Tag Archives: umich

Celebrating Women Inventors at UofM (for #AdaLovelaceDay)

Ada Lovelace Day in Second Life

Why Ada Lovelace Day matters, asks the Guardian today. Usually people celebrate by highlighting famous women scientists. I asked myself, what about right here, right now? What are women scientists and inventors doing at the University of Michigan?

I figured the best way to find out was to go through the UM Tech Transfer database of Available Technologies for licensing. I skimmed the most recently deposited 100 inventions, looking for women. I found inventions in education and healthcare (even new cell lines!). I also found women inventing new batteries and biosensors, researchers working in engineering and code and physics, and even, yes, gamma rays! Some were prolific with MANY inventions listed recently. Most had one or two. They are ALL fabulous. And I am proud to say I know some of them personally. Take a look. See what cool smart women are inventing here. And remember: The sky is the limit!

Elizabeth W. Anderson – Responsible Conduct of Research for K Awardees (RCR4K) | Trainer’s Guide for Responsible Conduct of Research for K Awardees (RCR4K)

Valeria Bertacco – Post-Silicon Bug Diagnosis with Inconsistent Executions

Sarah Hawley – iCanDecide Conjoint Analysis Breast Cancer Treatment Decision Aid (ICanDecide)

Jane E. Huggins – Direct Brain-Computer Interface for Cognitive Assessment

Lori L. Isom – beta1/Contactin Cell Line

Helen C. Kales – WeCareAdvisor (based on her DICE method for dementia management)

Naheed Wali Khan – Multimodal Imaging in Retinal Diseases

Michelle Meade – Mobile Game for Spinal Cord Injury Health and Behavioral Rehabilitation

Sandra I. Merkel – Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability (FLACC) Observational Tool as a Measure of Pain

Janis Miller – Self-Instructional Voiding/Intake Diary and Individualizing Target Bladder Health Goals through Beverage Management

Mahta Moghaddam –
Method of Including Full-Wave Source Model in Acoustic and Electromagnetic Scattering and Inverse Scattering Formulations
Antenna and Propagation Model for Free-space Measurements and Experimental Inverse Scattering
Method for Large-Domain Microwave Breast Imaging

Sara Pozzi – Combined Scintillator-based Neutron and Gamma-ray Dosimeter

Emily Kaplan Mower Provost – Smartphone app for aphasia therapy

Mary C. Ruffolo PhD – Online evidence-based practice training modules

Melanie S. Sanford –
Organic Anolyte Materials for Flow Batteries
Generation of Ag18F and its use in the synthesis of PET radiotracers

Mary Simoni – Block M Records (University of Michigan Recordings) (Catalog)

Nancy Butler Songer – Evidence-based Learning Method for K-12 Students to Evaluate the Ecological Impacts of Climate Change

Laurie Sutch – Teaching and Technology Collaborative Workshop Registration System

Amy J. Teddy – Online concussion education for parents and coaches

Margaret S. Wooldridge – Cylinder Pressure and Heat Release Analysis Tool for Advanced Combustion Engines

“Send Silence Packing” at University of Michigan

Send Silence Packing #SendSilencePacking

Yesterday, I was walking towards the Diag at the heart of the University of Michigan’s Ann Arbor campus. I noticed some chalk drawings on the sidewalk, and took pictures. I noticed some carving on a treetrunk and took pictures.

And then I noticed all the backpacks. Everywhere. And all the students standing, bending, crouching to look at the backpacks more closely. I stopped. I bent over. I read the stories. Each backpack represents one person who died of suicide. Most of the backpacks have their story attached to it, with farewells from grieving loved ones. Some are the actual backpack the person used in their own student experience.

I walked around the collection of backpacks slowly. I snapped photos. I finished looking at one section of the backpacks and thought, WOW. Then I started walking again. And then I stopped again. Because it wasn’t just one section. The backpacks were everywhere. I kept looking, and watching, and taking pics, but did not even try to get pictures of ALL of the backpacks.

As I finally straightened up and was about to leave, I heard a woman’s voice behind me, saying "Hurry up. I don’t want to see this. I know, it’s probably a fact of life, but … " It was a woman who is probably my age, certainly past student age, but dressed like a student in tight leggings and a tshirt, with the arms of a light sweater tied around her shoulders. She and her companion sped up, almost sprinting past the display, her dyed-blonde ponytail bouncing in the sunlight of the beautiful day.

