Author Archives: pfanderson

Keeping Busy, the June Edition

I’ve been a tad overwhelmed for months now — major events, presentations, travel, etc. Lots of stuff to share, but as a quick overview, here are just a few of the Storify collections from recent events I livetweeted or attended or collected online. (I will be doing more blogposts on specific LARGE events for which I did several Storify, like the MLA Annual Meeting, or the Comics & Medicine Conference, or … and then also others from earlier this year). WordPress doesn’t like people to embed Storify links directly into the blogpost, so for each entry, I’ve embedded a tweet that has an embedded link to the Storify. This means, the easiest way to get to the good stuff is to click through.

June 7, 2017

The “Strategies to Empower Women” Symposium aims to close the historic gap that leaves females consistently behind their male counterparts in salaries, grant awards and opportunities for advancement. It was a really powerful event, and I was sad to miss the beginning of it. Making a Storify helped me find and read some of the early comments, even if I didn’t actually get to see the presenters.

“Strategies to Empower Women to Achieve Academic Success”

June 21, 2017

You need to look backwards to look forwards. You need that context of what happened and what worked and what failed to help inspire you to do something truly innovative. I was really delighted to hear Barbara MacAdam describe some of the evolution of library innovation on our campus through the lens of her own personal experiences.

“Barbara MacAdam on Library & Intellectual History at #UofM #UMich200”

June 24, 2017

Great Twitter conversation sponsored by the Journal of the American College of Radiologists on the topic of what is burnout among physicians and other healthcare workers, what does it look like, what do you do?

“Physician Burnout – #JACR June 2017 Chat”

June 26, 2017, AM

The Emergent Research series rarely has presenters from within the library, and rarely presenters who are not actually presenting research or data. In this case, the time slot was used to present really mission critical skills for researchers, faculty, and staff who work with data or concepts that should maybe not be completely public all the time to the whole world. They cast the conceptual net broadly, because, well, frankly speaking, these skills apply to everyone at the University, sooner or later.

“Digital Self-Defense (#MLibRes)”

June 26, 2017, PM

“The Evolving Bargain Between Research Universities and Society”

On D-Day, Exploring the Context of “As We May Think”

As We May Think (Cover)

During National Poetry Month (April), I thought it would be interesting to quote one of the poems published in the same issue of The Atlantic Monthly as the incredible essay, “As We May Think,” by Vannevar Bush.

“As We May Think” was required reading when I was in grad school, and it still it. This is a work that was truly seminal in shaping the origins of the Internet, hypertext, the Web, more. Provocative, inspirational, decades before its time. It’s online, easy to find, and it’s even open and free to the world. When I went looking for poems from the issue, though, that was not easy to find, much less free. I ended up having to request the print copy. Print. Really? You must be kidding me, but no, it’s true. It took me a month to believe I wasn’t going to find it online, and another few weeks for me to place the request for the print and find time to actually look at it.

You know what happens with print? You go looking for one thing, and find something else. You turn a page, and a picture catches your eye. You start to skim one article, but a beautiful word or phrase on the facing page distracts you. Before you know it, you are turning pages whether or not they have anything to do with your original question.

Let me tell you something about the issue of The Atlantic for July 1945. It was published less than a year after D-Day. It was published only a few months after the official end to the war. It was published when people first began to see, to believe, that World War II really was going to end, and stay done. It was the beginning of moving through the shock and trauma of the war, beginning to tell stories that couldn’t be born, that no one wants to remember.

When I first read “As We May Think” it seemed all shiny and glossy, this vision of what might someday become computers, personal assistants, ready flexible access to information. The dream that was so much bigger than people realized at the time, bigger than I realized when I read it in grad school. I had no idea that this was one essay of a larger series that The Atlantic was publishing on science and the war, no real idea of the world in which it was written. Sure, we studied WWII in school, read about the concentration camps, the war bonds, the atom bomb, the refugees, the destruction of historical treasures across Europe, the bombing of London, the evacuations, the debates in America about whether or not to enter the war, the American resistors who joined the war efforts in Europe early and were shunned as unpatriotic for the rest of their lives.

