Lives Change! — Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of April 14, 2014)

Hatcher Graduate Library

Libraries change lives. As medical librarians this concept is at the heart and soul of our daily lives. What we do either directly informs the patient or the care provider, and can change both individual lives as well as the standard of care across institutions and nations. We all have stories of this happening. Sometimes it is that the information actually changed the progression of a disease or healing from an injury, while sometimes it is simply the caring and sense of someone listening who cares and understands.

This year, for National Library Week (which, by the way, starts today), the theme is LIVES CHANGE! Barbara Stripling, the President of the American Library Association, has proposed the Declaration for the Right to Libraries. Getting people to sign the Declaration is only part of it. Another part of it is getting people to stop and think and talk about how libraries have changed their lives.

Was it the librarian who made a safe place for you when you were a child in an unhappy home?

Was it the librarian who got you permission to access secured information for a school project that ended up becoming your career?

Was it the librarian who quietly found just the right book to help you deal with something that was troubling you?

Was it the librarian who dug deep and found some less common treatment ideas when everything else had failed?

Was it the librarian who kept your health challenges private, but gave you a person to talk with when there seemed to be no one?

Was it the librarian who listened to every idea you had for your thesis, and then turned up surprising tidbits you didn’t know you wanted?

Was it the librarian who helped you find and connect with a person to prototype your invention to make a new career for yourself?

Was it the librarian who found the answer to that one question that your next big project hung on, making it possible to complete the planning on time and under budget?

The hashtags for the week are associated with this meme – Lives Change, and National Library Week. Now, go sign the Declaration, and then tell your librarian you did, and why.

“Lives Change” / “Libraries Change Lives” #LivesChange

National Library Week 2014 #NLW14


First posted at THL Blog: http://thlibrary.wordpress.com/2014/04/14/lives-change-hashtags-of-the-week-hotw-week-of-april-14-2014/

Preparedness — Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of April 7, 2014)

SL - Wolverine: UMMS Elective, Play2Train

It seems like now every week has so many incredible conversations going on that it is hard to choose a topic for these weekly posts. This week I was saved by the synchronicity of two separate tags with similar themes. The annual Preparedness Summit conference was going on (#PS14), and then the weekly medical librarians chat (#medlibs) also focused on disaster preparedness. So, there you go, that’s today’s topic!

The Preparedness Summit focused on the profession, trends, new research, etc. The medical librarians chat, to my surprise, focused less on libraries and more on practical personal sharing of what’s most important to remember for personal safety in various types of disaster scenarios. Both were useful and information. Here are highlights from both hashtags. There are even overlapping tweets, with both hashtags!


First posted at THL Blog: http://thlibrary.wordpress.com/2014/04/07/preparedness-hashtags-of-the-week-hotw-week-of-april-7-2014/

Beyond “Light it Up Blue” — Maybe “Light it up Gold”!

UN: World Autism Awareness Day

Today is World Autism Awareness Day, a permanent observance created by the United Nations. Monday, Anna Schnitzer and I attended a presentation on campus by Elizabeth J. “Ibby” Grace on the rhetoric of autism activism. You can find notes, pictures, and livetweets from the event in this Storify.

Autistic Activism in an Age of the Blues: https://storify.com/pfanderson/autistic-activism-in-an-age-of-the-blues/

In the event, part of what we learned was that the Light It Up Blue campaign for autism awareness, which presents itself upon first glance as if they are representing the UN in this, is actually a corporate project sponsored by the controversial organization Autism Speaks.

Autism Speaks: Light It Up Blue

Autism Speaks does fund a great deal of interesting research, so I’m not going to touch on why they are considered so controversial (at least not in this post!). It was interesting to learn more from Ibby Grace about other ways to celebrate World Autism Awareness Day and support autism acceptance and the ASD community. Here are some she mentioned. Tone it Down Taupe seemed to be her favorite, but since we are UM, I figured if we aren’t going blue, maybe gold is another good choice! There are also a few others that appeared while I was searching.

WAAD: Tone it down taupe

Tone It Down Taupe (for Autism Acceptance): http://toneitdowntaupe.tumblr.com/
TIDT on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Tone-it-Down-Taupe/446945788708219

WAAD: Light it up Gold

Light it up Gold (from AU for Autistic Union): https://www.facebook.com/groups/Goldforautism/

WAAD: Light it up Red

Light It Up Red: http://autismthroughoureyes.org/LightItUpRed/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/664431953623778/

There are so MANY images of the ribbon with the puzzle or the rainbow puzzle ribbon, that I can’t possibly point to them all. Here is one from Wikipedia.

Autism Awareness Ribbon

Meanwhile, Ibby Grace had a great point about diversity and acceptance in considering the question of autism awareness and acceptance.

Rainbows!!


First posted at THL Blog: http://wp.me/p1v84h-1US

April Fools Alphabet

SLBPE: Exhibits & Posters: Educational Innovations - More Alphabets

Start typing in a Chrome search bar and it starts to fill in URLs it thinks you might want, usually based on where you’ve been recently. So, here is an “Alphabet” of where I’ve been recently! Looks like most of what I do is work. Such a surprise, eh?

