Tag Archives: maker faire

#MakeHealth RETURNS!

Make Health Fest 2015

We are gearing up for this year’s repeat of the fantastic Make Health event, a maker event themed around healthcare.

Make Health Fest: http://makehealth.us/
(Pssst! Check out #MakeHealth on Twitter)

This year (THIS WEEKEND!!), MakeHealth is a two-day event, with presentations split onto two different days, and booths and demos on Sunday. Check the schedule carefully to not miss something you want to see.

FESTIVAL: Make Health Fest: 11 am – 6 pm, Sunday, October 25th, 2015
SYMPOSIUM: The Nightscout Project, Patient-Driven Innovation, & the Maker Movement: 9:30 am – 12 pm, Monday, October 26th, 2015

This year we have been recruiting some awesome campus and community partners (and the list is still growing!). We are also seeking volunteers of all sorts (and you can volunteer to help at the website). We ESPECIALLY need people to do social media stuff, write up the event wherever you post, livetweet presentations and displays, take pics, help us make the event come alive for those who can’t get here. And if anyone is able and willing to livestream or Periscope, that is another thing we’d love to do (and get requests for) but which hasn’t happened yet. People who volunteer officially get cool swag, so it’s worth signing up as well as just doing it!

If you ARE a presenter, feel free to recruit one of your friends to videotape you and put it up online, but being sensitive to those in the audience who may be less thrilled about being on camera.

We are really excited about this year’s highlights and keynotes:

Susannah Fox was the health lead at the Pew Internet and American Life Project, and is now Chief Technology Officer of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Whoa. Susannah’s ideas of what qualifies as technology tend toward the broad side. That broad definition makes it easier for her to be absolutely as excited about what makers and real people are doing as much so (if not more) than what professional geeks are doing.

We also have Jose Gomez-Marquez, Director, MIT Little Devices Lab, and Anna Young of Maker Nurse. More information forthcoming about presentations on the patient-led movement to overhaul life with diabetes (a.k.a. the NightScout Project), which you may have noticed under the hashtags #WeAreNotWaiting, #CGMinTheCloud, #DIYPS, #NightScout, #OpenAPS, and probably more.

It promises to be a fantastic event, and we would love your help and participation. If you want to take a look at just how fantastic it was last year, you can do that here.

We #MakeHealth Fest 2014: http://makehealth.us/2014

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On Making Health – Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of June 24, 2014)

White House Tweet on Maker Faire

#MakeHealth, #MakerNurse, #MedLibs, and #NationOfMakers lead off this week’s highlighted hashtags. What they all have in common is connections between maker culture and making health. What is maker culture? Funny you should ask.


White House Maker Faire
The White House had its first ever Maker Faire last week, June 18th. Their hashtag was #NationOfMakers. While the White House didn’t focus solely on health, health was well represented in their audience and presenters.

#NationOfMakers #MakeHealth


We Make Health

University of Michigan is really active in this space, enough so that the topic could be a whole series of posts on its own. Let’s just start with the fact that University of Michigan is sponsoring our own maker festival in August explicitly focused on connecting health, research, clinical care, patients, and maker culture. Our hashtag for this event and going on is #makehealth.


MakerNurse

Work on that event has lead to a lot of questions and thoughts from other medical librarians, which led to a Twitter chat about #makehealth and #NationOfMakers and all that under the hashtag #medlibs and joined by the folks from #MakerNurse!

“What is the Maker Movement, and how does it connect to participatory medicine and personalized healthcare? How is this changing healthcare? How is this changing libraries? How does this connect to the roots of health and healthcare? What are roles for libraries in ‘makering’?”


What will you be making? Help us make health!


First posted at THL Blog: http://thlibrary.wordpress.com/2014/06/23/on-making-health-hashtags-of-the-week-hotw-week-of-june-24-2014/

Ideas for Making Health! [#makehealth]

#NationOfMakers #MakeHealth

Remember I said the idea of the UM We Make Health Fest began with hearing about the White House’s first ever Maker Faire? Well, that is TODAY!!!! The map above shows some of the activity nationwide with people being part of a Nation of Makers. Remember I said, “You have to talk about health. There is SO MUCH going on with bringing the Maker Movement to health!” Then our team went off and brainstormed. Here is a list of the ideas we came up with, almost all of them in the first week of brainstorming.