It never really came alive for me, though, in the way that it did when my computers broke this week and I went through the journal issue that contained Vannevar Bush’s essay. Some of what I found there:
– “paper bombs” as tools to influence thought
– Ad: advertisements on new technologies created for the war that had drastic impacts on food and home lives of civilians (from ice cream to oranges to vitamins)
– serious examinations of media reporters, “their reliability, their prejudices, and their mistakes”
– the role of propaganda on both sides of the conflict as obvious and visible even at the time
– first person reports of Buchenwald, shocking ghastly stories neglected from modern reports of the camps
– bitter heart-wrenching poems of soldiers from the fronts
– sweet stories of life back home, still edged with fatigue and loss and an undertone of the global anxieties, and stories of life with what we now call PTSD or depression or anxiety or others
– “Should Jews Return to Germany?”
– Ad: the misunderstood science that led to putting iodine in gasoline
– “Prithee, Little Book, Who Made Thee?”
– Ad: “Coal? Yes, indeed, it’s a big item in the drugstore!”
– Ad: “For the first time in history, a world without poverty and without war is technically possible. Whether we achieve it depends on how well we understand the ‘Economies Of Peace’.”
– book reviews of and advertisements for works by Henry James, Upton Sinclair, Thomas Mann, John Crowe Ransom, W. H. Auden, and other familiar names.

Somehow, “As We May Think” takes on a different flavor in the context of essays, and poems like this snippet from Sasserath, which resonate so very differently now than when they were written, that echo with limits and struggles that repeat now in some places and yet have become fictions in others.

“We who must live on substitutes for life,
The powdered egg, the dehydrated spud, …
Or learn the art of love with plastic limbs …”
“On Anodynes, by Simpson Sasserath, RT2/c

Reading and seeing “As We May Think” in the context of the series of which it was a part, similarly lends a depth that makes it seem even more extraordinary. The series was called, “A Scientist Looks at Tomorrow,” beginning in 1945 ad stretching to at least 1947. It included titles such as these:

– The Social Animal / Caryl P. Haskins
– Stars, Proteins, and Nations / Philippe Le Corbeiller
– A Design for Fighting / Harlow Shapley
– Penicillin, Plasma Fractionation, and the Physician / Dr. John F. Fulton
– A Physicist Returns from the War / I. I. Rabi
– Psychiatry and the Way / Big. Gen. William G. Menninger
– DDT and the Balance of Nature / V. B. Wigglesworth

I’m now curious to find them all, as a fascinating window into what was considered the cutting edge of emerging technologies in the mid-1940s. But the few sentences that resonated with me most closely came from a few months after the Bush essay, towards the end of the year, in an essay called, “The Return to Love,” by Rollo Walter Brown.

We can take our choice. If we do not believe that the awakening, the generosity, the loyalty, the warmth, expressed in love can transform the world into something more livable than what we now have, then we can take the alternative and believe that husbands and wives who cannot endure each other, neighbors who cannot endure each other, races who cannot endure each other, people who scoff at anyone who would make an improvement, can somehow, added together, constitute one world living in amity. We can wait among our raucous hatreds until somebody somewhere decides to enforce his special hatred with some super-super atomic bomb. That is something definite and “realistic.” But might we not have a more interesting world if we tried love?

Accessibility through Social Media for Libraries 101

Just a quick collection of resources I find helpful in using social media to create better and broader access (and accessibility) for library events and more.

ACCESSIBILITY

There are many ways of interpreting the word “access.” The ones I encounter most often are 1) access (as in this thing exists somewhere I can find it or get hands on it, which I think of as ‘discoverability’) and accessibility (as in I can use this, even if I’m a person with a disability, whether my functional difference is visible or invisible).

Golden rules of social media accessibility: http://www.danya.com/files/sma_poster.pdf

Accessibility Hub: Social Media Accessibility – Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube: http://www.queensu.ca/accessibility/how-info/social-media-accessibility

Social Media for People with a Disability: https://mediaaccess.org.au/web/social-media-for-people-with-a-disability

SSB Bart Group: Accessibility in Social Media: http://www.ssbbartgroup.com/blog/accessible-social-media/

ePolicyWorks: 5 Things: https://www.epolicyworks.org/epw/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/ePolicyWorks_SocialMediaAccessibilityTips.pdf

District of Columbia: Office of Disability Rights: Technical Assistance Manual: Section 508: Website and Social Media Accessibility: https://odr.dc.gov/sites/default/files/dc/sites/odr/publication/attachments/Web%20and%20Social%20Media%20AccessibilityTechnical%20Assistance%20Manual.docx

Accessibility U: Accessible Social Media: http://accessibility.umn.edu/tutorials/accessible-social-media

Global Disability Rights Now: Creating Accessible Social Media Campaigns: http://www.globaldisabilityrightsnow.org/sites/default/files/related-files/243/Social%20media%20and%20accessibility.pdf
[comment: I find it super ironic that a site on disability rights is providing accessibility content as a PDF.]