A is for Amazon
B is for Books
C is for CORE-Ed
D is for Doodle
E is for ETechLib (Duh!)
F is for Facebook
G is for Guides
H is for Healthfinder
I is for Images
J is for Jamendo
K is for Keep Calm
L is for Library
M is for Mirlyn
N is for News
O is for Open Badges
P is for Pubmed
Q is for “Questions to ask before surgery
R is for Rosefirerising
S is for Slideshare
T is for Twitter
U is for UMich
V is for Venngage
W is for Wunderground
X is for XKCD
Y is for Youtube
Z is for ZDnet

Reverse Innovation — Hashtags of the Week (HOTW): (Week of March 31, 2014)

Ethnic Box

Reverse innovation is a concept I’ve been tracking closely recently, and which is critical in global health. The idea, in health anyway, is that we have as much to learn from developing nations as they have to learn from us. I heard a story of a visiting faculty member here from Ghana who saved a baby’s life because he knew how to manually reposition babies in the womb during delivery when there isn’t enough time to get the machines that are sometimes used here for the same purpose. That’s just one small, local example. Last week’s Twitter chat on reverse innovation brought up several others. You can find the complete chat and cited articles in this Storify:

Do low-income countries hold the key to health innovation?: https://storify.com/pfanderson/do-low-income-countries-hold-the-key-to-health-inn

Here are a few selected tweets from the chat.


First posted at THL Blog: http://wp.me/p1v84h-1UN

On My Radar: “Reverse Innovation”

Ethnic Box

“Reverse Innovation” is a concept that came across my horizon a few months ago, and for which I immediately went into high alert. This is important. I want to push today’s Twitter chat on this topic, so I’m going to keep this post very short, and hope to come back to this more soon.

Briefly, then. What first brought this to my attention was a blogpost at Biomed Central which was closely followed by an article in Smart Planet.

Reverse Innovation in Global Health Systems: Building the Global Knowledge Pool http://blogs.biomedcentral.com/bmcblog/2013/04/12/reverse-innovation-in-global-health-systems-building-the-global-knowledge-pool/

Dehydration cure from developing countries comes to U.S. hospitals http://www.smartplanet.com/blog/bulletin/dehydration-cure-from-developing-countries-comes-to-us-hospitals/27991

The basic idea of “reverse innovation” is this, as expressed through my ill-informed novice point of view. The past century or two have largely seen scitech and research and cultural innovation flow from the first world countries to the third world countries. This has resulted in unrealistic expectations and unsustainable processes which are making life harder for all of us, everywhere across the planet. In the interests of increased sustainability and the desire to create innovation that will integrate more efficiently with the broader systems of the planet, the idea is that problem-solving partnerships between first world and third world researchers can result in innovations that are both effective and sustainable, with the innovations flowing from the third world countries to the first world, thus reversing what has been the recent pattern.

You can discover more information about reverse innovation through these resources.

JOURNAL:
Globalization and health: http://www.globalizationandhealth.com/

KEY ARTICLE:
Developed-developing country partnerships: Benefits to developed countries? http://www.globalizationandhealth.com/content/8/1/17

SOUNDBITE:

“Developing countries can generate effective solutions for today’s global health challenges.”

SPECIAL ISSUE / ARTICLE COLLECTION:
Reverse innovation in global health systems: learning from low-income countries http://www.globalizationandhealth.com/series/reverse_innovations

HASHTAGS:
– Primary
#revsinv
#reverseinnovation
– Other
#revinno
#revinnov
#innoverse

Every Day In Many Ways: Solving “Wicked Problems” at the University of Michigan

Horizon Report 2014 Trends & Challenges
Horizon Report 2014: http://www.nmc.org/publications/2014-horizon-report-higher-ed

The past couple months, the Cool Toys Conversations group has been discussing the Horizon Report, as we do every year. This year we decided the collection of technologies was perhaps not as interesting as the trends and challenges they identified (screenshot above).

Yesterday, over the lunch hour, the group became particularly interested in the wicked problem of “Keeping Education Relevant.” There was a lot of good conversation, and I unfortunately did not take notes, so I am going to trust my memory (HAH!). The gist of it was encapsulated in a couple points. David Crandall pointed out that there is a strong relationship between the so-called solvable challenges and the so-called wicked (or unsolvable) challenges, with the hint that perhaps solving the solvable challenges might actually take us a long way towards solving the unsolvable challenges. (Yes, it’s ok to giggle – that’s a lot of the same word.)

Next was the observation that “Keeping Education Relevant” is distinct from keeping learning relevant, since learning is ALWAYS relevant. So the question is less about how to keep learning relevant, but more about how to position the kind of education that happens in higher education as an active participant in the broad open amorphous space that is comprised of all those glorious online and offline social learning spaces that people love so much.