3D printing
Arduino
Beaglebone
Beekeeping
Biohacking
Biopunk
Coding – PHP
DataViz for PDM
Design Thinking
Big data for relationships?
DIY Apps
DIY Biology
DIY Clinical Trials
DIY Devices
DIY Ergonomics
DIY Genomics
DIY Laboratory
DIY Medicine
DIY Neuroscience
Foraging
Gaming for Health
Hackerspace & Hackathon
Healthy eating: vegan
Home hydroponics
Individualized Medicine
Makerspaces
Microbiome
Mobile Technology
N=1 Studies
Open Source/Open Access
Participatory Medicine
Personal Genomics
Personalized Medicine
Precision Medicine
Quantified Self
Quantified Us
Quantified We
Raspberry Pi
Robotics
Robotics 4 Kids
Self-Hacking
Self-Tracking
Sensors
Solar Cells
Sustainable Design
Sustainable Gardening
Synbio
Wearable Technology

What do you think? Maker Movement + Health might actually be a real thing, eh? As we continue to plan and prepare our event, we’ll be posting more information about the specific ideas that will actually be at our Make Health Fest. Meanwhile, for today, I’m proud to be one of the many makers, from a family of makers, at a University of Makers, in our Nation of Makers.

Health Fair Meet Maker Faire! Part 3: Our Announcement!!

You saw Part One, in which the idea was born, and Part Two, in which the concept was tested and proven. So what actually happened? We’re doing it. We’re really DOING IT! By “it” I mean a health-themed maker faire/fest at the University of Michigan. REALLY!

WHAT:

We Make Health
We Make Health: http://makehealth.us

Emily Puckett Rogers had given us a heads-up about requirements for working with the official Maker Faire folk, which I had not realized was an actual brand name. So we don’t yet know if this is going to be a Mini-Maker Faire or a Maker Fest or what, but it is definitely happening!

Please note that the We Make Health event is a project of Health Design By Us, a participatory behavior change project funded as part of the UM Provost’s Third Century Initiative. It’s a completely awesome and wonderful collaboration, and you’ll be hearing more about it if you read this blog regularly.

WHEN:

Saturday, August 16, 2014

We are still settling on what happens when during the day. We are brainstorming roughly 10am to 6pm, but that may change.

WHERE:

Google Map for Palmer Commons
Palmer Commons: https://www.google.com/maps/place/100+Washtenaw+Ave/@42.2807486,-83.7335814,17z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m2!3m1!1s0x883cae4266554837:0x732dcfa6f8fb7dbe

WHO:

Joyce Lee, Doctor as DesignerPF Anderson, Self Portrait as ShadowMatt Kenyon, Artist

Us! We!

Well, Joyce Lee, Matt Kenyon, and I are taking point on planning the project (with the capable assistance of Emily Hirschfeld). Joyce is from the UM Medical School and Mott Children’s Hospital, Matt is with the School of Art and Design, and I, of course, am part of the University Libraries, Taubman Health Sciences Library. However, we have an email list for folk interested in the event which currently has over 90 people signed up. Many of them have contributed ideas, suggested contacts, volunteered to do booths or presentations, and so forth. We are reaching out to many community maker communities, and have received endorsements from several of them. You’ll hear more about our partners as the event moves closer.

CONTACTS:

1) Sign up at the We Make Health web site to receive information and updates from the Health Design By Us project.

2) If you are part of the University of Michigan, you can sign up through M-Community for the MakeHealthUM email list.

3) If you want to contact the event coordinators, our Make Health Team, you can reach us at: MAKEHEALTH at-sign UMICH dot EDU.

4) Twitter! The event itself is on twitter, as is Health Design By Us.

Make Health: @MakeHealthUM
Health Design By Us: @HealthByUs

If you want to chat with Joyce or me individually, we are also pretty easily reached through Twitter:

Joyce: @joyclee
Patricia: @pfanderson

5) Please feel free to comment on this post! We will have a blog for the actual event, but that’s still being set up. More soon!