LIBRARY EXAMPLES & ARTICLES

Use of social media by the library, current practices and future opportunities: A white paper from Taylor & Francis: http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/access/white-paper-social-media.pdf

University of Virginia: Library: Legal Information about Media Accessibility: http://www.library.virginia.edu/services/accessibility-services/media-accessibility-resources/legal-information-about-media-accessibility/

Social Media and the Science Library: How It Really Works: http://www.rsc.org/globalassets/14-campaigns/m/lc/lc16026/royal-society-of-chemistry-social-media-ebook.pdf

#FridayReads: Library and campus engagement through social media: https://link.highedweb.org/2017/02/fridayreads-library-and-campus-engagement-through-social-media/

TOOLS

One of the benefits of social media is that it makes content more readily discoverable by a broader audience in time and space. One of the drawbacks is that many social media platforms aren’t easy to use by people with various disabilities. This is just a tiny sampling of some of the information or tools that might help with some parts of that, although not others.

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/
– Facebook Accessibility: https://www.facebook.com/accessibility/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/
– Easy Chirp: http://www.easychirp.com/

Lanyrd: http://lanyrd.com/

Storify: https://storify.com/

SOCIAL MEDIA POLICIES

If you don’t have a social media policy, you will probably live to regret it. Here are some examples.

Why Have a Social Media Policy for Your University Library? http://www.proquest.com/blog/2013/why-have-a-social-media-policy-for-your-university-library.html

Creating a Social Media Policy: What We Did, What We Learned: http://www.infotoday.com/mls/mar13/Breed–Creating-a-Social-Media-Policy.shtml

Example social media policies from libraries

Cleveland Public Library: https://cpl.org/thelibrary/usingthelibrary/policy-on-the-use-of-cpls-social-media-sites/
Monroe County Public Library: https://mcpl.info/geninfo/social-media-policy
Plum Creek Library: http://www.plumcreeklibrary.org/jackson/Docs/social%20media%20policy.pdf
TAZEWELL COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY: https://tcplweb.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2015/03/TCPL-Social-Media-Policy.pdf
Thomas Crane Library: http://thomascranelibrary.org/sites/default/files/Social%20Media%20Policy.pdf
UNC University Library: http://blogs.lib.unc.edu/news/index.php/social-media-policy-for-library-employees/
Washington State University Libraries: http://www.wsulibs.wsu.edu/policies/social-media

GUIDELINES ETC.

Where to start first

Federal Social Media Accessibility Toolkit https://hackpad.com/Federal-Social-Media-Accessibility-Toolkit-xWKKBxzGubh

Federal Social Media Accessibility Toolkit Hackpad: Improving the Accessibility of Social Media for Public Service https://www.digitalgov.gov/resources/federal-social-media-accessibility-toolkit-hackpad/

More resources

Section 508: Create Accessible Video and Social Media https://www.section508.gov/content/build/create-accessible-video-social

Media Access Australia: Social Media for People with a Disability: https://mediaaccess.org.au/web/social-media-for-people-with-a-disability

Improving the Accessibility of Social Media in Government: https://www.digitalgov.gov/resources/improving-the-accessibility-of-social-media-in-government/

Social Media and Accessibility: Resources to Know:
https://www.digitalgov.gov/2015/01/02/social-media-and-accessibility-resources-to-know/

The One-Minute Haggadah and Other Mysteries

Technology is weird, and strange, and it allows us to do things that people would probably not have imagined a few years back. Like this, that just appeared in my Facebook stream — a Rube Goldberg machine to tell the Passover story, which is an essential part of the Jewish Passover seder through the series of prayers known as the Haggadah.

Or this, DIY Haggadah generator, an online interactive tool to help you create and share your very own custom haggadah.

DIY Haggadah Tool - Haggadot
https://www.haggadot.com/

People have done some really interesting and creative things with making their own Haggadahs. I’d like to share some of them with you, but first a bit of context. While I am not Jewish, I have sometimes had the privilege of being invited to the Passover seder celebration, which is beautiful and meaningful. I confess to being surprised by some of the range of Haggadah I’ve stumbled across, and the fluidity with which some have taken the story and personalized it in ways that range from profound to hysterically funny. I suspect some of these examples are probably not actually something a Rabbi would approve, but I’m pretty solidly a Gentile, so I will leave that to the experts. For this list, I just collected a few examples showing some of the creative and diverse ways in which people have explored this beautiful tradition in ways that may or may not make it more timely or relevant in their own context. For myself, I’m inspired by the creativity of how people are telling the essence of the same story in so many very different ways. Some of these links simply to point to a discussion about an example, while others provide the full text. I will note these latter in italics.