Read more from the Michigan Daily:
https://ssd.umich.edu/article/send-silence-packing-active-minds-university

At The Movies: Tactile Art & Tech for Autism

David Chesney is Back. This Time With Sean Ahlquist (Art & Architecture) and Sile O’Modhrain (Music). The project being highlighted this time is designed to use a flexible stretch “coloring book” to provide a kind of engaging biofeedback to children with autism regarding the amount of pressure they are using. This would have been fantastic to have when my son was small.

David Chesney: “The research that I do here at the University of Michigan is at the intersection of technology and childhood disability.”


Tactile Art | MichEpedia | MconneX https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uQU7ZhMvH2k

University researchers and students create device designed to aid in Autism therapy https://www.michigandaily.com/news/university-researchers-and-students-different-fields-study-create-device-designed-aid-autism-th

More videos about the project from Dr. Ahlquist.

Social Sensory Surfaces Research Project from Sean Ahlquist on Vimeo.

Social Sensory Surfaces Research Project https://vimeo.com/125392278

Stretch|PLAY from Sean Ahlquist on Vimeo.

Stretch|PLAY https://vimeo.com/125633678

Social Sensory Surfaces: http://taubmancollege.umich.edu/research/research-through-making/2015/social-sensory-surfaces

Related work from Dr. Chesney on his work with autism.


Software Engineering Class Hacks Autism https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CUT-Chcffqc

Digital avatars help children with autism – w/video http://www.autismdailynewscast.com/digital-avatars-help-children-autism/21463/snapshot/

Hacking Autism and University of Michigan https://www.autismspeaks.org/blog/2012/05/01/hacking-autism-and-university-michigan

Video games help autistic students in classrooms http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/news/health/story/2012-05-31/video-games-autism-students/55319452/1

More interesting projects by Dr. Chesney & his students.


Untapped Resonance: David Chesney at TEDxUofM https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GO9HSiUMylE


Engineering with Grace: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aDjYoyYfUQE
Engineering with Grace: Software class aims to help one teen communicate: http://ns.umich.edu/new/multimedia/slideshows/21712-engineering-with-grace-software-class-aims-to-help-one-teen-communicate
Computer Science with Soul: http://dme.engin.umich.edu/grace/


Provost’s Seminar on Teaching – Presenter David Chesney https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FDSwN1MEfnY

Risk Bites Ten Thousand! (Or, The Bravery of Academic Discourse On Youtube)

"Help us unleash the Elements of Risk Song!"

I LOVE RISK BITES!!! Ok, there you have it. I confess. Here is part of why I like them so much. You see, I don’t just love Risk Bites. I love a LOT of Youtube science education channels. But of the top science channels on Youtube, the ones with a huge fan base and almost aggressive vitality, most of them are either created by kids, young adults, and hobbyists, or they are from huge big money operations. (Please see the APPENDIX at the bottom of this post for more about “What do popular science channels look like?”) What’s missing? Academics and professionals.

And why not? Why shouldn’t there be popular science video channels from academics? WHY NOT?

Yes, universities have Youtube channels and make videos highlighting research by their faculty. Typically, they don’t go viral. Look at them, and you can tell why. They’re good, but dry. They are just not going to get the eyeballs in the same way. They aren’t, well, FUN! A lot of the reason why they aren’t fun is that they’re afraid. They’re afraid of not looking academic. They’re afraid of what their peers will say. They’re afraid of taking the risk, and maybe having someone misunderstand what they said. They’re afraid of looking silly.

MLGSCA09 Cerritos: SocMed Risks - Looking Silly

Academics tend to judge other academics. They complain bitterly when the general public won’t listen to them, but on the flip side, God help any academic who does succeed in getting public attention for communicating science well. Typically, they are ridiculed and undermined by their academic peers. We, as academics, as institutions of learning, need to cut that out. When we belittle and criticize other academics for communicating effectively with the public, it makes all of us look bad. It undermines the credibility of all of science. It weakens our justification for funding, and the understanding the public has of what we do. If you have to criticize another scientist or researcher, stick to the science, and don’t blame them for “being popular.”

Risk Bites is brave. They take the risks that other academics are often afraid to take. They talk about important and sometimes controversial topics. They do so in an engaging and still accurate way, sticking to the good science, and providing more resources in the notes for people who want to explore or learn more. They engage in the conversation with people who comment. They even make videos responding to points brought up in conversation. They are building a community.