WHAT’S NEXT:

What’s coming next is more blogposts and more news! We will highlight some of the technologies and people that will be highlighted at our event, the partners we’re working with, and exciting spinoff projects to help the energy last beyond the actual event. We’ll tell you more about some of the other folk working on health maker events, and other maker communities around the University and the Ann Arbor community.

Health Fair Meet Maker Faire! Part Two

GO-Tech Meeting at Maker Works

In yesterday’s Part One post, I left this with me trying to decide what ideas were most important to show Barbara Stripling. I had drafted a looooong blogpost on April 15th, and showed it to my friend and colleague, Kate Saylor on April 16th. Kate and I were digging around in the post, and the question came up of looking at health maker faires. I didn’t think there had been one. The conversation went something like this.

“Really?”
“Really.”
“Hmmm, that’s odd.”
“Let’s look.”
“Good idea. If anyone can find it, you can.”
“OMG, I can’t find any! Look! There are ones on sustainability, and green living, and one which include health booths, but I can’t find ANY actually themed around health!”
“REALLY?!”
“We have to do this.”
“We TOTALLY have to do this.”
“WOW.” “WOW.

The next person called was Emily Puckett Rogers, another librarian who is one of the leaders behind the Ann Arbor Mini-Maker Faire. She had a LOT of good ideas and information. We brainstormed a while, and then the next step was to start talking with other people to get more ideas. The following day, April 17th, I started a shared spreadsheet in Google Drive for folk to share ideas and collect them in one place. Word spread across campus like wildfire, and many people were making edits. The first week I kept the doc open and just kept watching in astonishment as people across campus kept logging in and out of the file.

April 18th I had a meeting with Joyce Lee about another mutual project. As we walked out of the meeting, I was telling her about this idea. Her reaction was along the lines of, “Isn’t this what we are trying to do? We should do this! We should sponsor this!” And we were off and running.

We started out brainstorming what sort of topics were a good fit for a health maker fair or festival. Oh, there are plenty, and for almost all of them someone would know of a local person doing work with that tech. At this point what I wanted to do was prove the viability of the concept by taking things I’d seen from maker fairs I’d attended and sifting out those with any kind of health relevance. I tried to distill those examples down into a few categories with just a few examples each, but leaving enough conceptual wiggle room to imply some of the other possibilities. The framework I came up with (yes, I know, I’m the acronym queen) is CLASP.

CLASP
* Creativity
* Literacy
* Access
* Sustainability
* Personal Problemsolving

The core ideas contained in CLASP apply to all makerspaces, not just the health aspects. There is also a lot of overlap in the ideas themselves. Typically, each example will include all the concepts. I’m just using this as a tool to help me organize and prioritize the examples I’ve collected.

CREATIVITY

GO-Tech Meeting at Maker WorksAnn Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2013
Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2013 Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2013

One of the things I adore about the Maker Movement is the way people come up with their own solutions to their own problems, as individuals and as a community, through exploration, innovation, experimentation, and creation. Patient communities have been doing the same sort of thing — sharing problems and solutions, brainstorming, turning solutions into marketable products, and more. I’ve been deeply inspired and impressed with the prosthetic solutions coming from 3D printing, from Robohand & Roboleg to the beautiful prosthetic limbs (see the work done by Sophie de Oliveira and Scott Summit).

Closer to home, many people with injuries or conditions that effect mobility find themselves struggling to get in and out of clothes on their own, something that happened to me last year with my shoulder injury. The solutions can be unique to an individual, based on range of motion, grip strength, fine motor control, and other factors. Resources like sewing machines, CAD/CAM tools for modeling, and sergers can be critical to those solutions. Other persons may find healing through something as simple as a beautiful work of art, and the lights and wooden star shown here can be mentally soothing, stimulating, engaging, calming, or a source of meditation and focus. The idea of book binding connects to health, for me, as I encourage patients with a new diagnosis or long-term condition to keep their own notebook about their symptoms, treatments, meetings with providers, questions asked, answers given, etcetera. Being able to customize and personalize your own book makes it more meaningful. I don’t know, maybe this is overkill, or maybe it is the start of a great idea.