Absolut Haggadah

Adam and Steve Haggadah (LGBT themed)

The Baseball Haggadah [Book]

The #BlackLivesMatter Haggadah

Bruce Springsteen’s rock’n’roll Passover Haggadah

Bubie’s Haggadah (for children)

Different from all other nights: A Queer Passover Haggadah, from the NYU Bronfman Center

Dr. Suess-style Haggadah [sic]

The Freedom Seder T(inspired by Martin Luther King)

Exodus: Movement of Jah People (includes parody tunes such as “Take me out to the Seder” sung to the tune of “Take me out to the ballgame”)

Freedom Seder for the Earth (Haggadah for the Earth, PDF)

Haggadah for the Liberated Lamb (vegetarian)

Hamilton Haggadah (about, download, audio)

The Harry Potter (unofficial) Hogwarts Haggadah [Book] (about 1, about 2)

Immigrant Roots, Immigrant Rights; Labor Seder (about the Labor seder)

JQ International GLBT Haggadah

The Kahoot Seder (done with interactive classroom clicker technology)

Ma Nishtana: A GAY, LESBIAN, BISEXUAL, TRANSGENDER, QUESTIONING, ALLY HAGGADAH

The Medium is the Matzo (urban themed)

Monty Python Haggaddah

The Neverending Haggadah (a crowdsourced haggadah collection)

Peace is Sexy Haggadah

Poet’s Haggadah [book] (about)

Pride Freedom Seder Haggadah (LGBT-themed)

Refugee Stories (HIAS Haggadah Supplement, PDF)

So Called Seder: A Hip Hop Haggadah [CD]

The Stonewall Seder (LGBT-themed)

The Two-Minute Haggadah: A Passover service for the impatient.

Velveteen Rabbi’s Haggadah for Pesach with a cover and slideshow version (an open source haggadah by a poet, also a woman rabbi)

Worthy is JAH Lamb, a Rastafari Passover Haggadah (pdf)

Zombie Haggadah [Book] (about)

Your Opinion Matters

Legendary Phoenix: Your Opinion

I find myself disturbed by today’s TeeFury special, by Legendary Phoenix. The image shows Rick, a stereotypical scientist in a white lab coat with messy hair, a unibrow, eyes ripe with ennui, bags under his eyes, a pointy nose, and a glum descending (and condescending) mouth. The scientist is saying (in a word bubble), “I’m sorry, but your opinion means very little to me.”

TeeFury: Legendary Phoenix: Your Opinion

I expect some science geeks to jump up and down with glee and say, “You see? It’s not about OPINIONS! Ha! Gotcha!” However, one of the greatest challenges in science communication and science literacy is this perception that scientists are unpleasant, self-centered, passionless, people unwilling to listen or hold a civil conversation within the public sphere. “Your opinion means very little to me” could be “because I really prefer evidence over opinion” or it could be “because I’m socially inept and don’t care what people think” or it could be “because I bloody well don’t think you have anything to offer, and so I’m not listening” Or all of the above (and more).

And however you read it, these imply scientists have nothing to learn from experience, no compassion, no courtesy, no duty to educate or inform or improve science literacy among the broader populace, no understanding of intellectual sharing or community building, etcetera. Of course, real life is actually the opposite, on all counts, but this is the common perception.

This common perception has resulted in dangerous and ill informed policy decisions, reduced funding for research, strategically ill-applied research funding, poor translation of science findings into practice, and ultimately, unnecessary deaths and misery among those (all of us) who would benefit from the implementation of scientific discoveries.

“Scientific literacy is an urgent and important issue. Why should we care? The answer is simple: Our way of life and our survival are at stake.” – G. Wayne Clough, Secretary Smithsonian Institution

Your opinion matters

What I want to say is, “Your opinion matters. It matters because I care about how you got to your opinion, and I can learn from that. It matters because you might have information or resources or data that informs that opinion which aren’t available to me. It matters because I might have information or resources or data that aren’t available to you, and which might help both of us. It matters because if we put together what you have and what I have and more, we might get a picture of the problem or solution that are closer to what we really need. It matters because what how you feel about your opinion and how I feel about my opinion give an emotional context that is important in telling stories and shaping policy. It matters because IT MATTERS. So, tell me what your opinion is, share your sources and stories, listen to mine, and let’s learn together.”

I’m not buying the t-shirt. Or maybe I should, so that I can have this conversation over and over again.

Visual Abstracts — Thoughts from a Medical Librarian

Visual Abstracts (Screenshot)

You might be interested in this initiative arising out of surgery, and primarily developed by Andrew M. Ibrahim MD, MSc of the University of Michigan. Dr. Ibrahim is a Clinical Lecturer in Surgery here and a Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar at the Institute for Healthcare Policy & Innovation. His idea of a visual abstract is kind of a blend of visual literacies, infographics, posters, and science abstracts.