Risk Bites is the best example I know of an academic or professional voice that intentionally, purposefully, and responsibly positions itself in the space inhabited by FUN science education videos. Here is more about the background and thought behind what they are trying to do.

So, when I say I love Risk Bites, I am not just talking about the great videos, or the quality of the content, or the awesome and relevant timely selection of topics. I’m talking also about the vision, the mission, the willingness to take risks, the BRAVERY of what they are doing. And I passionately want others to notice, pay attention, and support this grand effort.

When I heard that Risk Bites has a subscription drive, I wanted to write this. I want you to stop and think about how academic science information in Youtube compares to the popular science channels. Check out Sixty Symbols, from the University of Nottingham. That is the only popular science channel I could find from an academic source. Think about why more of us aren’t there, why WE aren’t there, why YOU aren’t there.

And then I want you to do the right thing. I want you to help to get eyeballs on another strong academic science voice in Youtube. I want you to support the people who are brave enough to try. I want you to go to the Risk Bites channel, watch some of their videos, comment, ask questions, tell them what they can do better, and SUBSCRIBE!


Help us unleash the Elements of Risk Song! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=neOQEEAiwQM&list=UU8cxoTk9M0HdZB3gyJNjEtw


APPENDIX: 31 POPULAR YOUTUBE SCIENCE CHANNELS BY SUBSCRIBERS

VSauce 8,016,315
National Geographic 3,597,161
ASAP Science 3,146,879
VSauce2 3,096,072
Minute Physics 2,573,651
Charlie Is So Cool Like 2,402,791
SciShow 2,234,369
Smarter Every Day 2,194,233
VSauce3 2,112,344
Veritasium 1,965,852
Discovery 1,257,189
Mental Floss 1,123,990
Animal Planet 985,375
Minute Earth 918,132
NatGeoWild 649,592
PBS Idea Channel 580,887
Periodic Videos 500,874
NASA 450,711
The Verge 432,404
Sixty Symbols 426,072
Sick Science 399,926
Discovery TV 330,897
Science Channel 266,605
The Brain Scoop 248,660
SciShow Space 246,757
It’s OK to be Smart 239,810
Best0fScience 162,251
Bizarre ER 159,184
Spangler Science TV 146,369
Hard Science 131,431
New Scientist 117,609

MedX, and TEDMED, and the Inauguration, Oh, MY!!

MedX, UM Inaugural Symposia, TEDMED

Last week I was privileged to listen in on a press conference for the upcoming TEDMED. Tomorrow is the Symposia for the Inauguration of UM’s new President, Mark S. Schlissel, with Harold Varmus as a guest speaker! Later tomorrow and this weekend, I’ll be watching Stanford’s Medicine X (#MedX) through their Global Access program. Next week the UM Medical School will be hosting a viewing of TEDMED. I feel like I’m swimming in an intellectual biomedical broth!


President Schlissel Inauguration Symposia with Harold Varmus

Inaugural Symposia: Sustaining the Biomedical Research Enterprise and Privacy and Identity in a Hyperconnected Society

HASHTAG: #UMPres14
LIVESTREAM (1): http://umich.edu/watch/
LIVESTREAM (2): http://www.mgoblue.com/collegesportslive/?media=461850

The Inaugural Symposia for President Schissel’s investiture (8:30am ET to 12:00 noon ET) are composed of two very interesting topics and even more interesting collections of speakers. The first part, “Sustaining the Biomedical Research Enterprise,” is the section including the famous Harold Varmus, but also five other notable researchers from on campus, experts in chemistry, genetics/genomics, neuroscience, statistics, and biomedical imaging. (I’m excited that three of the five have expertise related to genomics!)

The focus of the first symposia centers around a recent article from Varmus and colleagues entitled, “Rescuing US biomedical research from its systemic flaws.

The provocative abstract states:

“The long-held but erroneous assumption of never-ending rapid growth in biomedical science has created an unsustainable hypercompetitive system that is discouraging even the most outstanding prospective students from entering our profession—and making it difficult for seasoned investigators to produce their best work. This is a recipe for long-term decline, and the problems cannot be solved with simplistic approaches. Instead, it is time to confront the dangers at hand and rethink some fundamental features of the US biomedical research ecosystem.”

Those three ‘simple’ sentences imply an enormity of challenges which impact both locally and globally. I guarantee it will be fascinating to hear this panel discuss these and brainstorm ways in which the University of Michigan might work towards addressing them here.