LITERACY

Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2013 Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2013 Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2013: Eli Neiberger of AADL Detroit Maker Faire 2013

I’ve never been to a maker faire where I didn’t encounter a librarian. Literacy is a big deal for librarians, and health literacy is a big deal in health care. Your standard health fair is focused around health literacy — communicating the basics around important health topics and common conditions, as well as best practices for prevention. But most of the interaction is one-sided. Health fair attendees pick up fliers and sometimes ask questions, but it isn’t literacy in the way that maker faires handle it. In maker faires, literacy isn’t just “what is it” and “let me tell you what to do.” Literacy becomes “how can I do this myself” and “what skills do I need to take this to the next level” and “what is possible if I [fill in the blank].” Literacy includes playing games to actively engage with a topic as well as building things and identifying what you need to know to achieve your own goals.

In these images, there is a librarian wearing a “Dig into reading” tshirt while she assists at a booth teaching soldering skills; a larger than lifesize version of the Operation board game which can be used to teach hand-eye coordination as well as humorously presented anatomical concepts; another librarian connecting gaming to science and technology fundamentals; and a young scientist showing science products and presenting science literacy concepts. You can’t see it in this picture, but in another image, the same young scientist shows off 3d printed laboratory equipment.

ACCESS

23andMe Celiac Disease Risk Markers
Pebble Pals

In libraries we tend to think of access to information (ie. books and journals) first and foremost. Next we think of access to the buildings, and accessible design. With online information, we think of web accessibility. When we talk about the digital divide we mean access to certain types of technology and networking. With makerspaces we think of access to completely different types of technology. Somewhere along the line we usually mention the skills needed to use these things, but I’m not sure that skills are considered part of the challenge of access. I’m thinking the question of access may be bigger than any of these, and in healthcare, there may be portions of access that are broader and/or narrower than what we usually consider.

The first image above is a snippet from one of my 23andMe health reports. Yeah, the ones that the FDA has told them not to do anymore. Luckily, I got in before that happened. This is just a tiny part of an idea. What’s important isn’t just access to personalized genomics information, or to 23andMe, or even to the health reports. What’s important is a bigger challenge — that the increasing demands on the healthcare system are driving more engagement by and with patients, and there are needs and demands for a very type of information than has usually been made available about health for people who are not medical professionals. There is a need for access to tools and skills that have traditionally fallen outside the purview of the patient.

The second image is of Pebble watches, a wearable technology tool that connects to smart phones and sensors and can be used for games and utility, but also for personal health management. The Maker Movement philosophy has come to healthcare in a HUGE way, and shows no signs of going away. Not only does healthcare need to acknowledge and accept this, but also needs to support, provide access to skills and training, create tools for integrating personal data with electronic health records, and beyond. There are ‘new’ buzzwords giving a glimpse into some of what we could be doing and what might fit into healthcare makerspaces and healthcare maker faires. Here are just a few.

Participatory medicine
individualized medicine
personalized medicine
personal genomics
quantified self
self-trackers
n=1 studies
DIY biology
biohacking
microbiomics
sensors
wearable technology

I don’t know about you, but my brain is going, “Whoa.” How on earth has this not already happened in a HUGE way?

SUSTAINABILITY

Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2013 Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2013: "Be My Sunshine" Heart Box Pic of the day - Vinegars & Pickles Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2013

Hang around with folk in public health for any length of time at all and you start hearing about diet management, outreach, food deserts, community health, environmental health, risk science, and related concepts. An awful lot of what happens in public health is trying to help people and communities develop better ways to create healthy places and lifestyles. This can be growing urban gardens, canning your own produce, putting in solar-powered energy cells, making your own sensors to detect air pollution, and much much more. This is a huge area for connecting what’s happening in maker communities with public health.

PERSONAL PROBLEMSOLVING

Cool Toys Pic of the Day - Maker Movement Meets Healthcare Cool Toys Pic of the Day - Maker Movement Meets Healthcare Detroit Maker Faire 2013 Ann Arbor Mini Maker Faire 2013

We all have problems, we all have challenges in our lives. People with chronic health conditions or caring for someone with a chronic health condition maybe have more, but we can all benefit from skills to help us identify problems, brainstorm possible solutions, and design ways to implement those solutions whether by ourselves or in collaboration with other talented folk. In the Maker Movement, there are a lot of examples of people helping other people to create solutions for both interesting and ordinary problems. Spoons that are easier to grip, glasses that don’t wobble when your hands shake, shoes that sense obstructions you can’t see and warn you, sensors as jewelry or tattoos to monitor your vital signs — these are all examples of creative solutions to personal problems, and there are a LOT more examples out there.