In surgery, this is being adopted as a new strategy for creating journal article abstracts. It is being mentioned by the Annals of Surgery, Cochrane Collaboration, Journal of the American College of Surgeons (JACS), and the World Journal of Surgery, among others.

It lends itself to plain language explanations of concepts, clarity for funding agencies and policy makers, and as a tool for public outreach and education. The visual abstract may be more accessible to folk with cognitive or learning disabilities, while being less accessible to those with visual disabilities. There are powerful benefits, especially in this era of publicly contested science findings, as well as some significant drawbacks if we were to depend on the visual abstract to replace written abstracts. Another challenge is that it isn’t actually searchable in databases, and the issue of how to include and discover visual abstracts in MEDLINE remains to be addressed by the National Library of Medicine. Personally, I’m not sure that it replaces the full functionality of the traditional abstract, but rather supplements it, which I suspect is the intent. Offering both strongly empowers science communicators and educators, especially if the images are licensed to promote use and dissemination. It would be ideal if the standard of practice for visual abstracts would be to make them Creative Commons licensed.

Medical librarians must be aware of this, and should develop the competencies and skills necessary to make them so that they can help support their institutions as well as creating these for their own articles and research. One of the most common questions about this is how to locate or create icons to use. Just a few quick suggestions. If you have a significant budget, hire a graphic designer. If you have a smaller budget, consider licensing icons from the Noun Project. If you have more time than money, consider using Open Clip Art, where the images are free, but it may take more digging or editing for images you can use.

Cool Toys Pic of the day - Noun Project

So, how do you make these? Dr. Ibrahim has examples, videos, and guidelines available at his site.

Here is the direct link to the primer, including guidelines and best practices for the creation of visual abstracts, but I have not been able to get the direct link to work consistently.

https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5854aaa044024321a353bb0d/t/58b8f5b437c5816223531822/1488516555585/VisualAbstract_Primerv2.pdf

Increasing numbers of journals are requesting visual abstracts as part of article submissions or are creating them as part of promotional content for highlighted articles. You can find many examples on the website, and more in the Twitter stream for the hashtag #VisualAbstract. Here are some examples from the past couple weeks.

Have You Seen … What NIH is doing with their videocasts?

EDITORIAL ASIDE:
Yes, I’ve been away for a long time. I have so much to share, and so many lovely blogposts and concepts parked in “draft” mode. It’s been a rough few years culminating in a really rough year. More on that later. For now, I want to dip my toes back in with something short and easy that I can do quickly.


If I had infinite time, or several dozen of me connected to a shared massive brain, one of the things I’d like to do is lurk in various lecture series and soak up all kind of cutting edge info, philosophies, science, research discoveries, and so forth. Recently, I’ve been closely tracking the NIH Videocasts. So much wonderful information being presented, and lucky for us, most of it ends up on Youtube as NIHVcast!

Here are a few highlights from the Youtube channel, mostly from the NIH Director’s Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series and the Demystifying Medicine series, but with a few also from the Translational Research in Clinical Oncology (TRACO) program.

NIHVCAST HIGHLIGHTS

Demystifying Medicine 2017: Mitochondria, Aging, and Chronic Disease

Germs, genes, and host defense

TRACO 2016: Precision Medicine and Nanotechnology

Ancient DNA and the new science of the human past

Democratizing discovery science with n=Me

Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee – July 2016

Decoding the human genome: getting to 20/20

MicroRNAs and their regulatory effects

The epigenetic clock, biological age, and chronic diseases

Genome regulation by long noncoding RNAs

Demystifying Medicine 2016: How Long Can and Should We Live & What Centenarians Teach Us about Aging

Bacteria as master regulators and aphrodisiacs

Demystifying Medicine 2016: Robotic Planetary Exploration and Thoughts about Human Spaceflight

Age, genes, sex, and smell: predicting Parkinson disease

Demystifying Medicine 2016: Cholesterol: Too Much and Too Little Are Bad for Your Health

Biomedical research: increasing value, reducing waste

Demystifying Medicine 2016: Trauma in the Modern Age: Injury and Stem Cells

On My Own: An Afternoon with Diane Rehm

Demystifying Medicine 2016: Multiple Sclerosis: Mechanisms and Imaging the Process

Innate molecules in the inflammation and cancer

Using human stem cells to understand and treat diabetes

Adventures in brain plasticity: from memory palaces to soulcycle