person, flowing around challenges (lack of resources, lack of skills) much like water flows around rocks in a stream.

Sometimes the flow moves from the person with the idea to someone with the expertise. A lot of the time, it isn’t that simple, and it flows back and forth. Having the idea is itself a kind of expertise. If we want real innovation in healthcare, we need more perspectives, more voices, more sources of imagination and creativity, skillsets that perhaps have not been traditionally valued in healthcare settings. And we have to listen, try to understand what the ideas are, where they are coming from.

With the We Make Health Fest, we’re hoping those different perspectives, voices, views, will meet, and discover each other. And then, maybe, just maybe, some of them will start something new.

“The call to care suggests a possible primary design position. … We might start from the assumption that, as designers, we do not know (yet) how the values of care are being lived and acted upon. We must interpret without (yet) being expert.” Jones PH. Design for care: innovating healthcare experience. Brooklyn, NY: Rosenfeld Media, (c)2013, p.xviii. https://rosenfeldmedia.com/books/design-for-care/

Maybe none of us are experts. Maybe all of us are experts. Maybe the kinds of expertise that will change healthcare the ways that are most needed are kinds of expertise we don’t even know how to recognize yet. But this is how we start finding out.


This was the last post before the big event on Saturday! Come to the We Make Health Fest on August 16th, 2014 in Palmer Commons at the University of Michigan or follow hashtag #makehealth on Twitter! Please follow @MakeHealthUM and @healthbyus on Twitter and please sign up for our mailing list so that you can join and contribute!

“There’s Magic Everywhere”: The #MakeHealth Exhibitors

Reposted from Health Design By Us

We Make Health Fest (University of Michigan)

The exhibits for the We Make Health Fest are visual, active, hands-on. We are hoping the exhibitors will show you how to do things yourself, discuss tips, tricks, strategies. So, for this blogpost, to try to replicate that sense of physical engagement in a virtual environment, the information about the exhibitors isn’t in a list studded with occasional pictures. Nope, it’s almost all pictures, in a slideshow you can click through yourself, at your own pace. Take a look, browse, think about which ones you want most to visit. And enjoy!