Tag Archives: video

Have You Seen … What NIH is doing with their videocasts?

EDITORIAL ASIDE:
Yes, I’ve been away for a long time. I have so much to share, and so many lovely blogposts and concepts parked in “draft” mode. It’s been a rough few years culminating in a really rough year. More on that later. For now, I want to dip my toes back in with something short and easy that I can do quickly.


If I had infinite time, or several dozen of me connected to a shared massive brain, one of the things I’d like to do is lurk in various lecture series and soak up all kind of cutting edge info, philosophies, science, research discoveries, and so forth. Recently, I’ve been closely tracking the NIH Videocasts. So much wonderful information being presented, and lucky for us, most of it ends up on Youtube as NIHVcast!

Here are a few highlights from the Youtube channel, mostly from the NIH Director’s Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series and the Demystifying Medicine series, but with a few also from the Translational Research in Clinical Oncology (TRACO) program.

NIHVCAST HIGHLIGHTS

Demystifying Medicine 2017: Mitochondria, Aging, and Chronic Disease

Germs, genes, and host defense

TRACO 2016: Precision Medicine and Nanotechnology

Ancient DNA and the new science of the human past

Democratizing discovery science with n=Me

Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee – July 2016

Decoding the human genome: getting to 20/20

MicroRNAs and their regulatory effects

The epigenetic clock, biological age, and chronic diseases

Genome regulation by long noncoding RNAs

Demystifying Medicine 2016: How Long Can and Should We Live & What Centenarians Teach Us about Aging

Bacteria as master regulators and aphrodisiacs

Demystifying Medicine 2016: Robotic Planetary Exploration and Thoughts about Human Spaceflight

Age, genes, sex, and smell: predicting Parkinson disease

Demystifying Medicine 2016: Cholesterol: Too Much and Too Little Are Bad for Your Health

Biomedical research: increasing value, reducing waste

Demystifying Medicine 2016: Trauma in the Modern Age: Injury and Stem Cells

On My Own: An Afternoon with Diane Rehm

Demystifying Medicine 2016: Multiple Sclerosis: Mechanisms and Imaging the Process

Innate molecules in the inflammation and cancer

Using human stem cells to understand and treat diabetes

Adventures in brain plasticity: from memory palaces to soulcycle

Aaron, Lost, and Found Again

Panel: Open Access Activism, The Story of Aaron Swartz, with lessons for libraries and information.

Panel: Open Access Activism, The Story of Aaron Swartz, with lessons for libraries and information.

It’s been a couple years since Aaron died. Aaron who? Aaron Swartz. I’ve talked about him here a few times (Jan. 14, 2013; Jan. 15, 2013; Feb 2013; Jan 2014). Aaron was one of those bright and shining young stars, who did amazing things at early ages (helped code RSS at age 14?). reimagined ways to access information (see his fantastic Image Atlas collaboration with Taryn Simon), made very clear challenges with the status quo, and promised a future with much to contribute. That didn’t happen quite the way people hoped. In case you haven’t heard of him, there are a few links at the end of this post. Here is a quote from his dad at his memorial.

“We can’t bring Aaron back, he can no longer be the tireless worker for good… What we can do is change things for the better. We can work to change MIT so that it . . . once again becomes a place where risk and coloring outside the lines is encouraged, a space where the cruelties of the world are pushed back and our most creative flourish rather than being crushed.” https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2014/03/29/the-inside-story-mit-and-aaron-swartz/YvJZ5P6VHaPJusReuaN7SI/story.html

The University of Michigan is planning a really fantastic event this month looking at the circumstances of Aaron’s death, the factors that led up to it, the changes that have come after it, and how this has and is changing the information landscape and legal context in which libraries operate. Even better, you get to see the movie for FREE! Here is the event information.

Panel: Open Access Activism
Wednesday, June 17 at 4:00pm
Library Gallery, Hatcher Graduate Library, University of Michigan

Panelists:
Melissa Levine, U-M Library’s Lead Copyright Officer
Jack Bernard, U-M Associate General Counsel
Brian Knappenberger, Director, The Internet’s Own Boy: The Story of Aaron Swartz

Brian Knappenberger’s film chronicles the story of Aaron Swartz, information-access activist and Internet prodigy, who was targeted by the FBI in a high-profile criminal case involving JSTOR and MIT at the time of his death. Join Knappenberger, along with Lead Copyright Officer Melissa Levine, and Associate General Counsel Jack Bernard in a panel discussion about the issues of the case and how they relate to libraries and information both more generally and at the University of Michigan.

Film Screening: The Internet’s Own Boy: The Story of Aaron Swartz
Tuesday, June 16 at 7:00pm
Join us for this free screening with the filmmaker at Michigan Theater the evening prior to the panel.