So, are you in? Want to help? When do we start?

Health Fair Meet Maker Faire! Part One

Barbara Stripling for NLW14 on the Declaration for the Right to Libraries

I want a health-themed maker faire. I want it so bad I can TASTE it! And I want it to happen, like, yesterday. Or right now. But let me back up. Here’s what happened. Monday, April 14, 2014, Barbara Stripling came to town to talk about the Declaration for the Right to Libraries. You can read more about her morning talk in the Storify.

To abbreviate DRASTICALLY, the gist of the idea is that libraries overwhelmingly change lives for the better, and that people everywhere have a right to the resources that will support them in taking charge of changing their lives for the better. One of the ways in which libraries have traditionally helped people change their lives for the better is through providing free access to information, education, and entertainment. That’s what Andrew Carnegie was thinking about when he funded the creation of thousands of free public libraries.

October 19, 1903

“Increase our wages,” the workers demanded. “What good is a book to a man who works 12 hours a day, six days a week?” Nasaw says Carnegie thought he knew better and replied to his critics this way: “If I had raised your wages, you would have spent that money by buying a better cut of meat or more drink for your dinner. But what you needed, though you didn’t know it, was my libraries and concert halls. And that’s what I’m giving to you.” How Andrew Carnegie Turned His Fortune Into A Library Legacy http://www.npr.org/2013/08/01/207272849/how-andrew-carnegie-turned-his-fortune-into-a-library-legacy

One of the ways in which libraries have more recently helped people change their lives for the better is through providing free access to the Internet, software, printers, makerspaces, 3d printers, and a wide variety of other tools and resources and skills that empower people to make things to better their lives, and which they could not afford to try if they had to buy the necessary resources out of their own personal budgets. From baking special holiday cakes to commemorate old family traditions with pans from the library to creating a new career and developing new marketable skills, the library can be the place.

“I had these inventions in my head but didn’t know I could make them myself,” Roth explained. So he spent his remaining dollars on a membership and a few introductory courses… Fast forward a few years to spring 2013. Roth is now an entrepreneur with a funded laser company… His dream is to build his own version of TechShop called “the Learning Shelter” that specifically caters to the homeless.” Homeless to hacker: How the Maker Movement changed one man’s life http://venturebeat.com/2013/05/16/homeless-to-hacker-how-the-maker-movement-changed-one-mans-life/

That quote is about Marc Roth, who was homeless when he used his assistance money to purchase a membership to a local makerspace. Perhaps the nicest thing about makerspaces in public libraries is that you don’t need to purchase a membership!

Well, towards the end of Barbara’s talk, seemingly almost as an afterthought, she mentioned that the White House is sponsoring its first Makerfaire! And, naturally, the American Library Association is talking with them about this. Barbara gave warm praise to Kristin Fontichiaro, a University of Michigan faculty member who is working with makerspaces in schools and libraries. And then she said something like, “If any of the rest of you have ideas for innovative work in this space that we should be keeping in mind, please come see me after the talk.”

Well, I wasn’t first in line, but I was most definitely in line. I wanted to ensure that when the Maker Movement / Makerspaces / Maker Faires are discussed, health is not forgotten. Every Maker Faire I’ve attended has had multiple presenters talking about something related to health. I have lots of ideas, and lots of examples. So Barbara then said, “Email me. I’ll try to include this topic in our conversations with the White House. But. Keep it short. Not TOO many examples!” That’s why I started this blogpost. I have literally thousands of links to examples of maker activity connected with health. How to choose just the few most important ones? ARGH!!

Scribbling notes

I scribbled notes and ideas all day, searching related topics and shoving links into a file as fast as I can, when I realized I’ve done it again. I had too much to start with, and now I had even MORE too much! The challenge / opportunity lies in that, when you really look closely at it, EVERY tool, technique, or technology involved in the Maker Movement is or has, can or could, or should be used in healthcare! That’s a LOT of opportunity. And that’s how this grand adventure started.