Stanford Medicine X

Stanford Medicine X 2014

HASHTAG: #MedX
LIVESTREAM: Available with pre-registration through the MedX Global Access program: http://medicinex.stanford.edu/2014-global-access-program/.

Lucky for me, the Stanford Medicine X event is on the other coast, so our local event will be almost completed when they begin livestreaming at 8AM PT (11AM ET). However, Medicine X conference lasts a solid three days, and includes topics from self-tracking to self-awareness, from entrepreneurship to partnership in design, from compassion to PCORI, from pain to clinical trials to games. It’s intense. A lot of my friends will be there, too many to name, but they include doctors, patients, geeks, and more. MedX is a powerful diverse community, and this is an exciting event.

Schedule: http://medicinex.stanford.edu/2014-schedule/


TEDMED 2014

TEDMED 2014

HASHTAGS: #TEDMED; #TEDMEDlive; #TEDMEDhive; #GreatChallenges.
LIVESTREAMING OPTIONS: http://www.tedmed.com/event/tedmedlive

TEDMED is a little different from the other two events in that it isn’t sponsored through higher education and the livestream isn’t usually free. For folk here in Ann Arbor, there is a way to watch it on campus. What you’ll see if you come includes very little that is expected. Even when someone has a job description that might sound like regular healthcare folk, what they are talking about will probably be a surprise. Beyond the idea of doctor, patient, nurse or neuroscientist, you will also hear comedians, musicians, athletes, bioethicists, military, philosophers, inventors, and more. But what else would you expect, when the theme of the event is “Unlocking Imagination”?

The TEDMED event is a little more complicated than in prior years because they are having presenters and events on both coasts — in Washington DC and in San Francisco. Some parts will overlap. Other parts won’t. You can check out the schedules for both coasts here.

Washington DC Stage Schedule (pdf)

San Francisco CA Stage Schedule (pdf)

To watch locally, details are given below.

Watch the Live Stream of TEDMED Conference, September 10-12

The Medical School will host a live stream from the TEDMED conference, which takes place September 10-12 in Washington DC and San Francisco. The focus of this year’s program is “Unlocking Imagination in Service of Health and Medicine.” Presenters include some of the most respected and undiscovered names in science, journalism, education, business, and technology. Click here to see the conference schedule. Viewing times and locations for watching the live streams are:

Wednesday, September 10: 8am-5pm: University Hospital South (Old Mott) 8th floor lounge
Thursday, September 11: 8am-12pm, 1pm-5pm: University Hospital South (Old Mott) 8th floor lounge
Friday, September 12: 8am-11:30am: University Hospital South (Old Mott) 8409 Conference Room
Friday, September 12: 11:30am-5pm: University Hospital South (Old Mott) 8419 IDTT Collaboration Space

Who Is Making Health Here? #makehealth

Reposted from Health Design By Us: Who is Making Health Here? #makehealth; Find out about the health-makers you’ll meet on Saturday!


We Make Health Fest (University of Michigan)

When we started planning this, more than once Joyce told me, “Hey, I’ll be happy if five people show up.” Well, we did a lot of talking, had a lot of meetings, asked people to spread the word, and … the resulting response has been beyond our WILDEST dreams! Since this is our first time, we wanted to keep this as open as possible, and create as many opportunities for people to be involved as we could. Exhibitors are timesharing booths and tables. Speakers are doing mostly pecha kucha style 5-minute presentations. We didn’t want to say “no” to anyone! So if you say you’re a maker and wanted to be involved, we did our darnedest to try to fit you in somewhere. So who all will you find if you come? Here’s how you find out.

On our website: http://makehealth.us/

Direct link to the full speaker and exhibitor schedule as a downloadable PDF: http://bit.ly/MakeHealthFestSpeakers

We also are in the process of adding the schedule into Lanyrd.

Lanyrd: We Make Health Fest: Schedule

Lanyrd has an app, if you want to use it during the event.

Lanyrd apps: Android | iPhone | Mobile Web | Open Web

Or you can simply read on!