Last but not least was the interjection that, Hello! Maybe it isn’t so unsolvable after all, since so many folk here are already doing such exciting things to position us, as academics, in ways to show relevance to the public and to engage with the public. Actually, I suspect that all major universities are engaged in similar kinds of activities, and working hard to make clear the ways in which academia is not only relevant, but makes possible research and learning opportunities that benefit the broader communities and which would not be possible or practical in other types of spaces and structures.

Here are just a very FEW examples of activities around campus that are, frankly, not atypical and which illustrate ways in which we are making academia relevant here, every day, as a routine part of business.

UMSI MAKERFEST

#UMSIMakerfest !!! | #UMSIMakerfest !!!
#UMSIMakerfest !!! | #UMSIMakerfest !!!

Today, the School of Information had a Makerfest in the Union. As you can see from the poster, they had a lot of cool stuff going on, from Google Glass and Rasperry Pi to video games and cookies. Among their partners for this event were multiple community makerspaces, both the campus and local public library, individuals with special talents or resources, and of course, campus groups. Was the audience just college students? No way! Students were there, but also parents and kids, teachers, staff, community, and I don’t know who else.

#UMSIMakerfest: https://www.flickr.com/photos/rosefirerising/sets/72157642967068393

TEDXUOFM

DSC_0149 | IMG_6735
3O5A9174_Kimwall | TEDxUofM
IMG_5416 | eak.FEA.TEDxUofM.4-8-11.044.

A couple weeks ago (less, actually), the campus had our TEDx event (TEDxUofM). TEDx events are gatherings of fascinating people sharing innovative and creative ideas. They are spinoffs from the large TED organization where TED stands for Technology Entertainment and Design. My brain keeps trying to change the “E” to “Education”, since that’s what my brain associates with the TED videos, but when you think about it, “Education” and “Entertainment” are pretty closely related in many important ways.

With our local TEDxUofM event, it ALWAYS is highlighting topics that connect academia and the real world, projects that make a difference in the lives of real people, stories that touch hearts and lives. It doesn’t accomplish this by just making a forum for faculty to preach to the choir, but by giving prominence to projects by students and alumni as well, and by getting faculty to talk about their passions beyond their official job duties. In this sense it is like most other TED and TEDx events. Here, of course, the event connects the campus and the town and community. There isn’t just one TEDx event locally, but several — TEDxDetroit, TEDxUofM, TEDxEMU, TEDxSkylineHS, TEDxArb, TEDxYouth@AnnArbor, TEDxUMDearborn, and probably more I haven’t covered/discovered. TEDx events are partnerships with the community, ways to bring information out of ivory towers and into public spaces. They engage, emote, intrigue, and inspire. They foster awareness, and through awareness future collaborations.

RISK BITES

In Andrew Maynard’s recent presentation, “Should Academics Get Down and Dirty with Youtube?,” he illustrated the power of Youtube to reach the public, to educate, to inform, and to potentially inform policy and decisionmakers. This insight of his was reinforced by President Obama’s recruitment of video bloggers (vloggers) with strong reach among the youth audience in order to disseminate critical information about the Obamacare registration deadlines.

Andrew highlighted a number of influential vloggers who present content on science and research, but who are not themselves from academia, then asking what is it that they are doing that we are not? Why is it that the general public obviously have a passion for information about science, but find science information more persuasive when presented by someone who is not a scientist? What are we not doing that we should be or could be doing? These questions are what inspired him to create the Risk Bites series of science videos, in which he endeavors to position academic and heavily evidence-based science information in a public space in a way that will hopefully reach those who need the information. Here is the most recent video from that series as an example.


What’s the difference between hazard and risk? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_GwVTdsnN1E

ROAD SCHOLARS

Goodwill-Industries | Chateau-Chantal
Cascade-Engineering | Discussion-with-legislators

The University of Michigan Road Scholars program has been going on for DECADES. The idea was, yet again, how to make academia relevant to the communities in which we find ourselves. More than that, it was how to create bridges, connections, and partnerships between the University and the people of our state. In the Road Scholars program, faculty travel the state on a kind of pilgrimage to various communities around Michigan, developing a genuine and personal connection to the people and places, learning about the initiatives and work that is done around the state, and fostering opportunities for outreach, partnerships, mutual regard and learning.

GHANA EMERGENCY MEDICINE COLLABORATIVE
D80_35
Ghana-Michigan Conference Nov 2009 023 | Ghana-Michigan Conference Nov 2009 024
D80_30

The Ghana Emergency Medicine Collaborative is another project that has been going on for a while. These images are from an early event in 2009 which laid some of the groundwork for this collaboration between the University and medical programs in Ghana. The collaboration involves individuals from both schools going to the other country to learn more about needs, resources, and opportunities. This innovative partnership drove much of the initial development of the University’s creation of open education resources, and has proven to have a large and lasting impact far beyond the original scope of the project.

CLOSING THOUGHTS

Are you here at the University of Michigan? Are you interested in a campus-wide conversation about barriers to innovation in education and what we are already doing to solve these problems? Do you know of some amazing work people are doing to help keep us relevant? Please add your thoughts in the comments.