LINKS

AaronSw (his site): http://www.aaronsw.com/

Wikipedia: Aaron Swartz: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aaron_Swartz

The inside story of MIT and Aaron Swartz: More than a year after Swartz killed himself rather than face prosecution, questions about MIT’s handling of the hacking case persist: https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2014/03/29/the-inside-story-mit-and-aaron-swartz/YvJZ5P6VHaPJusReuaN7SI/story.html

Remember Aaron Swartz: http://www.rememberaaronsw.com/memories/

Naughton, John. Aaron Swartz stood up for freedom and fairness – and was hounded to his death: The internet activist who paid the ultimate price for his combination of genius and conscience. The Guardian 7 February 2015 18.00 EST. http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/feb/07/aaron-swartz-suicide-internets-own-boy

The Life of Aaron Swartz (a collection from the Internet Archive of the rich activity surrounding his loss): https://www.archive-it.org/collections/3492

BBC Four: Storyville: The Internet’s Own Boy http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b051wkry [IMDB: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt3268458/ ] [Review: http://www.theguardian.com/film/2014/aug/31/internets-own-boy-review-aaron-swartz-mark-kermode ]

Internet Activist, a Creator of RSS, Is Dead at 26, Apparently a Suicide http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/13/technology/aaron-swartz-internet-activist-dies-at-26.html?_r=0

Risk Bites Ten Thousand! (Or, The Bravery of Academic Discourse On Youtube)

"Help us unleash the Elements of Risk Song!"

I LOVE RISK BITES!!! Ok, there you have it. I confess. Here is part of why I like them so much. You see, I don’t just love Risk Bites. I love a LOT of Youtube science education channels. But of the top science channels on Youtube, the ones with a huge fan base and almost aggressive vitality, most of them are either created by kids, young adults, and hobbyists, or they are from huge big money operations. (Please see the APPENDIX at the bottom of this post for more about “What do popular science channels look like?”) What’s missing? Academics and professionals.

And why not? Why shouldn’t there be popular science video channels from academics? WHY NOT?

Yes, universities have Youtube channels and make videos highlighting research by their faculty. Typically, they don’t go viral. Look at them, and you can tell why. They’re good, but dry. They are just not going to get the eyeballs in the same way. They aren’t, well, FUN! A lot of the reason why they aren’t fun is that they’re afraid. They’re afraid of not looking academic. They’re afraid of what their peers will say. They’re afraid of taking the risk, and maybe having someone misunderstand what they said. They’re afraid of looking silly.

MLGSCA09 Cerritos: SocMed Risks - Looking Silly

Academics tend to judge other academics. They complain bitterly when the general public won’t listen to them, but on the flip side, God help any academic who does succeed in getting public attention for communicating science well. Typically, they are ridiculed and undermined by their academic peers. We, as academics, as institutions of learning, need to cut that out. When we belittle and criticize other academics for communicating effectively with the public, it makes all of us look bad. It undermines the credibility of all of science. It weakens our justification for funding, and the understanding the public has of what we do. If you have to criticize another scientist or researcher, stick to the science, and don’t blame them for “being popular.”

Risk Bites is brave. They take the risks that other academics are often afraid to take. They talk about important and sometimes controversial topics. They do so in an engaging and still accurate way, sticking to the good science, and providing more resources in the notes for people who want to explore or learn more. They engage in the conversation with people who comment. They even make videos responding to points brought up in conversation. They are building a community.

Risk Bites is the best example I know of an academic or professional voice that intentionally, purposefully, and responsibly positions itself in the space inhabited by FUN science education videos. Here is more about the background and thought behind what they are trying to do.

So, when I say I love Risk Bites, I am not just talking about the great videos, or the quality of the content, or the awesome and relevant timely selection of topics. I’m talking also about the vision, the mission, the willingness to take risks, the BRAVERY of what they are doing. And I passionately want others to notice, pay attention, and support this grand effort.

When I heard that Risk Bites has a subscription drive, I wanted to write this. I want you to stop and think about how academic science information in Youtube compares to the popular science channels. Check out Sixty Symbols, from the University of Nottingham. That is the only popular science channel I could find from an academic source. Think about why more of us aren’t there, why WE aren’t there, why YOU aren’t there.

And then I want you to do the right thing. I want you to help to get eyeballs on another strong academic science voice in Youtube. I want you to support the people who are brave enough to try. I want you to go to the Risk Bites channel, watch some of their videos, comment, ask questions, tell them what they can do better, and SUBSCRIBE!


Help us unleash the Elements of Risk Song! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=neOQEEAiwQM&list=UU8cxoTk9M0HdZB3gyJNjEtw


APPENDIX: 31 POPULAR YOUTUBE SCIENCE CHANNELS BY SUBSCRIBERS

VSauce 8,016,315
National Geographic 3,597,161
ASAP Science 3,146,879
VSauce2 3,096,072
Minute Physics 2,573,651
Charlie Is So Cool Like 2,402,791
SciShow 2,234,369
Smarter Every Day 2,194,233
VSauce3 2,112,344
Veritasium 1,965,852
Discovery 1,257,189
Mental Floss 1,123,990
Animal Planet 985,375
Minute Earth 918,132
NatGeoWild 649,592
PBS Idea Channel 580,887
Periodic Videos 500,874
NASA 450,711
The Verge 432,404
Sixty Symbols 426,072
Sick Science 399,926
Discovery TV 330,897
Science Channel 266,605
The Brain Scoop 248,660
SciShow Space 246,757
It’s OK to be Smart 239,810
Best0fScience 162,251
Bizarre ER 159,184
Spangler Science TV 146,369
Hard Science 131,431
New Scientist 117,609