SPEAKERS

10:30am Joyce Lee / Welcome
10:35am Jose Gomez-Marquez / Keynote
11:05am John Costik / Keynote: Hacking Diabetes
11:35am Andrew Maynard / Color My Poop Beautiful, and Other Tales of Tech Derring Do
11:55 Makers the Movie
1:05pm Matt Christensen / Linnetic: A Better Way to Monitor Asthma
1:10pm Nanci and Eilah Nanney / GREAT Gluten-Free Kitchens!
1:15pm Marc Stephens / Tech-Savvy Fitness
1:25pm Jane Berliss-Vincent / The iPad as Resuscitation Device: Notes on Assistive Tech in the Hospital Environment
1:35pm Linda Diane Feldt / There is a Free Lunch: Wildcrafting and Foraging for Food and Medicine
1:45pm Kris Kullgren / Mott Kids4Kids: Utilizing Peer Education Videos at Bedside and Beyond
1:55pm Amer Abughaida / A Manual Stair-Climbing Wheelchair
2:00pm Duane Mackey / Open Source Mosquito Trap
2:05pm Brandon McNaughton / Kitchen-Table Diagnostics with Glass Microbubbles
2:10pm James Rampton / Learning Health System – Consumer Application
2:20pm Irene Knokh / Free Educational Resources: MERLOT and beyond!
2:25pm Mike Lee / Demonstration of World Possible’s Remote Areas Community Hotspots for Education and Learning (RACHEL) Project
2:35pm Sandy Merkel / The Poke Program
2:45pm Harpreet Singh / Communication Box: Flip the Health Care Culture by T.R.U.M.P. Technique
2:55pm Michael Flynn / Fostering a sense of community in hospital lobbies with interactive public art
3:00pm Gary Olthoff / EZCarryBed Mattress Carrier Handle
3:05pm George Albercook / DIY Hearing Aids – A Model MakeHealth
3:15pm Pete Wendel / Games and User Interface Design: Thinking Differently to Affect Elderly Quality of Life
3:25pm Lia Min / In My Spectrum: A Comic about Autism Desktop
3:35pm Shawn O’Grady / 3D Printing and Rapid Prototyping
3:40pm George Albercook / Makers Answer the Call
3:45pm AJ Montpetit / Disrupting Health Care
3:55pm PF Anderson / Personalized Genomics and Closing Remarks

EXHIBITORS

10am – 12pm
IconArray.com: A Free Generator of Health Risk Graphics
Linnetic: A Better Way to Monitor Asthma
Type 1 Diabetes

10am – 1pm
Building Capacity for the Ann Arbor Sharing Economy
National Foundation for Celiac Awareness — GREAT Kitchens!
We Make Health Stories

10am – 2pm
Cardboard Challenge: #makehealth
Kitchen-Table Diagnostics with Glass Microbubbles

10am – 3pm
The Poke Program

11am – 12pm
Free Educational Resources: MERLOT and Beyond

12pm – 2pm
A Manual Stair-Climbing Wheelchair
Demonstration of World Possible’s Remote Areas Community Hotspots for Education and Learning (RACHEL) Project
Hacking Diabetes
Learning Health System – Consumer Application

1pm – 4pm
Michigan Engineered for All Libes (M-HEAL)

2pm – 4pm
Open Source Mosquito Trap

Make Health Fest Coming August 16!

Detroit Maker Faire 2013#UMSIMakerfest !!!Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2013
Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2013Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2014Detroit Maker Faire 2013
Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2014Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2014Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2013

We Make Health Fest
Saturday, Aug 16th, 2014
University of Michigan
Palmer Commons, Great Lakes Rooms

Short Description
“A collaborative event for a local and virtual community interested in health, technology, and participatory design. Join us for a full day of health themed design and maker activities!”

Longer Description
Many types of events are being triggered by the creativity of the Maker Movement — maker faires, mini-maker faires, maker camps, maker festivals, maker fests and makerfests, make-a-thons and createathons (also spelled makeathon or makethon), open make events, maker madness events, maker shows — and they come in all sizes, flavors, and themes. What does that mean? Think of it as a mash-up of science fair PLUS Hands On Museum or Exploratorium PLUS do it yourself! It’s all about learning and creating and problemsolving through a combination of Show+Tell+Do! Here at the University of Michigan, many people on campus are partnering on taking the “maker culture” energy and applying it through a lens focused on health to promote participatory and collaborative strategies in healthcare. Come, have fun, learn, make stuff, but more than that, meet other interesting and creative people who are interested in using what they have, know, and can do to Make Health!

Learn More!

Make Health: http://makehealth.us/
Twitter: @MakeHealthUM
Google Plus: Make Health UM

A project of HealthDesignBy.Us
Twitter: @HealthByUs
Blog: Introducing @HealthByUs

We Make Health


First posted at THL Blog: http://thlibrary.wordpress.com/2014/06/25/make-health-fest-coming-august-16/

UM Plays a Part in National News Around #CerebralPalsySwagger — Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of June 9, 2014)

The Cerebral Palsy Swagger
Cerebral Palsy Swagger: https://www.facebook.com/cerebralpalsyswagger

It doesn’t happen that often that a Twitter hashtag about health blows up into a national news story, and even less often that this will happen with an event hinged around the University of Michigan! Many thanks to my colleague Anna Schnitzer for bringing this to my attention, and please excuse us if this post is a little more “feel good” than usual. The story is about two brothers, Hunter and Braden Gandee, who went on a journey last weekend to raise awareness about cerebral palsy. 7-yr-old Braden was carried by his 14-yr-old brother, Hunter, for 40 miles, from the Michigan-Ohio border to the University of Michigan Bahna Wrestling Center in Ann Arbor. The news loved it, beginning with local stories (M-Go Blue, and MLive), then taking off across the US, from the Detroit Free Press to Fox News, NBC News, People Magazine, the Today Show, and even ESPN and Canada! And here comes the buzz from Twitter (mostly pictures, with reactions from real people around the country).


First posted at THL Blog: http://thlibrary.wordpress.com/2014/06/10/um-plays-a-part-in-national-news-around-cerebralpalsyswagger-hashtags-of-the-week-hotw-week-of-june-9-2014/

Every Day In Many Ways: Solving “Wicked Problems” at the University of Michigan

Horizon Report 2014 Trends & Challenges
Horizon Report 2014: http://www.nmc.org/publications/2014-horizon-report-higher-ed

The past couple months, the Cool Toys Conversations group has been discussing the Horizon Report, as we do every year. This year we decided the collection of technologies was perhaps not as interesting as the trends and challenges they identified (screenshot above).

Yesterday, over the lunch hour, the group became particularly interested in the wicked problem of “Keeping Education Relevant.” There was a lot of good conversation, and I unfortunately did not take notes, so I am going to trust my memory (HAH!). The gist of it was encapsulated in a couple points. David Crandall pointed out that there is a strong relationship between the so-called solvable challenges and the so-called wicked (or unsolvable) challenges, with the hint that perhaps solving the solvable challenges might actually take us a long way towards solving the unsolvable challenges. (Yes, it’s ok to giggle – that’s a lot of the same word.)

Next was the observation that “Keeping Education Relevant” is distinct from keeping learning relevant, since learning is ALWAYS relevant. So the question is less about how to keep learning relevant, but more about how to position the kind of education that happens in higher education as an active participant in the broad open amorphous space that is comprised of all those glorious online and offline social learning spaces that people love so much.

Last but not least was the interjection that, Hello! Maybe it isn’t so unsolvable after all, since so many folk here are already doing such exciting things to position us, as academics, in ways to show relevance to the public and to engage with the public. Actually, I suspect that all major universities are engaged in similar kinds of activities, and working hard to make clear the ways in which academia is not only relevant, but makes possible research and learning opportunities that benefit the broader communities and which would not be possible or practical in other types of spaces and structures.

Here are just a very FEW examples of activities around campus that are, frankly, not atypical and which illustrate ways in which we are making academia relevant here, every day, as a routine part of business.

UMSI MAKERFEST

#UMSIMakerfest !!! | #UMSIMakerfest !!!
#UMSIMakerfest !!! | #UMSIMakerfest !!!

Today, the School of Information had a Makerfest in the Union. As you can see from the poster, they had a lot of cool stuff going on, from Google Glass and Rasperry Pi to video games and cookies. Among their partners for this event were multiple community makerspaces, both the campus and local public library, individuals with special talents or resources, and of course, campus groups. Was the audience just college students? No way! Students were there, but also parents and kids, teachers, staff, community, and I don’t know who else.

#UMSIMakerfest: https://www.flickr.com/photos/rosefirerising/sets/72157642967068393

TEDXUOFM

DSC_0149 | IMG_6735
3O5A9174_Kimwall | TEDxUofM
IMG_5416 | eak.FEA.TEDxUofM.4-8-11.044.

A couple weeks ago (less, actually), the campus had our TEDx event (TEDxUofM). TEDx events are gatherings of fascinating people sharing innovative and creative ideas. They are spinoffs from the large TED organization where TED stands for Technology Entertainment and Design. My brain keeps trying to change the “E” to “Education”, since that’s what my brain associates with the TED videos, but when you think about it, “Education” and “Entertainment” are pretty closely related in many important ways.

With our local TEDxUofM event, it ALWAYS is highlighting topics that connect academia and the real world, projects that make a difference in the lives of real people, stories that touch hearts and lives. It doesn’t accomplish this by just making a forum for faculty to preach to the choir, but by giving prominence to projects by students and alumni as well, and by getting faculty to talk about their passions beyond their official job duties. In this sense it is like most other TED and TEDx events. Here, of course, the event connects the campus and the town and community. There isn’t just one TEDx event locally, but several — TEDxDetroit, TEDxUofM, TEDxEMU, TEDxSkylineHS, TEDxArb, TEDxYouth@AnnArbor, TEDxUMDearborn, and probably more I haven’t covered/discovered. TEDx events are partnerships with the community, ways to bring information out of ivory towers and into public spaces. They engage, emote, intrigue, and inspire. They foster awareness, and through awareness future collaborations.

RISK BITES

In Andrew Maynard’s recent presentation, “Should Academics Get Down and Dirty with Youtube?,” he illustrated the power of Youtube to reach the public, to educate, to inform, and to potentially inform policy and decisionmakers. This insight of his was reinforced by President Obama’s recruitment of video bloggers (vloggers) with strong reach among the youth audience in order to disseminate critical information about the Obamacare registration deadlines.

Andrew highlighted a number of influential vloggers who present content on science and research, but who are not themselves from academia, then asking what is it that they are doing that we are not? Why is it that the general public obviously have a passion for information about science, but find science information more persuasive when presented by someone who is not a scientist? What are we not doing that we should be or could be doing? These questions are what inspired him to create the Risk Bites series of science videos, in which he endeavors to position academic and heavily evidence-based science information in a public space in a way that will hopefully reach those who need the information. Here is the most recent video from that series as an example.


What’s the difference between hazard and risk? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_GwVTdsnN1E

ROAD SCHOLARS

Goodwill-Industries | Chateau-Chantal
Cascade-Engineering | Discussion-with-legislators

The University of Michigan Road Scholars program has been going on for DECADES. The idea was, yet again, how to make academia relevant to the communities in which we find ourselves. More than that, it was how to create bridges, connections, and partnerships between the University and the people of our state. In the Road Scholars program, faculty travel the state on a kind of pilgrimage to various communities around Michigan, developing a genuine and personal connection to the people and places, learning about the initiatives and work that is done around the state, and fostering opportunities for outreach, partnerships, mutual regard and learning.

GHANA EMERGENCY MEDICINE COLLABORATIVE
D80_35
Ghana-Michigan Conference Nov 2009 023 | Ghana-Michigan Conference Nov 2009 024
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The Ghana Emergency Medicine Collaborative is another project that has been going on for a while. These images are from an early event in 2009 which laid some of the groundwork for this collaboration between the University and medical programs in Ghana. The collaboration involves individuals from both schools going to the other country to learn more about needs, resources, and opportunities. This innovative partnership drove much of the initial development of the University’s creation of open education resources, and has proven to have a large and lasting impact far beyond the original scope of the project.

CLOSING THOUGHTS

Are you here at the University of Michigan? Are you interested in a campus-wide conversation about barriers to innovation in education and what we are already doing to solve these problems? Do you know of some amazing work people are doing to help keep us relevant? Please add your thoughts in the comments.

“One Simple Question” A History of Helping #UMSSD40

I’ve been wishing Storfiy embeds would work in this blog, but having to make do, and will share them here anyway, however awkwardly. So, here’s the first one I am sharing.

Last week Jane Vincent gave a wonderful presentation on the history and evolution of assistive technology and other resources on the University of Michigan campus for students with disabilities. The presentation was the kickoff for a year of wonderful events celebrating the 40th anniversary of Services for Students with Disabilities on campus.

Jane was a student during some of the early stages of getting this really off the ground, and now she is a leading point person for assistive technology information and access on campus. Along the way, she’s known most of the wonderful good hearted folk who have been working in this area here.

Jane shared her slides, but spoke for a long time on each slide, so the slides can only begin the process of providing insight and telling the story.

I live-tweeted the presentation, only catching a few of the high points. I was delighted that the tweeting capture the interest of people beyond UM, even engaging one of my favorite authors, Jacqueline Lichtenberg. The video will be available later, but in the meantime, check out the Storify for more information.